My Fair Godmother

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0802797806
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Overall rating 
 
3.8
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3.5  (2)
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Cute fractured fairytale story
Overall rating 
 
3.0
Plot 
 
3.0
Characters 
 
3.0
Writing Style 
 
3.0
I love a good fairytale retelling. While My Fair Godmother wasn’t the best I’ve read in the genre, it was cute enough. The author, Janette Rallison, did a nice enough job bringing a few new elements to some classic fairy tales.

The story starts off in modern day Virginia with the sisters Jane and Savannah and their shared loved interest Hunter. I thought the story was going to stay in the modern setting, but that was quickly corrected. The Fair Godmother (“Chrissy”) seemed to muck things up when she kept sending Savannah into various fairy tales set in medieval times. You see, Chrissy isn’t very good at her job. She didn’t pay much attention in fairy godmother school so her grades barely scraped by. She spends more time playing around with her friends and shopping than she does listening to her charges. You can imagine how that could cause some problems in the magic department.

The characters were so-so in My Fair Godmother. Jane and Hunter didn’t offer much to the plot other than the initial conflict. The majority of the story focused on Savannah and Tristan. Savannah was being pulled through various fairy tales because she wanted a “prince” to take her to prom. While that was going on, Chrissy was scoping out Tristan. Somehow along the way she thought it would be best if Tristan became an actual prince, and so he was sucked into the Middle Ages. I will say that when Savannah decided to go help rescue him, that made the story more interesting. There were plenty of action points and hidden twists to keep things lively while the characters were in the Middle Ages.

The intermittent “memos” from what I think was the Fairy Council was a bit confusing at first. I see their purpose, but it was a bit annoying. There were too many points of view telling the same story. It was Savannah’s story, but the letters offered insight from at least three other characters. For younger readers, that might be a little confusing to follow.
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A Delicious Treat!
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
I like teen romance, in small doses. The smarter those romances are, the more likely I am to pick up the author’s next book. If you throw fantasy into the mix, well, that’s like stirring peanut butter cups into a gooey dish of caramel chocolate ice-cream. My Fair Godmother by Janette Rallison is a funny teen fantasy romance with morals to boot. What a delicious treat!

The basic premise of My Fair Godmother is nothing new: Girl is dumped by Boy; Girl feels rejected; Girl chases new Boy. Even if Girl is dumped by Boy because Boy started dating Girl’s sister, it’s an old story. I didn’t even particularly care for the handling of the sister’s betrayal: Jane meets Hunter; He finds her sister Savannah prettier and doesn’t know that Jane exists; Jane overhauls her image and now of course Hunter notices her. At this point, I almost shut the book. Hollywood movies would have teenage girls believe that if only the homely girl would remove her glasses, every guy would swoon. Was Rallison going to fall into that superficial trap? Rallison even tosses out this observation: “Adults are always telling teenagers that it’s what’s on the inside that matters. It’s always painful to find out that adults have lied to you.” If the prologue hadn’t been written by a hip and young fairy godmother in training, who apparently is terrible at her craft, Rallison might have lost me as a reader. Even when Jane turns into a jerk and so the story instead becomes all about how Savannah needs a new boyfriend, I kept reading. Once I got past this bumpy start, Rallison won me over as a fan.

See, my above criticism aside, Rallison is one smart author. Through the guise of the three wishes that Savannah is granted by her godmother, Rallison imparts blunt truths about love. The rules of the wishes are they must pertain directly to Savannah and must be tangible. In other words, Savannah can’t wish to be lucky, popular, or even happy. Therein, lies the conundrum. Savannah’s first thought is to ask for Hunter fall back in love with her, but she is smart enough to know that winning Hunter back only with magic won’t make her truly happy. What Savannah really wants is for someone to love her whole package—even if that means a boy accepting that sometimes Savannah will be late, disorganized, or lazy. How does Savannah put that into a wish? She tries, but as is so often the case with wishes, they do not go according to plan. She wishes for her life to be like a fairy tale with a handsome prince waiting for her at the ball and that “everything will work out happily ever after”. The next moment she finds herself in a cold, dark room, and learns that she is Cinderella. Complete with a cruel step family. And back in medieval times where indoor plumbing doesn’t yet exist, nor does soap. There’s more. Savannah has to do chores. Oh, and her so-called Prince Charming is a tyrant who hangs people who rebel against poverty. When her godmother responds to Savannah’s distress calls, Savannah receives a full dose of life’s lessons. Savanna didn’t want to work like Cinderella for eight months? Well, how else could a prince rescue her from a dreary life? Savannah didn’t want a cruel tyrant? Well, the reality is that Savannah fell for Hunter solely based on looks. Then why did she prioritize good looks and say nothing about personality? As for happiness, that is entirely up to Savannah. Rallison never holds back any punches with her morals, but she also wraps them up so creatively in the disastrous outcomes of Savannah’s wishes that the lessons feel like logical outcomes in a riveting story.

Of course, it also helps that Rallison’s laces her love story with humor and fantasy. Some of the humor lies in Savannah’s attitude. When talking about Tristan (you had to know there would be a second boy), she says he would’ve been completely overlooked in high school if not for his athleticism “that he may have acquired by running away from bullies”. Some of the humor lies in the scrapes that Savannah finds herself in. Before her fair godmother shows up, Savannah heads to a swim party with her best friend. Still reeling from the throws of rejection, Savannah wears a bikini to remind guys of her existence. As she saunters up to the diving board, Savannah realizes too late there might have been an advantage to wearing a full-piece suit. Primarily, it wouldn’t fall off her body when she hits the water. In a less talented author’s hands, this humorous scene could’ve flopped. Rallison instead makes this a riot, by having Savannah unable to see without her contacts, then having the life guard ordering her to clear the dive area, and finally having Tristan calling out within the hearing of everyone in the pool: “She’ll just be a second. Her bikini top came off!”

As for the fantasy, you already know there’s a godmother. There’s also a leprechaun, a wizard and an apprentice with potions and poisons to sell, a Cyclops that Tristan needs to fight, and a mysterious black knight. Some of these magical creatures are nothing like the ones you might know from fairy tales. Case in point, Savannah’s godmother Chrissy is a teenage girl decked out in a tank top, miniskirt, knee-high boots, and sunglasses. Oh, and did I mention that her hair is cotton candy pink and matches not only her purse but her nails? Also, Chrissy cares more about malls than magic, which is why she so easily botches her spells and takes what seems like forever to respond to Savannah’s distress calls. Others creatures such as the leprechaun resemble the traditional depiction and thus it shouldn’t surprise you to learn that the leprechaun in this book cares desperately for his gold. For the most part, Rallison stays faithful to the original fairy tales into which she dumps Savannah. Even when she departs from them for literary purposes, they never left me with the bad taste some other fractured tales have. For this feat, I also commend her!

I love fantasy, in big doses. Whether it comes in the form of humor, romance, or another genre, I’m going to try it. Yet while my love of fantasy might mean I’ll pick it off the shelves more often, an author still needs to be smart for me to seek out more of their books. Janette Rallison is, in so many ways. She might even be my new author find.
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An awesome re-telling of some Fairy Tales
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Lizzy

If you are a fan
of disjointed fairy tales, or like a little bit of historical
adventure, I would suggest picking up a copy of My Fair Godmother. At
the start of the book, the superficial "airhead" Savannah seems to have
the perfect life. She has a good-looking boyfriend, Hunter, and doesn't
really seem to be bothered with anything other than shopping and prom.
Her older sister, Jane, is completely different from Savannah. Jane
concentrates on her schoolwork rather than her appearance, and had been
crushing on Hunter even before he started dating Savannah. Refusing to
give up, Jane undergoes a total makeover,
and
in the process she gets Hunter. That's breaking the most cardinal rule
of sisterhood...never steal your sister's boyfriend. It's an unwritten
rule. Luckily, Savannah has a fair(y) godmother to help save the day.

Or not. Savannah's fairy godmother,
Chrysanthemum
Everstar, isn't what one might imagine. She's just like Savannah,
shallow and immature. Her wishes go haywire, and she doesn't really
seem to care whether Savannah gets her prince charming or not. For her
first two wishes Savannah is sent back in time, once as Cinderella, and
once as Snow White. Rallison doesn't Disney-ify these princesses, they
lived in the middle ages, and it was miserable. Plus, the princes don't
seem very prince-like, they're rather rude and egotistical.

For
her third wish, Savannah inadvertently sends a classmate back in time,
and she has to go back to help him become a prince, otherwise they'll
both be stuck there forever. While there they encounter a dragon, a
cyclops, and a dark knight who is more than he seems.

I really
enjoyed this book, it had all the elements I look for in good YA
fiction. There was a little bit of romance, some fantasy, and it was
funny.
It also made me appreciate shampoo, and being able to bathe on a regular basis. In
other words, I didn't want to set it down. While this was Rallison's
first fantasy novel, I hope to read more like this from her.


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Lessons Learned
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Brittany Leigh

I have an 8 year old niece. I also have a list of books that I set aside just for her to read when she gets older, maybe around the age of 13. These books teach you a lesson. Lessons that all young girls should learn before they start middle or high school.

My Fair Godmother by Jannett Rallison is on that list.

I read this book 3 weeks ago and re-read twice since. It starts out with a young girl, Savannah, who get dumped by her boyfriend so he could date her older sister. Savannah was the girl who didn't like school and used her looks to get the grades she got. Her older sister, on the other hand, was smart and pretty, but not the prettiest girl in school like her younger sister.

Rallison takes Savannah and the readers through 3 different fairy tales and when she's done, you'll never think of Snow White the  same again. And Prince Charming in Cinderella? Well, he isn't as charming as we thought.

At the end of the book, both Savannah and the readers learn a good lesson on not using your looks to get you through life. Be smart. Don't take things for granted. And, do not what-so-ever, be vague when you make wishes to a Fairy Godmother in training.

The lesson is for young girls and older teen girls. It

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Fairy Tale redux
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Julie H

This is a great fairy-tale retelling, a mixture of Cinderella and Snow White. When high schooler Savannah's older sister Jane has a makeover and catches the eye of Savannah's senior boyfriend Hunter, the sibling wars begin. Enter Chrystanthemum Everstar, a fairy godmother who has a lot to prove after exiting her early training as only "fair". Chrissy appears to Savannah, finally convinces her she really has three wishes and proceeds to mangle them by not really listening to her. All Savannah really wants is a prince to take her to Prom. First, our fair godmother sends Savannah back to the Middle Ages, as the real, lives in rags, there's a pot of porridge over the fire for days because there is no refrigeration, Cinderella. Repeated calls to Chrissy by Savannah finally are heeded, but then she misinterprets yet again and Savannah is back in the Middle Ages as Snow White. Lucky for her, the dwarves just think she's insane and head off to tell the prince about her affliction. Once she's home again, Savannah discovers news of a missing classmate, Tristan. Turns out Chrissy has been at work again, and sent him to the Middle Ages on a quest, never to return unless he becomes the prince Savannah needs. Savannah finds a loophole in her fairy contract and Chrissy must send her back to help oversee Tristan's development.
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godmother galores
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by stephanie

Two words: Utterly hilarious.

I loved My Fair Godmother. It's funny, entertaining, witty and, did I mention, hilarious?? I think I loved everything about this novel - the plot, the characters and the writing style.

The plot was adorable. Just the idea of being sent back in time as different princesses for different fairy tales for two wishes is just plain original and extremely entertaining. Imagine all the mistakes and errors that occur along the way. It definitely made me curious and I'm so glad that I picked this book up!

And the characters? Totally funny. I admire Savannah's response to everything - it's SO FUNNY. I feel as if I keep repeating the word but it's so true especially for this novel. At every chapter, there's always something that happens that makes me crack up to no end.

And the godmother? Ahahahaha, I love her style and though her attitude needs some improvement, it just adds to the hilarity of the novel. I loved how Janette have a Godmother school and how the fairies are just "fair" if they're not that good. It's like this whole another level of imagination, right?

I also loved how the fairy tales all happened in the Middle Ages. If it was me, I probably wouldn't be able to know what time period the tales were in but I guess the Middle Ages makes sense.

Overall, My Fair Godmother was amazing and I really want to read her other book now.
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Fun and romantic modern fairytale!
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Chantele


Savannah Delano is pretty, popular, and has a gorgeous boyfriend at
her side. Everything seems to be going her way, until her boyfriend
falls for her older sister Jane and dumps her. Everything comes
crashing down on Savannah, and she can't understand why she can't find
a decent guy anywhere. She just wants a prince who will live happily
ever after with her.
Enter her "fair" godmother Chrissie. A gum
chewing, high heels wearing, shopoholic, who grants her three wishes.
Although, to Savannah's dismay, her wishes get blown way out of
proportion. Soon after a few words leave Savannah's mouth, she finds
herself transported back to the middle ages, working under a wicked
stepmother as Cinderella. Soon after being Snow White, and living with
7 grumpy dwarfs who think she is stupid, she finds out Chrissy sent a
guy from her high school, Tristan, to the middle ages to become a
prince, worthy enough to take her to the prom. Savannah finds herself
trying to rescue Tristan in a crazy adventure, complete with an ogre, a
fire breathing dragon, and the mysterious, black knight.
I
absolutely loved this book. Savannah's thoughts are hilarious! She is
such a funny, likeable character. I loved Tristan as well. If you like
fairy tales, this book will not disappoint. I have loved all of Janette
Rallison's books so far, and hope she will continue writing such fun
stories. A great, clean read, with a little romance thrown in of
course! Hopefully we will see some more of Chrissy in the future!

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