Confessions of a High School Disaster

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Confessions of a High School Disaster
Author(s)
Publisher
Age Range
12+
Release Date
March 07, 2017
ISBN
978-1481488754
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In the tradition of Bridget Jones’s Diary, a lovably flawed high school student chronicles her life as she navigates the highs and lows of family, friendship, school, and love in a diary that sparkles with humor and warmth. I’m Chloe Snow, and my life is kiiiiind of a disaster. 1. I’m a kissing virgin (so so so embarrassing). 2. My best friend, Hannah, is driving me insane. 3. I think I’m in love with Mac Brody, senior football star, whose girlfriend is so beautiful she doesn’t even need eyeliner. 4. My dad won’t stop asking me if I’m okay. 5. Oh, and my mom moved to Mexico to work on her novel. But it’s fine—she’ll be back soon. She said so. Mom says the only thing sadder than remembering is forgetting, so I’m going to write down everything that happens to me in this diary. That way, even when I’m ninety, I’ll remember how awkward and horrible and exciting it is to be in high school.

Editor reviews

2 reviews
Great Look Inside a Teenagers Life
Overall rating
 
3.7
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
3.0
Writing Style
 
4.0
Confessions of a High School Disaster is the first installment of the Chloe Snow series. I read the second installment first and enjoyed it so much that I decided to go back and read ‘Confessions of a High School Disaster’.
In this book Chloe is just about to start high school. Her immaturity definitely shows through in this book. This makes sense as she is just at the beginning of both high school and her parents divorce. The combination of these two things definitely would push Chloe to concentrate on more important things than basic teenage stuff ( i.e. being a kissing virgin).
I think divorce is an important topic for YA to tackle as its something many teens must work through and I think COAHSD did it well. One of the most eye-opening aspects for me was Chloe was how her opinion of her mother’s actions changed throughout the story. In the beginning Chloe made excuses for her mother’s actions. Later on she realized that her father is the one who stayed and her mother was the irresponsible one. I also really enjoyed Chloe’s relationship with her dog. I love YA stories that include pets. I also loved that this relationship helped Chloe work through her parents divorce and her mothers abandonment.
While I didn’t enjoy this installment as much as the first one, I am glad I read it as it fills in the blanks for me. I plan on reading the rest of the series and am excited to see what happens in Chloe’s junior year.
Good Points
Realist teenage problems. Quick read.
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Interesting and Relevant, Yet Somewhat Too Mature
(Updated: April 14, 2017)
Overall rating
 
4.0
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
3.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
'Confessions of a High School Disaster: Chloe Snow's Diary' by Emma Chastain had its moments. Main character Chloe is starting her freshman year of high school and is determined to make a splash. Even before she sets foot in school on the first day, she meets incoming senior Mac Brody, with whom she falls head over heels into a crush. It doesn't seem to matter to her that he's dating the most beautiful senior girl. Chloe seems to think she has a shot, and Mac doesn't deter her from believing this, as he makes more-than-friendly remarks to her whenever he sees her.

Despite Chloe seemingly having a good start to freshman year with the above facts, she isn't having the easiest time with her home life. Her mom has basically abandoned her and her father, moving to Mexico to work on her novel. She says she'll come home, and stops back in town once in a while, but she keeps Chloe's delusions of her return to normalcy and suburbia up by never telling her that she truly doesn't have plans to come back, at least not in the same family-friendly capacity as before. Chloe often takes this out on her father, figuring that he is the reason behind it all. Her meanness toward him and rejection of all things "right" and "proper" by going against the grain much like her mother does, make her sometimes seem the naive, misunderstood girl, and other times the girl who gets what is clearly coming to her.

Many of the details of Chloe's exploits in the story seemed too old for her. This isn't to say that freshman girls who are fourteen and fifteen years old don't have issues relating to sex, alcohol, and seniors who want to make their lives miserable, but she seemed very caught up in issues that seemed far too old for her since she started out the story not seeming nearly as mature as the progression of her storyline. Even her best friend, who was a devout church-goer and seemed to not like Chloe's chosen path for freshman year, found herself getting mixed up in issues that seemed older than the way her character was written. Maybe some of this was meant to showcase Chloe's clear naivete to all of the senior exploits that she found herself dealing with, but it sometimes seemed too much for her young age.

All in all, Chastain has written a story that is interesting and relevant in this day and age. However, avid readers of young adult novels may find themselves thinking that the plot could have been made much more realistic based on Chloe's age. Or, they may consider the idea that if Chloe's past had been explored more, including who she was and how she acted in middle school, her issues may not have seemed so out of the ordinary for her.
Good Points
Chastain has written a story that is interesting and relevant in this day and age.
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