Labyrinth Lost (Brooklyn Brujas #1)

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4.3
 
4.0 (3)
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Labyrinth Lost (Brooklyn Brujas #1)
Age Range
12+
Release Date
September 06, 2016
ISBN
9781492620945
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Nothing says Happy Birthday like summoning the spirits of your dead relatives. I fall to my knees. Shattered glass, melted candles and the outline of scorched feathers are all that surround me. Every single person who was in my house – my entire family — is gone. Alex is a bruja, the most powerful witch in a generation…and she hates magic. At her Deathday celebration, Alex performs a spell to rid herself of her power. But it backfires. Her whole family vanishes into thin air, leaving her alone with Nova, a brujo boy she can’t trust. A boy whose intentions are as dark as the strange markings on his skin. The only way to get her family back is to travel with Nova to Los Lagos, a land in-between, as dark as Limbo and as strange as Wonderland… Beautiful Creatures meets Daughter of Smoke and Bone with an infusion of Latin American tradition in this highly original fantasy adventure.

Editor reviews

1 reviews

A Story as Tenacious as Its Protagonist
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
In Labyrinth Lost, Zoraida Cordova introduces a Brooklyn full of magic and mayhem, and a family of brujas that will charm and delight readers. Alejandra "Alex" Mortiz hates her magic, and her upcoming Deathday celebrations only add to the anxiety. I loved Alex's voice--it was engaging and witty, and so very smart. She's a girl who's figuring out who she wants to be, and who she wants by her side while she grows up.

Following Alex, we land in Los Lagos in search of her family, and Cordova's worldbuilding comes into full force here. Latin American magic flows through each new part of Los Lagos, the Deos (gods), and Alex's own encantrix powers. Cordova keeps the plot moving beautifully through Alex's wry, determined commentary. The conflict itself feels organic, mirroring Alex's inner confusion and fears, and giving her a chance to decide what kind of bruja she wants to be. Nova, the mysterious brujo guiding Alex, might be the weakest part of the story, though you do get the sense that Cordova might have more in store for him.

Labyrinth Lost is a journey worth taking, a story built by love and history and heritage in all the best ways. Zoraida Cordova has written a book much needed for Latinx and non-Latinx readers alike, and which will fuel imaginations for years to come.
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User reviews

3 reviews

Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0  (3)
Characters 
 
4.0  (3)
Writing Style 
 
4.0  (3)
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great book!
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
"Labyrinth Lost" is an incredible fantasy adventure. Alejandra (Alex) is an encantrix, a bruja of all trades, but she insists on denying her magic, trying to suppress it. One day, it escapes from her anyway, and her family plan her deathday celebration- the coming of age for a bruja where they begin in their training. Just before the ceremony, she plans a spell to get rid of her powers for good- with the unwilling aid from a hot brujo boy named Nova. The spell backfires and her family is taken into Los Lagos. Alex immediately goes after them with the (paid) help from Nova.

What follows is a Wizard of Oz type quest through Los Lagos and a number of obstacles which Alex must face to get to and free her family. A fascinating set of characters has been created, and I don't want to give it away, but it's an incredible world! It combines mythologies into an all new creation. It's fascinating and amazing. There are some scary parts- it's a riveting adventure! The book is fast paced.

Alex learns about herself and comes into her own with each step along the journey. Her personal growth during the book is quite large. Overall, I really loved the unique story and cast of characters! Beautifully done.

Please note that I received this book from the publisher through netgalley in exchange for my honest review.
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So good!
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
First of all, look at the cover! I love it, it's gorgeous! It would be difficult to pass by a book with cover like that. And I always have been fascinated with myths of underworld or world in between, like Greek myth of Hades and the Underworld. Labyrinth Lost is a similar story with Spanish/Latin American origins and Dia de los Muertos inspiration. I don't know much about Day of the Dead myths and traditions and for me Labyrinth Lost was a good way to dip my toes in.

The author created interesting fantasy world steeped in Latin folklore and legends, the world of brujas and brujos, magic and cantos. I also liked her strong and complex characters, Alejandra, her sisters and Rishi; Nova with his secrets and his tortured past. I really enjoyed Labyrinth Lost and the fact that it is very different from any other YA fantasy book out there.
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Good Start, Bad Finish
(Updated: September 11, 2016)
Overall rating 
 
2.7
Plot 
 
2.0
Characters 
 
3.0
Writing Style 
 
3.0
“I wonder what it’s like in other households during breakfast. Do their condiment shelves share space with jars of consecrated cemetery dirt and blue chicken feet? Do their mothers pray to ancient gods before they leave for work every morning? Do they keep the index finger bones of their ancestors in red velvet pouches to ward off thieves?”

Premise : Alejandra is a Latin-American witch, also known as a bruja; but she hates and fears her powers. When she determines to reject her powers and heritage, her attempt backfires in a big way, and she must journey to the underworld, Los Lagos, to redeem herself.

YA FANTASY 2.5/5 STARS.

What I Liked : (1) Labyrinth Lost begins well, setting the scene in a house full of Brooklyn “brujas,” with creepy descriptions of what it means to be a Latin-American witch. The unique, Latin-flavored details are the main reason I wanted to read Labyrinth Lost in the first place. (2) Zoraida Cordova’s lyrical, original prose covers more than just the Latin-American world of the brujas: it also portrays Alex’s personal life, before the plot starts rolling. Alex struggles with a realistically painful and frightening magical “coming of age,” but she also enjoys a fun relationship with her siblings—equal parts love and snark. When they joke about reincarnation:

“What did I do in my last life to deserve you two?” “You were a pirate queen who stole a treasure from Cortes and then ended up deserting your crew to man-hungry sharks.”

So despite a few clunky plot points, early on, and the brat of a narrator (Alex is overly aggressive with everyone except Rishi, her bisexual love interest, with whom she softens almost to the point of sentimental silliness), I flew through the first half and noted, with rising hope, the unique descriptions of the secondary world that Alex enters through a portal.

“It startles me when I look at both ends of the horizon. The moon and the sun are out at the same time. On one end, the sun is a white circle hidden behind the overcast sky. On the other side of the horizon is a sideways, slender crescent moon, the points facing up. Something swells inside of me, a faded memory of bedtime stories about them reaching across the sky to join together—La Mama and El Papa.”

Disappointments : (1) Around the 50% mark, it became clear that Rishi was only included in this story for her sexual orientation; she has no plot purpose. Not only does Rishi have no meaningful character arc, I can’t think of one thing she does to influence the plot. Ultimately, many readers looking for a good LGBT fantasy were disappointed (if Goodreads is any indication).

(2) Although the book’s Latin-American pantheon is full of uniquely named gods and goddesses, the deities end up blending together without much distinction or mythology. None is particularly fleshed out. Occasionally, a character shares a great story about one of the gods, but only very occasionally.

(3) Alex and Rishi are irritatingly ambivalent about Los Lagos and its gods. Rishi, in particular, acts like they’re traveling through Candyland, not Hell. She’s constantly like, “OH SHINY THINGS EVERYWHERE LET ME TOUCH THEM!” And Alex and Nova are like “STOP TOUCHING THAT YOU DARLING STUPID MAGPIE!” Literally, Alex constantly calls Rishi names such like “my little magpie.” It makes the book feel more MG than YA. Behavior like this also deescalated the tension, for me, because if they’re not wary, why should I be?

Nova is the only character with any sense or passion about his religion. Here he defends his belief to the teen girls:

“Nova sounds frustrated as he says, ‘I can’t explain belief. I just have it. I know the power in me comes from somewhere. I know that the magic in my veins is real. No, I can’t tell you that if I speak to the Deos, they answer back with words, but there are other ways. When was the last time Zeus came down from Olympus and hung out just to prove his existence?”

(4) The magic system has similar problems to the pantheon. While it is beautifully developed in language and atmosphere, it’s totally underdeveloped as a tool. Alex draws on physical energy to use her magic and no one ever defines her magical boundaries. So basically...Alex can do anything; that knowledge sucks the tension from the action sequences and the climax.

Overall : Labyrinth Lost is unique among YA Fantasy, although its worldbuilding won’t satisfy longtime readers of Fantasy. It sidesteps some of its own questions (such as, “If at least some of the Latin religious myths are true, what about Rishi’s Guyanese religion?”); the tension is destroyed by a cardboard villain and unlimited deus ex machina magic; and the contrived bisexual relationship seems to have been included only as a selling point.

Still, the merits of the book stand. The unique Latin-American feel of this novel earns it 1.5 stars. I also generally liked the sentence-level craft of the book, which earns it a half star. And the twist at the 80ish% mark gives it another half star.

If the premise gives you a burning desire to read the book, as it did me, you may find something to like, here.

My thanks to Zoraida Cordova, Sourcebooks Fire and Netgalley for my review copy of Labyrinth Lost.
Good Points
The beginning details, imagery and characterization grabbed me immediately.
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