Written in the Stars

 
4.2 (2)
 
4.0 (1)
2258 0
Written in the Stars
Author(s)
Age Range
12+
Release Date
February 24, 2015
ISBN
9780399171703
Buy This Book
      
This heart-wrenching novel explores what it is like to be thrust into an unwanted marriage. Has Naila’s fate been written in the stars? Or can she still make her own destiny? Naila’s conservative immigrant parents have always said the same thing: She may choose what to study, how to wear her hair, and what to be when she grows up—but they will choose her husband. Following their cultural tradition, they will plan an arranged marriage for her. And until then, dating—even friendship with a boy—is forbidden. When Naila breaks their rule by falling in love with Saif, her parents are livid. Convinced she has forgotten who she truly is, they travel to Pakistan to visit relatives and explore their roots. But Naila’s vacation turns into a nightmare when she learns that plans have changed—her parents have found her a husband and they want her to marry him, now! Despite her greatest efforts, Naila is aghast to find herself cut off from everything and everyone she once knew. Her only hope of escape is Saif . . . if he can find her before it’s too late.

Editor reviews

2 reviews

Arranged marriages still happen
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Naila knows that her parents won't be happy with her if they find out she's dating Saif. Not only has his sister brought disgrace to his Pakistani family, but Naila's traditional parents have forbidden her to date because they intend to arrange her marriage. She's counting down the days until she can go to college and live her own life, but makes the mistake of going to Prom with Saif. Her parents find out, and before she can blink, they are all visiting family in Pakistan. She enjoys it at first, especially getting to know her cousin Selma, but things soon take an ugly turn, and Naila realizes that her parents have not only arranged a marriage for her but set a date. She tries to escape, but they have taken her documentation, and bring her back after her one attempt. Even though Amin is a good guy, being forced into a marriage she doesn't want makes Naila understandably angry, but given her circumstances, there are few ways out. Can her cousin and Saif helf her escape?
Good Points
Rich with cultural details, and brilliantly straddling the expectations of both US and Pakistani cultures, Written in the Stars offers a gripping portrayal of a girl who wants to make her parents happy, but realizes that this will not be possible, given their cultural differences. While Naila's parents, as well as her in-laws, are unwavering in their beliefs, we see Naila wondering what the best options are when her circumstances become dire. Is the best course of action to give up? Can she learn to be happy in a situation she can't control? Amin is also sympathetic as the husband who has great hopes that Naila will love him, but who eventually realizes that his family lied to him. However, he remains invested in the traditional culture not necessarily because he believes in it, but because he has seen few other otpions.

This is a slow paced novel, mirroring Naila's isolation and waiting. We see few glimpses of the world outside of the homes, because Naila is not afforded them, although the descriptions of the life inside the homes, from the food to the clothing to the awkward teas with prospective bridegrooms, are vibrant and detailed. The few moments when she does make attempts to flee punctuate the novel brilliantly, and make her continued captivity all the more poignant. The afterword assures us that she eventually is able to better her situation, and the notes from the author help to understand why she has written such a polemic against arranged marriages, even though she herself is in a happy one.

While readers who want happier stories about arranged marriages might prefer the ambiguity of Kavita Daswani's Lovetorn, Written in the Stars will appeal to those who like their romances with a side of problems. There are some details of Naila's married life that are disturbing, but they are described in such a way that a reader without prior knowledge will not grasp the full impact of what is occurring, so this would be appropriate for 6th graders and older.
Report this review Comments (0) | Was this review helpful to you? 0 0
An Eye-Opening Read
(Updated: April 09, 2015)
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
3.0
"Life is full of sadness. It's part of being a woman. Our lives are lived for the sake of others. Our happiness is never factored in."

I'm not sure what I expected from Written in the Stars, but it definitely wasn't what I received. Naila's story of a forced, arranged marriage both shocked and horrified me to the point where I had to put the book down several times. It reminds me of how I felt while reading Little Peach, except I knew going into that one was going to be hard. I didn't expect the same level of anger and heartbreak as Naila's situation went from not-so-great to down right horrifying.

Naila is hiding a secret from her parents: She's in love with a boy named Saif and if her parents were to find out, they'd be furious. The choosing of her husband is left to up to them, with no input from her. As a result, This may see like too much involvement for some, but for Naila culture, it's a deep level of trust and love for her parents that motivates her to accept this... kinda. The problem is that since she has found someone who she's fallen in love with, she no longer wants that for herself. But the worst does happen, and Naila suddenly finds herself whisked off to Pakistan, far away from the boy she loves and a life she wants.

Written in the Stars really opened my eyes to the issue of forced marriages and arranged marriages. Before reading this novel, I personally couldn't understand why someone would be okay with any form of an arranged marriage, but Naila's story has really shown me that a forced marriage is NOT the same thing as an arranged marriage. I really loved Saeed's guest post at YA Highway, where she goes into detail about the different forms of arranged marriages and I encourage you to check it out and learn new things! Naila is coerced, drugged and imprisoned during her "courting process." She doesn't want the life that her parents are choosing for her and tries desperately to escape. This, obviously, is completely wrong and a form of abuse.

There was a part of me that understood her parents' concern for Naila. I too grew up in a very religious household where I wasn't allowed to go to school events and parties or out with friends. Thankfully, I was given a lot more freedom and my parents became more understanding while I was in high school. So I understood why her parents were strict: they viewed it as a way of protection for their daughter. Unfortunately, they completely crossed the line and abused the trust Naila had in them by forcing her into a marriage she didn't want. They are a perfect example of having honorable intentions, but horrible, horrible actions through unreasonable justification. They fully believed that what they were doing was for the good of Naila and they viewed her relationship with Saif as a threat to her future. It also seemed like they were angry that Naila took away their "right" to choose her mate. There were just so many complex parts to their relationship.

What I really enjoyed was the writing style. It's very simple in nature, which originally concerned me. But I grew to appreciate it more as the story went along because it allowed for Naila's vulnerability to truly shine through. There weren't any fancy prose or deeply metaphorical phrases to distract the reader from what was actually happening. Naila's circumstance was enough to completely captivate me from beginning to end.

I also appreciated Saeed's Author's Note at the end that mentions forced marriages can happen in any culture, country or religion and is condemned by all. This was such an important distinction because there are some cultures and religions that get a lot of flack about arranged marriages in general. I love how she makes the reader aware that an arranged marriage is a loving arrangement between all parties and that no one should be forced to do anything they don't want. This is also why I think it was smart that Saeed left out mentions of any of the characters' religious beliefs. I know this may be a fear of some readers, but it was very tastefully done and Naila's religion is not blamed for what happened to her. The only blame placed is on the people that did this to her.

To conclude, I'm so happy I read Written in the Stars because it's helped me understand so much more about arranged marriages and forced marriages. It's books like this that make me incredibly grateful for the We Need Diverse Books campaign to help put more books like this on the market. I'm really excited for what Saeed writes about next.
Report this review Comments (0) | Was this review helpful to you? 0 0

User reviews

1 reviews

Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0  (1)
Characters 
 
5.0  (1)
Writing Style 
 
3.0  (1)
Already have an account? or Create an account
Gut-wrenching
(Updated: April 16, 2015)
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
3.0
Naila’s immigrant parents are very conservative but they allow her to wear her hair as she wants, study what she wants, have the career she wants, but all with the understanding that they will choose her husband. It’s their cultural belief that they arrange marriage for her and until then, dating is forbidden. Naila, though, can’t help but fall for Saif. When her parents find out, they’re furious and plan a trip to Pakistan to teach their children their roots. Naila thought it was a vacation to see the family she’s never met, but she soon discovers the truth. Her parents have found her a husband and plan for her to marry quickly. Naila’s only hope to escape is Saif but can he find her before it’s too late?

At just over 300 pages, this book ended up being a quick read but one that stood out. I thought the author did a great job showing the culture, the differences between an arranged marriage versus a forced marriage, why someone would accept an arranged marriage, and having villains in the story without vilifying an entire culture.

Naila, my heart broke for her many times. She was a great example of how a character can be so powerless yet remain strong. She fought every step of the way, she refused to just give in to something she never wanted. Even when her life was miserable, she still showed care and concern for others.

Most of the focus of the book was on Naila but her whole family was heavily involved in the plot. When Naila, her parents, and her brother first arrived in Pakistan and so many family members were there, always around, catching up, the huge family aspect was so familiar. The dynamic of the family was really interesting to see. Who people deferred to, who obviously didn’t agree with decisions made but kept quiet, what each person’s place in the family was. Saif, Naila’s boyfriend from home, played a huge role even though he barely appeared in the book. He was Naila’s hope and that hope helped her fight.

The book was very fast-paced. It seemed like only a few pages had been read and they were in Pakistan, then a few more and Naila was discovering the truth, then a few more and it was over. It flew by. Even with the fast pace, it didn’t take away from the horrors Naila experienced. It was hard to read, gut-wrenching, and it did a great job of being unforgettable.
Report this review Comments (0) | Was this review helpful to you? 0 0
Powered by JReviews

FEATURED GIVEAWAYS

Latest Book Listings Added

Instant Karma
 
3.7
 
0.0 (0)
In New York Times bestselling author Marissa Meyer's young adult...
Put Yourself in My Shoes
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
When Cricket goes for a walk, he finds Ladybug searching...
Selma
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
Selma is asked: What is happiness? ...
Benjamin's Blue Feet
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
A young bird with a flair for discovery and invention...
Pocket Piggies: I Love You!
 
4.5
 
0.0 (0)
What’s the best thing in the world? I...
Everything Under the Sun
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Sun’s Reach is in dire peril. The last...
Lizzy Albright and the Attic Window
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Lizzy Albright, a red-headed, freckle-faced girl from Overland Park, Kansas,...
Send Me Their Souls (Bring Me Their Hearts, #3)
 
4.3
 
0.0 (0)
There are worse things than death. ...
The Walrus and the Caribou
 
4.5
 
0.0 (0)
When the earth was new, words had the power to...
The Elephant's Umbrella
 
3.5
 
0.0 (0)
Elephant is always ready and willing to share her prized...
Calvin Gets the Last Word
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
The dictionary as narrator? YES! ...
Goblin King (Permafrost, #2)
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
In Kara Barbieri's Goblin King, the stunning sequel in the...

Latest Member Reviews

The Train Your Brain Mind Exercise: 156 Puzzles for a Superior Mind
 
3.0
"The book sets expectations a bit high by touting the claim of unique puzzles for all skill levels, with a..."
Goodbye: A Story of Suicide
 
3.0
"A (quasi-creative?) non-fiction graphic novel, aimed at a Middle Grade or lower YA audience. It addresses the topic of bullying..."
1789: Twelve Authors Explore a Year of Rebellion, Revolution, & Change
 
4.0
"What worked: Fascination collection of essays that show the impact of the year 1789 in the world.In this anthology, twelve..."
Strong Voices: Fifteen American Speeches Worth Knowing
 
4.0
"A compilation of excerpts from fifteen noteworthy speeches, selected from across American history. The chosen pieces represent great variety,..."
Wild Girl: How to Have Incredible Outdoor Adventures
 
4.5
"WILD GIRL: HOW TO HAVE INCREDIBLE OUTDOOR ADVENTURES is written by Helen Skelton, a veteran wild girl herself. In this..."
Sabina: In the Eye of the Storm
 
5.0
"'Sabina: In the Eye of the Storm' by Bella Kuligowska Zucker is an incredibly moving tale of the author's search..."
Beauty Mark: A Verse Novel of Marilyn Monroe
 
5.0
"What worked: Haunting, tragic tale of the life of Marilyn Monroe, told in verse which gives a powerful punch to..."
Hope in the Mail: Reflections on Writing and Life
 
5.0
"HOPE IN THE MAIL is an autobiographical account of the author’s life as it relates to her writing. Wendelin Van..."
Super Sons: The PolarShield Project
 
3.0
"An alternate reality take on the Super Sons series, featuring the middle-school aged offspring of Batman and Superman. When "climate..."
You Too?: 25 Voices Share Their #MeToo Stories
 
4.0
"What worked: Great compilation of personal essays inspired by the #YouToo movement. Each of the authors included in this anthology..."
This Is 18
 
5.0
"This is a fascinating view into what it's like to be a 18 year old girl throughout the world shown..."
They Called Us Enemy
 
4.0
"This graphic novel is an early life personal account of a major historical event (the internment of Japanese Americans durring..."