To Kill a Mockingbird

 
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4.6 (49)
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Age Range
12+
ISBN
0060194995
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49 reviews

 
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Overall rating 
 
4.6
Plot 
 
4.3  (49)
Characters 
 
4.8  (6)
Writing Style 
 
4.8  (6)
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The best book I ever read!
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
at first i was like,"well,here we go this is going to be a long book.' But was i wrong! i love this book! Ms.Lee really took you into Maycomb County in 1930s Alabama and into Scout Finch's life. I couldnt put the book down. i loved this book and hope you do to!
Good Points
The plot,characters,and the writing was the best! I love this book!
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Classic.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
I read this in my junior year of high school, and I still love it. It is something that you never forget.
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A great book for sure
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
I love this book
Good Points
This book is awesome I have not read this great of a book since 9th grade.I need to get this book and also reread this great classic of a book.
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Moving story
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
I read this book a few years ago, but I loved it. I need to read it again. It's beautifully written with a powerful message and some of the most likable characters in fiction.
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A Favorite Classic
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
This tense, atmospheric gem of a story takes place in a southern setting that is so real I feel like I could walk out my front door and see Boo Radley hiding behind his curtains in the house on my corner. I love the sense of adventure, honor, and family love that permeates this story. The deeper issues of prejudice and true justice are always worth looking at, and seeing them through the eyes of a child makes it that much more poignant. A wonderful book that everyone should read.
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To Kill a Mockingbird: Book Review
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Overall, this a splendid book and I very much enjoyed every bit.
Good Points
To Kill a Mockingbird Review:

Where I live now is nothing like the sleepy, steaming town of Macomb, Alabama. Although, the author sure Harper Lee made me think I was really living there. In the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, stories are told in the view of an 8-year-old girl named Scout Finch. Scout's Father, Atticus, is an admired lawyer that helps out a black man, trying to win his case in court. This black man, named Tom Robinson, is accused of a terrible crime.

The reason I really liked this book was mainly because of Atticus. His wisdom stuck in my brain and life lessons were thrown at me. Atticus always seemed to have the perfect advice for either of his children, Jem and Scout, and even me! He seems so brave to be able to stand up for a black man in front of a town that despises people like Tom. He seemed to not care about what the world thought of him, which is something that's hard to do.

Mystery and adventure swirls into the story when the mention of Boo Radley comes alive. He is the Finches neighbor, but he never leaves the house. Apparently, only a few, lucky people have seen him step outside into the sunlight. Scout, Jem, and their new friend Dill act out skits of what they think Boo is like. The suspense you get from the tricks they play just make you want to read faster.

While the kids fun and games are at hand, Atticus is busy with the trial. I think as the story goes on, you get the vibe that Scout wrote these stories to show what a good, loyal man and father Atticus was. You can tell that he tried to do the right thing for everyone, and for not just himself. He kept his skills and talents to himself until they were needed. For example, when he shoot the rabid dog coming down the street in one shot without his glasses.

If you were to look deeper into the story, and find the heart of it, you'd find the theme. It's not just about living through tough conditions. It's about living in a world of intolerance towards other races. The townsfolk in the story are scared of other people's differences, and treat them like they don't belong. This could happen anywhere in the world that we live in today, making To Kill a Mockingbird even more realistic.

Throughout the court Tom's court trial, Atticus questions with caution. Some of the things that he asks seem to have no meaning, but in the end you'll discover why Atticus asked them in the first place. In the end, Atticus made it quite clear that Tom is innocent. He explains that black men and women are human just like us, and should be treated no different. But, I think everyone new that Tom was going to be convicted one way or another just because of the color of his skin.

The man who accused Tom, Bob Ewell, was enraged at Atticus for standing up for a black man and proving him wrong. He begins to show hatred towards the Finch family by spitting in Atticus's face. Of course, Atticus didn't do anything violent. He just walked away out of the kindness and patience in his heart. Now, Atticus's kids are in in danger of Bob. To find out what will happen to the kids, Boo Radley, and Bob Ewell, you'll have to read the book!
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To Kill A Mockingbird Review
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Alice - A.S.B.A.

General Overview: This book took me
a week to read. A week. Books hardly ever take me that long to finish.
I did, however, very much enjoy it.

Characters:

Although I enjoyed Scout's narrative, I thought she seemed too mature
and insightful for her age -- she's supposed to be eight, yet she
sounds like she's at least sixteen. I did think that she was extremely
perceptive and wise, and I really enjoyed that for a change, instead of
girls who are somewhat ditzy and clueless. It was also interesting to
read from the POV of such a young character, at an age where not much
of the world is yet seen or understood. My favorite character by far,
however, was Atticus. I loved his shrewdness and his intelligence, and
I liked how he was so very capable of standing up for himself and for
his family. He seemed, to me, to have the personality and mannerisms
that most men should aspire to also possess.

Plot: Okay, this book is a classic,
and I can understand why. The book addresses serious issues such as
racial discrimination, though also moral values such as family and
trust. Though this book has its light moments, it is, for the most
part, a somber book, and I don't think it is to be taken lightly. Half
of this book revolves around introducing the children, Jem and Scout,
and their obsession with a reclusive man named Boo Radley. The second
is about a case their father, a lawyer, has taken on about a man named
Tom Robinson. The majority of this book is not centered around Tom
Robinson's case -- it's centered around how the children grow and how
they act, and their family and the environment they grew up in.

Writing:
It might be a little hard to understand, as are all classics. But once
you do, you jump right in. Lee's writing is absorbing and clear, and I
very much enjoyed her style of writing.

Overall: 4 out of 5 stars
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Standing up for Truth
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Flash


The book, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is both a delightful and suspense-filled piece of literature. Set in the rural city of Maycomb County during the middle of the Twentieth Century, the story consists of both adventure and thrill. Told through the eyes of Scout Finch, a young girl growing up at the time the story takes place, also the main character, this story has equally classical and real-to-life qualities. Atticus Finch, Scouts father, an attorney-at-law, conducts a court case of Tom Robinson, an African-American man who supposedly attacked a girl named Mayella Ewell. Many of the townsmen vehemently appose Atticus choice to protect a black man, and threaten to harm him, as well as his family, throughout the story. Though at the end of the story, Atticus does not win the case, and Tom Robinson dies by getting shot while escaping, this story shows the power of friendship and love of children, family, and neighbors, as well as the consequences of hate, violence, and corruption.
Throughout the course of the story, the protagonist, Scout Finch, and the antagonist, Bob Ewell, both receive both consequences and rewards, while fulfilling their parts in the story. Scout executes her role as the protagonist by telling us everything that happens to her and her brother Jem during the short period of her life that we see. She leaves out no details, and explains everything, ranging from each game she plays, to the tinniest details of the court trial. The antagonist, Bob Ewell, fulfills his role well, though introduced late into the book. Although unsuspected at first, Bob Ewell becomes a horrible man, eventually trying to kill Scout and Jem, since their father defended Tom Robinson. Both figures fulfill their parts well, making this story have a both exciting and unexpected ending.
While not apparent at first, the conflict becomes clear by the end of the book. A reoccurring theme through the end of the story, the conflict looks like that of Bob Ewell trying to make Tom Robinson take blame for attacking Mayella. However, the author hints that the attacker might be Bob himself, though never spoken outright. The conflict becomes resolved when, while trying to kill the children, Bob Ewell dies getting slain by Boo Radley, a neighbor of the Finchs, who has not come out of his house for thirty years. This unexpected twist will delight readers. Harper Lee does a good job of showing the climax, while making the other characters think Jem the likely killer.
Though apparent, the climax of the story unfolds quite unexpectedly. It begins when Scout and Jem, walking home from the school pageant, begin to hear rustling noises. They think the rustler will consist of Cecil Jacobs, a boy who scared them before as a joke on Halloween. Then, Jem yells to run, and a battle ensues. Suddenly, someone helps Jem and Scout, although Scout thinks Jem begins fighting Bob Ewell, who had attacked them. Later, they find out Boo Radley saved them. This portion of the book qualifies as a climax because the readers find out that Bob Ewell becomes the real antagonist, and Boo Radley ends the story as a good person.
To Kill a Mockingbird, overall, results in a great book. Hard to understand at first, since the girl, Scout, has a boys name, but after a while, I liked it. I would recommend this book to anyone who wishes to read a story about children, and their every day life adventures. Through the journeys of Scout and Jem Finch, we can see the joys they experience and sufferings that they endure, as well as the triumphs that they win together, with the love of each other, as well as that of their entire community. Even though many had prejudices against them and their father, Jem and Scout handled them all in different ways, sometimes good, others bad. Never the less, both strive to always accomplish the right thing in every instance. This story of growing up and love of neighbor is a great enjoyment for all.
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Standing up for Truth
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Flash


The book, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is both a delightful and suspense-filled piece of literature. Set in the rural city of Maycomb County during the middle of the Twentieth Century, the story consists of both adventure and thrill. Told through the eyes of Scout Finch, a young girl growing up at the time the story takes place, also the main character, this story has equally classical and real-to-life qualities. Atticus Finch, Scouts father, an attorney-at-law, conducts a court case of Tom Robinson, an African-American man who supposedly attacked a girl named Mayella Ewell. Many of the townsmen vehemently appose Atticus choice to protect a black man, and threaten to harm him, as well as his family, throughout the story. Though at the end of the story, Atticus does not win the case, and Tom Robinson dies by getting shot while escaping, this story shows the power of friendship and love of children, family, and neighbors, as well as the consequences of hate, violence, and corruption.
Throughout the course of the story, the protagonist, Scout Finch, and the antagonist, Bob Ewell, both receive both consequences and rewards, while fulfilling their parts in the story. Scout executes her role as the protagonist by telling us everything that happens to her and her brother Jem during the short period of her life that we see. She leaves out no details, and explains everything, ranging from each game she plays, to the tinniest details of the court trial. The antagonist, Bob Ewell, fulfills his role well, though introduced late into the book. Although unsuspected at first, Bob Ewell becomes a horrible man, eventually trying to kill Scout and Jem, since their father defended Tom Robinson. Both figures fulfill their parts well, making this story have a both exciting and unexpected ending.
While not apparent at first, the conflict becomes clear by the end of the book. A reoccurring theme through the end of the story, the conflict looks like that of Bob Ewell trying to make Tom Robinson take blame for attacking Mayella. However, the author hints that the attacker might be Bob himself, though never spoken outright. The conflict becomes resolved when, while trying to kill the children, Bob Ewell dies getting slain by Boo Radley, a neighbor of the Finchs, who has not come out of his house for thirty years. This unexpected twist will delight readers. Harper Lee does a good job of showing the climax, while making the other characters think Jem the likely killer.
Though apparent, the climax of the story unfolds quite unexpectedly. It begins when Scout and Jem, walking home from the school pageant, begin to hear rustling noises. They think the rustler will consist of Cecil Jacobs, a boy who scared them before as a joke on Halloween. Then, Jem yells to run, and a battle ensues. Suddenly, someone helps Jem and Scout, although Scout thinks Jem begins fighting Bob Ewell, who had attacked them. Later, they find out Boo Radley saved them. This portion of the book qualifies as a climax because the readers find out that Bob Ewell becomes the real antagonist, and Boo Radley ends the story as a good person.
To Kill a Mockingbird, overall, results in a great book. Hard to understand at first, since the girl, Scout, has a boys name, but after a while, I liked it. I would recommend this book to anyone who wishes to read a story about children, and their every day life adventures. Through the journeys of Scout and Jem Finch, we can see the joys they experience and sufferings that they endure, as well as the triumphs that they win together, with the love of each other, as well as that of their entire community. Even though many had prejudices against them and their father, Jem and Scout handled them all in different ways, sometimes good, others bad. Never the less, both strive to always accomplish the right thing in every instance. This story of growing up and love of neighbor is a great enjoyment for all.
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Standing up for Truth
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Flash


The book, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is both a delightful and suspense-filled piece of literature. Set in the rural city of Maycomb County during the middle of the Twentieth Century, the story consists of both adventure and thrill. Told through the eyes of Scout Finch, a young girl growing up at the time the story takes place, also the main character, this story has equally classical and real-to-life qualities. Atticus Finch, Scouts father, an attorney-at-law, conducts a court case of Tom Robinson, an African-American man who supposedly attacked a girl named Mayella Ewell. Many of the townsmen vehemently appose Atticus choice to protect a black man, and threaten to harm him, as well as his family, throughout the story. Though at the end of the story, Atticus does not win the case, and Tom Robinson dies by getting shot while escaping, this story shows the power of friendship and love of children, family, and neighbors, as well as the consequences of hate, violence, and corruption.
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