A Corner of White (The Colors of Madeleine #1)

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A Corner of White (The Colors of Madeleine #1)
Genre(s)
Age Range
12+
Release Date
April 01, 2013
ISBN
9780545397360
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The first in a rousing, funny, genre-busting trilogy from bestseller Jaclyn Moriarty! This is a tale of missing persons. Madeleine and her mother have run away from their former life, under mysterious circumstances, and settled in a rainy corner of Cambridge (in our world). Elliot, on the other hand, is in search of his father, who disappeared on the night his uncle was found dead. The talk in the town of Bonfire (in the Kingdom of Cello) is that Elliot's dad may have killed his brother and run away with the Physics teacher. But Elliot refuses to believe it. And he is determined to find both his dad and the truth. As Madeleine and Elliot move closer to unraveling their mysteries, they begin to exchange messages across worlds -- through an accidental gap that hasn't appeared in centuries. But even greater mysteries are unfolding on both sides of the gap: dangerous weather phenomena called "color storms;" a strange fascination with Isaac Newton; the myth of the "Butterfly Child," whose appearance could end the droughts of Cello; and some unexpected kisses...

Editor review

1 review
An Enchanting New Start to a Trilogy
Overall rating
 
4.3
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
Jaclyn Moriarty has written a book of beautiful prose that blends the contemporary and fantasy genres. A Corner of White was such a dynamic book in so many ways and it was just lyrical and a treat to read.

A Corner of White features an interesting framework - the story is told in alternating chapters between Cambridge, England, and Cello, the other kingdom in the book. Additionally, the book has letters between Madeleine and Elliot and is divided into 12 parts. It was a refreshing format and was a joy to read.

Both of the main characters were very charismatic, despite some of the faults Jaclyn Moriarty reveals about them throughout A Corner of White. The format of the book really contributes a lot to the characters. Seeing them not only through the eyes of their world, but also how they write and what they express to one another really allowed me to get to know them a lot better.

I love the way Jaclyn Moriarty plays with colors in A Corner of White. They mean so much more beyond the simple colors you and me are used to, which was very neat. The world building is phenomenally done and I just love the concept of how the worlds used to know about one another, but now the world as we know it has forgotten the others. Only through a crack is communication able to come through between the worlds. I am hoping in future books some of the particulars of the world Cello are expanded upon, because I thought some were left a bit too murky for my liking.

This was the first book I had read by Jaclyn Moriarty and I would like to check out more by her. I really just fell in love with her writing and her ability to craft characters. A Corner of White was a strong start to what I'd imagine will be a fascinating trilogy.
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User reviews

1 review
Overall rating
 
1.7
Plot
 
1.0(1)
Characters
 
2.0(1)
Writing Style
 
2.0(1)
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Review: A Corner of White by Jaclyn Moriarty
Overall rating
 
1.7
Plot
 
1.0
Characters
 
2.0
Writing Style
 
2.0
Would I Recommend It:

Not really. I'm sorry, but this book is not for me. The protagonist is like, fourteen. Or fifteen. I think Elliot is fifteen, and Madeleine is fourteen. Or something like that. Either way, not mature enough for me.

Rating:

2 stars. Not the best "fantasy" meets contemporary book out there. Definitely meant for tweens. I really can't understand how the overall rating for this book is so high! But that's just me.
Good Points
What I Liked:

The characters were likable. Elliot is interesting, as he is desperate to find his father, while trying to get his father's shop back, and capture a Butterfly Child. Madeleine is... weird. It seems like she is supposed to have some depth to her, but I found her a dry and boring protagonist. I really like Jack, because he is super sweet and empathetic. I was never a huge fan of Belle, but she contributed nicely to the story.

The contrast between the Kingdom of Cello and the real World is nicely written. I liked reading about Cello (even though I was very confused most of the time), because it was not what I expected. It's definitely not your typical kingdom. The Princess columns were... weird, but interesting.
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