The Omega Theory

The Omega Theory
Author(s)
Publisher
Age Range
14+
Release Date
February 15, 2011
ISBN
978-1-4165-9534-2
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The Omega Theory, by Mark Alpert, opens by revealing that despite multiple warnings from the U.S., Iran has tested a nuclear bomb. David Swift, a scientist working for an organization called “Physicists for Peace” is informed of the news when Jacob Steele, a brilliant yet esoteric scientist, interrupted his speech and argues to retaliate with violence, while David strives to convince them to try and work for peace. However, once they have the chance to talk in private, he inquires about the “unified field theory”: Albert Einstein’s last discovery, the Einheitliche Feldtheorie (the Final Theory), was a set of equations that could explain all the forces of nature. David and Michael unearthed it two years ago, but kept a secret due to how dangerous it was. Steele then informs David that the blast from the Iranian nuke was different and much more dangerous than that of any other previous nuclear weapon; his surveillance equipment show that for a split second after the detonation, there was a disruption in space-time, something that has not occurred since the Big Bang. Only those who understand the key to creation (the unified field theory) would know how to destroy it, displaying the significance of the disruption by the Iranian nuke. This showed they knew at least some of the equations, and they must protect the world from the horrific powers of the theory. Joining forces with FBI Agent Lucille Parker, David and Monique race from the Old City of Jerusalem to the deserts of Turkmenistan to rescue Michael and stop the cult’s (the true believers) fanatic leader.

User reviews

1 review
Overall rating
 
4.3
Plot
 
4.0(1)
Characters
 
5.0(1)
Writing Style
 
4.0(1)
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Omega Theory book review
Overall rating
 
4.3
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
4.0
The Omega Theory is a fast paced sci-fi thriller, with interesting high end electronics as the main topic. This original story that jumps right into the action was a very gripping read. I think this book blends fictional and realistic ideas together perfectly, not only citing existing ideas and current technological advances, but also adding some unorthodox theories, incorporating them into the story, fabricating a fantastic, yet semi-believable environment. However, when he adds such a large amount of unusual theories into the plot, it tends to seem a bit unrealistic, such as the idea that X-ray lasers converged on a single point makes the universe “crash”. Another thing I didn’t like about this book was the ending: when it was nearing the resolution, their problems vanish, defeating outrageous odds with tools that just appeared out of nowhere, such as an impossibly superior quantum computer that exceedingly surpasses modern supercomputers, being able to decrypt private keys from public keys in “about an hour”. And this was built by one man, the whole thing kept in a cabinet. Overall, this book was a pretty good book to read.
Good Points
I liked how the book has many uncommon ideas incorporated into it, making the book a much more interesting read.
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