The Baker by the Sea

The Baker by the Sea
Author(s)
Publisher
Age Range
4+
Release Date
November 01, 2022
ISBN
978-1536223897
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If you keep walking over the hills and across the fields, you will come to the edge, where the land meets the sea. And on this edge lies a village. This is my home.

In this village by the sea, a young boy notes the roles that each person in town plays. Everyone is busy: the blacksmith, the boatbuilder, the baker. But most important of all, the boy thinks, are the fishermen who bring in the catch, braving the waves and windy weather to return with the finest, freshest fish. His father is a baker, but the boy wants to be a daring fisherman when he grows up, undaunted by the stormy seas. “Have you ever been to sea?” the boy asks his father. Surely sailing out on the wet and wild waves to feed the town is the most meaningful job of all. More meaningful than a baker. In this softly drawn look at an enduring way of life, Paula White provides a timeless reminder that everyone—and every role—is essential, no matter how small or quiet they may seem.

Editor review

1 review
Not Just a Baker
(Updated: January 01, 2023)
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable)
 
5.0
‘The Baker by the Sea’ by Paula White contains beautiful images that paint a provocative picture of how the roles people play in a town are all important, no matter how they might seem to the naked eye. The young boy in the story is enthralled by the fishermen. He feels they are the most important workers of all in the town, as they catch the fish to bring back to the people so they will have what to eat. While the boy’s father is a baker, he wants what he considers “more” for himself, as he thinks of fishermen as daring, strong, brave individuals.

When the boy decides to ask his father if he has ever been to sea, his father replies that he has been, but it wasn’t for him. He became a baker because he wanted to be a baker. His son, however, wonders why he chose to just be a baker. That word, “just,” is so telling of the boy’s feelings toward his father’s job. He thinks of it as something less—that is, until his father explains to him that if there were no bread, buns, or biscuits, the boatbuilders wouldn’t have what to eat in the café, the fishermen wouldn’t have their biscuits dipped in hot broth and dunked in their tea, and as a result, the fish wouldn’t be caught to be sold and distributed to the community.

Every job is important, and jobs rely on other jobs to make their workers' livelihoods worthwhile and workable. One important lesson stands out from the book, and that is that everyone must take stock of not only what is important to an individual person, but what is important to others. When people learn to empathize with others, the world will be a better, more understanding place.
Good Points
One important lesson stands out from the book, and that is that everyone must take stock of not only what is important to an individual person, but what is important to others. When people learn to empathize with others, the world will be a better, more understanding place.
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