The Story of a Childhood (Persepolis #1)

The Story of a Childhood (Persepolis #1)
Age Range
14+
Release Date
April 29, 2003
ISBN
978-0375422300
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Wise, funny, and heartbreaking, "Persepolis" is Marjane Satrapi’s memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah’s regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran’s last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.

"Persepolis" paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Marjane’s child’s-eye view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, "Persepolis" is at once a story of growing up and a reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, with laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.

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2 reviews
Overall rating
 
4.3
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4.5(2)
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4.0(2)
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Funny/Heartbreaking
Overall rating
 
5.0
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This has been one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever read. It's truly depressing to think of people marching for freedom only to have their revolution stolen by some fundamentalist pigs!

Unfortunately this hits very close to home as the situation here in Egypt bears a striking resemblance to what Marjaine Satrapi tells of her childhood in Iran during the revolution.

It hurts to think that we might en up the same way. With women forced to wear the veil and religion turned into superficial acts to use as a way to oppress and kill instead of enlightening and spreading compassion.

The ending just nearly did me in. I hope things turned out well for Marjane an her parents.
:'(
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A must read!
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3.5
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In one word: Poignant.


For anyone that does not like to approach nonfiction should give Persepolis a chance. It's an interesting look into Iranian culture during the Iranian Revolution. In this edition of Persepolis, the young Marji learns many lessons about life and her culture. She has a unique family situation, so she is raised a bit differently than her peers. Her life experiences and observations help show an outsider what it was like growing up in Iran during this time.


I will admit, I do not know much about the Iranian Revolution or Iraq's invasion of Iran in the 1970s. That was way before my time and I was just a kid in the 1980s. Needless to say, this story was fascinating for me. I was instantly engrossed with what was happening around Marji and within the walls of her home.


Like all graphic novels, there are many details left out. As a reader, you were left filling in the gaps with what was happening outside of her home. Since she was a young child during this time, the information is shared in the perspective of a young child. The adults in her life were the real enlightenment.


I loved the author's humor. Information was given, but it was sprinkled with a kind of wit and insight that made me connect instantly with what was being shared. I could not put this book down, and I consider it a must read.
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