Inventing Ott: The Legacy of Arthur C. Guyton

Inventing Ott: The Legacy of Arthur C. Guyton
Age Range
8+
Release Date
October 01, 2005
ISBN
1893062783
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ATTENTION young readers...Have you ever dreamed of becoming a doctor or a scientist? Perhaps you fantasize about being a teacher of an inventor. Did you ever wonder what it was like to be a soldier, a sailor, a carpenter, a writer, or a ham radio operator? Inventing Ott is the story of a Mississippi boy who grew up to become all of the above and more. It is the story of how young "Ott" Guyton became the legendary Doctor Arthur C. Guyton: Chairman of The Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Father of Modern Cardiovascular Physiology, sole writer of many editions of one of the best-selling textbooks of all time, inventor of the electric wheelchair, dear friend of William Faulkner, and father of ten doctors. But most importantly, it is the story of how a young boy's curiosity and love of learning turned into a lifetime of accomplishments.

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It's Perfect for 9 Year Old Readers Who Love Science!
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5.0
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5.0
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0.0
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Reader reviewed by Shanice Waters (9 Years Old)

I just finished reading this book, and it was great! I love science, but it is sometimes hard for me to understand everything the teachers try to teach me. I wish Jerusha Bosarge (the author of this book) was my teacher. She makes learning easy and fun!

The book is the story of an inventor named Arthur Guyton. His friends and family called him "Ott". He was also very successful at many other things, including having babies. He had 10 children!! By reading this book, I learned how an airplane flies, how vision works, and how blood flows through my body.

Even though my teacher had me read this book for school, I didn't mind reading it at all. I wish all the books I read for school were this easy.
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Who Knew Non-Fiction Could Be This Interesting?
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5.0
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5.0
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0.0
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Reader reviewed by Thomas Perrin

Wow! I am not normally a non-fiction reader, but a friend of mine gave me a copy of this book for my birthday, and I am glad she did. Thanks, Terry! "Inventing Ott" is hilarious, and reads like good fiction should. But, very unlike any of my experiences with fiction, this book gave me a bit of a shock. I was just sitting on my bed, reading the book, when before I even knew what had happened, I had just learned about physics! Then about calculus and anatomy! And I wasnt even trying to learn! It just happened while I was enjoying the story! Maybe I should read non-fiction more often. (Maybe I would get better grades in school, hee hee).

For those of you who have not been fortunate enough to read this book, its about a pretty tough little kid who never really accepted no for an answer. As he grew up, his curious cockiness actually helped him to learn some pretty cool stuff about building and fixing things and about electronics, and pretty much anything else useful that he could learn about in rural Mississippi. Before he knew it, this rough young mans man had become a bit of an overachiever.

His name was Arthur Guyton (Ott, for short) and he grew up, following in his fathers footsteps, to become a doctor (although, I dont think he would have chosen that career if his Dad wouldnt have nudged him to. He seemed to like physics a lot more). Anyway, that doesnt even matter since he never finished his surgery residency. Thats because he was paralyzed by a horrible disease that people used to get a lot called Polio. Eventually he ended up achieving probably ten times more with his life than he would have as a surgeon. He became the inventor of the electric wheelchair, some other medical devices, and some kind of machine used to count particles of radiation in the air. He also wrote the medical textbook that most doctors learn from today. Doctors all listened to him since he also discovered a whole bunch of new stuff about the way our hearts work that no one even suspected before. Who knows how many lives his discoveries about the human circulatory system saved!

Well, he also accomplished a whole bunch of other things, but thats not really what the storys about. Its really about a kid who thought for himself, instead of simply learning all the junk that grown-ups wanted to shove down his throat. Hes kind of like some strange new kind of hero from one of my fiction books&different, because he was real. I wish all non-fiction could be as good as Inventing Ott. I would read anything by this author.
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Inventing Ott - A Fun Biography
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5.0
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5.0
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Reader reviewed by Sally Garrett

Inventing Ott is one of the best biographies I've ever read. The reason it's so different is that the life story is told in many short tales of actual incidents rather than just stating in order the specific points in his life. I particularly enjoyed the tales of Ott (Arthur C. Guyton's nickname) and William Faulkner. The many pictures and diagrams were entertaining and informative.

In summary, this book was a biography about Dr.Arthur C. Guyton, who loved learning, and, in spite of a crippling disease, polio, managed to be a surgeon, military man, inventor, writer, professor,husband, and father of 10 Harvard medical graduates. He is best known for inventing the electric wheelchair and for writing his textbook on physiology. His life would inspire anyone, especially those in wheelchairs.
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