42 Is Not Just a Number: The Odyssey of Jackie Robinson, American Hero

 
3.8 (2)
 
0.0 (0)
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42 Is Not Just a Number: The Odyssey of Jackie Robinson, American Hero
Age Range
8+
Release Date
September 05, 2017
ISBN
978-0763676247
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Baseball, basketball, football — no matter the game, Jackie Robinson excelled. His talents would have easily landed another man a career in pro sports, but such opportunities were closed to athletes like Jackie for one reason: his skin was the wrong color. Settling for playing baseball in the Negro Leagues, Jackie chafed at the inability to prove himself where it mattered most: the major leagues. Then in 1946, Branch Rickey, manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, recruited Jackie Robinson. Jackie faced cruel and sometimes violent hatred and discrimination, but he proved himself again and again, exhibiting courage, determination, restraint, and a phenomenal ability to play the game. In this compelling biography, award-winning author Doreen Rappaport chronicles the extraordinary life of Jackie Robinson and how his achievements won over — and changed — a segregated nation.

Editor reviews

2 reviews
Nice Overview of Career and Life
Overall rating
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
4.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable)
 
N/A
Learning Value
 
4.0
This biography of Jackie Robinson balanced things well. There was information about Robinson's life as a child, which made the historical context of his inclusion on a major league baseball team make more sense. There were enough details to make the story interesting, but not so many that the book got bogged down. The pages were well formatted-- there was enough white space, and the print was not tiny. I always appreciate a good index, and there are even footnotes (which one needs, but which students never consult!). There could have been more pictures--Tam O'Shaughnessy. Sally Ride: A Photobiography of America's Pioneering Woman in Space really spoiled me, and I want ALL the biographies I read to have this many pictures!
Good Points
My favorite books to read in 4th grade were biographies. My elementary school library didn't have many, but there was a section of Childhood of Famous Americans books, and I would take out one a day (I worked in the library during recess-- there's a shocker!) and read it on the back porch at home when the weather was nice. While those books aren't tremendously well researched, they were fun to read. The best biographies hit a balance between those two important things.

I learned a lot of interesting facts, and my readers who want sports books will read ANY sports books, even nonfiction ones. There are a lot of books covering Jackie Robinson's life, however-- I would be even more interested in a book about his brother, Mac, who came in second to Jesse Owens in the Olympics, or about the other African American men who came right after Robinson-- Larry Doby, Willard Brown, Henry Thompson and Dan Bankhead. Until those books come out, I'll definitely have a need for Ms. Rappaport's fine book.
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The story of an exceptional man.
Overall rating
 
3.5
Writing Style
 
3.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable)
 
N/A
Learning Value
 
4.0
Jackie Robinson was an exceptional man, and in 42 Is Not Just a Number, Doreen Rappaport shows readers why he should certainly be celebrated for not only his baseball prowess, but also for his strength of character. Although the book is brief, it succeeds in that mission.

Rappaport brings Jackie Robinson to life by focusing on his childhood, his family, and the struggles he faced growing up in the 1920s and 30s as a strong willed child of color in the days of segregation. Jackie faced injustices everywhere he went, and he fought them in every way he could. Rappaport does a fine job of showing how Jackie Robinson challenged the status quo whenever he faced adversity in the educational system, in the military, and in everyday life. And her portrayal of Jackie-the-fighter offers an excellent backdrop for the time when Jackie was forced to fight, not with words or fists, but with silence and restraint when he became the first black man to play baseball in the major leagues.

42 Is Not Just a Number highlights some fascinating facts about Robinson and his family, and its short chapters help keep the story moving. Although the book is a brief 128 pages, there is a lot of history crammed into it. That said, it would have benefited from some fleshing out of these real-life characters. The second to last chapter highlights the 1947 “Subway Series” between the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, and although Jackie Robinson played for almost ten more years after that, the book ends somewhat abruptly with a final brief chapter that details the final accolades for the man. I know that I was left wanting more, and I suspect young readers who are pulled into Jackie’s story by the narrative up until that final chapter will be disappointed in the lackluster conclusion. I’d also love to see some photos (the cover is great, and the only photo offered)… I’m a firm believer that every non-fiction book targeting youth should be filled with photographs to help illustrate the “realness” of the people and/or events portrayed.

Overall, I recommend 42 Is Not Just a Number for baseball fans and as a supplementary book for middle grades units on civil rights.

My thanks to YA Books Central and the publisher for a copy of the book in exchange for my honest review.
Good Points
Background on an American hero suitable for middle grade readers
Great supplementary material for lesson plans on civil rights
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