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Farewell to Manzanar: A True Story of Japanese American Experience During and After the World War II Internment

Farewell to Manzanar: A True Story of Japanese American Experience During and After the World War II Internment
Publisher
Age Range
8+
Release Date
October 01, 1973
ISBN
0553272586
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Jeanne Wakatsuki was seven years old in 1942 when her family was uprooted from their home and sent to live at Manzanar internment camp--with 10,000 other Japanese Americans. Along with searchlight towers and armed guards, Manzanar ludicrously featured cheerleaders, Boy Scouts, sock hops, baton twirling lessons and a dance band called the Jive Bombers who would play any popular song except the nation's #1 hit: "Don't Fence Me In." Farewell to Manzanar is the true story of one spirited Japanese-American family's attempt to survive the indignities of forced detention--and of a native-born American child who discovered what it was like to grow up behind barbed wire in the United States.

User reviews

3 reviews
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Great autobiographical reader
Overall rating
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable)
 
0.0
Learning Value
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Joey S.

Great book, I always love reading stories of people during wars. Very well written, it was a great idea for Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston to share her story with the world. She told of how during her time at the Manzanar internment camps, she struggled to continue to be proud of her Japanese heritage, finding herself longing to be American, having "normal" round eyes instead of her almond eyes, and just wanting to fit in. When faced with her heritage, as her mother made her become a Japanese lady, she became scared and refused to accept it. She and her mother and siblings had to painfully watch as her father's personality deteriorated until it seemed like he was dead already. Really good read
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So-so
Overall rating
 
3.0
Writing Style
 
3.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable)
 
0.0
Learning Value
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Bookworm9

I read this book in the eighth grade, and I think the reason that I have bad memories about it was that my teacher just dragged it out for way too long, and also didn't ask us to make any historical/ cultural connections with it. It's really not a bad book, a first-person non-fiction account of a girl's experience at a detainee camp for Japanese-Americans during WWII. This is a part of American history that really hasn't gotten a lot of coverage until recently, so it can be a real eye-opener to read. It's a very reflective book, and I remember the girl wrote a lot about her father and other family members. It was pretty interesting.
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Good but kinda boring *yawn*
Overall rating
 
2.0
Writing Style
 
2.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable)
 
0.0
Learning Value
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by rachael

This book is okay it is about a girl and her Jappenese family. This took place during Pearl Harbor...... It is all about history. My teacher made us read a historical fiction book and this was the one I chose! I would not recomend this book if you want to be intertaed. It is more about facts!
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