The Thieving Collectors of Fine Children's Books

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The Thieving Collectors of Fine Children's Books
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Publisher
Age Range
8+
Release Date
March 02, 2021
ISBN
978-1499811247
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Oliver Nelson has a terrible secret-he's a thief.

But he only steals books from the Garden Grove Library that are old, musty, brittle, or incomplete, like his favorite book, The Timekeeper's Children. No one reads anymore, and surely no one will miss them, right? Wrong.

The Pribbles are famous inventors of the most popular toy in the world, alternate-reality goggles. They are also book collectors who are searching for The Timekeeper's Children, so the Pribbles hatch a plan. They invite Oliver, the last person to have checked it out, to their mansion and use special software from their goggles to steal the last remaining copy of the book--from inside Oliver's mind.

Now, Oliver is thrust into the middle of the story and must help the main characters steal pieces scattered around the fictional world of Dulum to build a magical clock that can turn back time before the evil sorcerer Sigil takes over. They'll encounter hideous giants, bloodsucking bats, vicious eels, a Nasty Rodent Eater, a gang of wicked children, and a strange, dark figure that follows them from chapter to chapter, all the while with the Pribbles in pursuit.

Can Oliver save Dulum before Sigil destroys everything? And will he finish The Timekeeper's Children before the Pribbles steal it from his mind?

Editor review

1 review
A Story Within a Story
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5.0
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Oliver Nelson and his father live in somewhat straightened circumstances after the death of his mother, and he takes a lot of solace in reading in the Garden Grove library. Ms. Fringlemeier, the librarian, always has a smile and a book for him, and he immerses himself in books like the Swordflinger Saga. When the Pribbles, who are very wealthy because of their technology business that produces the wildly popular Pribble Entertainment Goggles, realize that the library has a book they want for their collection, they buy the entire library and shut it down. Unbeknownst even to the librarian, Oliver has been stealing books from the library. He has a strict code of what he will take (it has to be in poor condition and seem unread), but one book in his possession, The Timekeeper's Children, is one that the Pribbles want. This book is a particular favorite of Oliver's, even though the last chapter is missing. He no longer has the book, but the Pribbles invite him to their home because he is the last person to have checked out the book. While there, he finds that the Pribbles have a device called a Cortexia that can harvest the book from Oliver's mind. Wearing the Entertainment Goggles, the three are thrust into the story of The Timekeeper's Children.

Written in the 1980s and having sold few copies, this tale of adventure is one of Mr. Pribble's favorites, and he wants to program the tale into the goggles. As Oliver advances through the tale, he meets Jack and Cora, the children of the timekeeper, who are on a quest to steal the crown of the King of Dulum and deliver it to a villain called Sigil. They hope to use their father's clock to turn back time and save their mother. In order to do so, they must work with the narrator, a creature named the Nasty Rodent Eater, and work their way through the story with the Pribbles hot on their trail. They also are shadowed by a mysterious figure whom they find out is the author of the story! They must face bats, eels, the Gang of Impervious Children, and figure out a riddle in order to get to the end of the book. But what is the end? Since Oliver doesn't remember, he needs to figure out what the best ending is for Jack and Cora.
Good Points
This reminded me, in the best way, of Townley's The Great Good Thing, while being a fresh, adventure filled tale. Like Claire, who had the only remaining copy of The Great Good Thing and who had a close relationship with the author, Oliver is determined to save The Timekeeper's Children. I loved this comment that he makes (in the uncorrected proof): "This is my book, too. I created it along the way, making it different and better than the author could ever dream." Claire and Oliver both get to live in the story, make changes, and put important characters in so that they continue to live. It doesn't hurt that the title of Oliver's book is very close to a book my daughter checked out of the public library so many times that I had to buy her a copy. The cover of the 1989 The Children of Time by Deborah Moulton is what I saw in my mind's eye as I was going through this book.

I sometimes find fantasy hard going, and the intricate, interwoven plots were sometimes hard for me to follow, but these will enthrall fantasy readers who would dearly love to read The Swordflinger Saga if they were a real books. Oliver's love of literature is great to see, and his story is one that young readers can imagine themselves into. The Pribbles are delightful villains who are just quirky enough to be interesting and dangerous rather than annoying. The technology of the Entertainment Goggles is fascinating, and also makes a great point about imagination, and how the lure of constantly being connected to a phone or electronic device is damaging the ability of many children to enjoy books and use their imagination.

The Thieving Collectors of Fine Children's Books is a great choice for readers who have a good background in high fantasy books like McMann's The Unwanteds or Anderson's The Dungeoneers, but also for those who enjoy a story-within-a-story novel, such as O'Donnell's Homerooms and Hall Passes, or McKay's The Last Dragon Charmer series. There are several mentions of one of my favorite books as well: Mary Norton's The Borrowers (1952). Perhaps readers will be encouraged to pick up that series when they are finished, but I hope they check it out of the library instead of stealing it!
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4.0
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An adventure within a story
(Updated: August 24, 2021)
Overall rating
 
4.0
Plot/Characters/Writing Style
 
4.0
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N/A
What I loved: The majority of the story takes place within a book that exists mainly in Oliver Nelson's mind. Oliver has taken solace in books in a world where no one reads anymore, and everyone is engaged in using alternate reality eyewear created by the Pribbles. As a result of Oliver being one of the few children left who read, he has drawn the attention of the Pribble's, a couple who are Story Collectors but believe that no child should ever lay their grubby, dirty hands on the books. They believe this so much they developed a machine that eats the stories and wipes them from your mind.

What left me wanting more: Oliver has stolen books from the library, but he always takes ones that are less well-loved and that no one really would wish to, but that leaves him sometimes, like in the case of this book not know how the book ends cause the pages are missing. The missing pages leave us guessing how the book is supposed to end, and we wanted to learn more about what Oliver's imagination can cook up to save the day. I would like to see more of how the Pribble's changed once they realized the error of their ways at the end of the book.

Final Verdict: The thieving collectors of fine children's book contains all the correct elements for a fantastic middle-grade novel. The characters are all well developed and thought out. The villains are cruel and mean but get their just deserts and a chance to redeem themselves. Oliver learns that his imagination can help in a pinch, and the author shines in the uniqueness of the various characters sprinkled throughout the story.
Good Points
An amazing story for anyone who loves stories within a story.
The Thieving Collectors of Fine Children's Books
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