A Blind Guide to Stinkville

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A Blind Guide to Stinkville
Author(s)
Age Range
8+
Release Date
October 13, 2015
ISBN
9781634501576
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Before Stinkville, Alice didn’t think albinism—or the blindness that goes with it—was a big deal. Sure, she uses a magnifier to read books. And a cane keeps her from bruising her hips on tables. Putting on sunscreen and always wearing a hat are just part of life. But life has always been like this for Alice. Until Stinkville. For the first time in her life, Alice feels different—like she’s at a disadvantage. Back in her old neighborhood in Seattle, everyone knew Alice, and Alice knew her way around. In Stinkville, Alice finds herself floundering—she can’t even get to the library on her own. But when her parents start looking into schools for the blind, Alice takes a stand. She’s going to show them—and herself—that blindness is just a part of who she is, not all that she can be. To prove it, Alice enters the Stinkville Success Stories essay contest. No one, not even her new friend Kerica, believes she can scout out her new town’s stories and write the essay by herself. The funny thing is, as Alice confronts her own blindness, everyone else seems to see her for the first time. This is a stirring small-town story that explores many different issues—albinism, blindness, depression, dyslexia, growing old, and more—with a light touch and lots of heart. Beth Vrabel’s characters are complicated and messy, but they come together in a story about the strength of community and friendship.

Editor reviews

2 reviews

Modern day answer to Light a Single Candle
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot/Characters/Writing Style 
 
4.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable) 
 
N/A
Alice is not happy that her family has moved from cloudy Washington state to Sinkville, a Southern town where her father is the manager of the local paper plant that gives the town its distinctive stink. Her father is busy, her mother is depressed, and she needs a ton of sunscreen. It also doesn't help that "back home" everyone knew that Alice had vision difficulties because of her alibinism, and in the new town, she finds herself constantly having to explain. She meets Kerica at the town library and is glad to have a new friend, especially since her old best friend is moving on with her life. Alice is less thrilled with Sandi, who also spends a lot of time in the library. Alice has a lot of trouble navigating the new town by herself, and her brother James has found other places to be, so Alice takes her dog, Tooter, many places with her, pretending he is her guide dog. There is a town writing contest about success stories in the town, and Alice manages to find a lot of them while trying to find her place in the town. She's particularly fond of elderly whittler Mr. Hamlin and gets to know diner owner Gretel and learns about the town's involvement in the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s from Mayor Hank. Alice also tries to help her mother, a former photojournalist, snap out of her depression by showing her the town that Alice is coming to enjoy. There are further complications involving Tooter's health and Alice's school placement, but in the end, things turn out fairly well.

This book has a lot packed into it. A lawsuit, dog health problems AND a mental health breakdown for the mother? That's a lot to address in one book, although the length is still very manageable. While kids will find the issues of moving and blindness to be intriguing, I think that few of them really want to read about the depression of a parent.
Good Points
This was a hopeful book about a middle grade student managing her diverse abilities with a small but devoted support system. Alice feels sorry for herself sometimes, like all middle grade students do, but also wants to show her parents how she can take care of herself. The community is vibrantly drawn and the setting, as well as the town's involvement in the Civil Rights movement, adds a lot to the story. Despite the sad parts, I enjoyed this, and there are certainly characters that represent many different groups of varying interests and abilities.
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Top Marks for A BLIND GUIDE
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot/Characters/Writing Style 
 
5.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable) 
 
N/A
This book is packed with laughter, courage, and friendship from the first page until the last. Alice has just relocated to Sinkville, SC from her cloudy home in Seattle. Her dad has a new job at the local paper mill; her mom has locked herself away in her room, and her brother James keeps running off to the lake, leaving Alice behind. Being born with Albinism and Nystagmus, Alice is legally blind. Legally, but not completely. The only place she can get to and from (with the help of her old dog Tooter) is the library.
It isn’t until Alice’s mom tells her that she’s going to go to a special school for the blind that Alice decides she needs to learn how to be independent (and not different). Entering the town’s "Sinkville Success Stories" contest feels like the perfect way to start. What begins as a way for Alice to learn the layout of her new home ends up being the perfect way for her to make new friends and find her own voice.

What I loved about this book was the way Beth Vrabel handled her diverse characters. While Alice is indeed the main character, there were so many wonderful side stories that Alice captured in her journey to discover Sinkville. People had their own voice, triumphs and struggles.

One of my favorite characters was Alice’s mom. She struggles with depression throughout the book, but rather than avoid talking about her mental illness, the entire family has many discussions about depression, how it manifests, and how it isn’t a quick fix. Their mom is honest about her struggle, and in turn, both Alice and her brother James are able to be honest and open about their anger and fear as they watch their mom battle depression. This is probably one of the healthiest books I’ve ever read when it comes to families talking about their feelings with one another. It was beautiful to witness.

Depression and Albinism are just a few of the things that stand out in this book; there is also a great scene that includes a discussion of Sinkville’s part in the Civil Rights movement. Alice’s best friend Kerica is able to express how she still feels the effect of looking different in a small town. The town comes together to remind everyone that Sinkville is proud of its history supporting all people and offering a safe place for everyone, no matter what they look like.

That’s the beautiful thing about this book: everyone feels like they are too different to have a “home.” By naming and discussing their feelings and struggles, Alice and her friends don’t feel so alone and they’re able to make Sinkville a little bit more like home they'd hoped for.

There were some points where the plot seemed to jump ahead and skip some important details, but the gaps were eventually filled in as the story went along. The humor in this book is nothing short of wonderful, and both Alice and Kerica have that preteen sensibility that makes this book shine.
I would recommend this book to anyone who has felt alone and different. Alice’s story is a powerful example that our differences can make us stronger and that friendships and family can grow into something unexpectedly beautiful.
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