Review Detail

Cub
Kids Nonfiction 83
We've Come a Long Way, Baby!*
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable)  
 
5.0
Learning Value 
 
5.0
Cindy finds that middle school in the early 1970s is fairly stressful-- all the cool girls are wearing elephant bells and blue eyeshadow, but her parents are more conservative and make her wear longer dresses and sensible shoes. She also finds that they encourage her brothers more than they encourage her. She has one really good friend, but that friend starts hanging out with the cool, mean girls. On the bright side, she finds a boy in her class with whom she has a lot in common, and the two hang out and talk a lot. Also, she talks to her English teacher about writing, and her teacher connects her to a local newspaper reporter, a woman, who brings Cindy along to various events and helps her write articles, one of which is published in the newspaper. Cindy manages to make new friends, keeps up with writing as well as photography, and manages to gain the support of her parents for her endeavors.
*For history buffs: The title comes from a very common 1970s advertising campaign that had a feminist bent. Unfortunately, the ads were for cigarettes.
Good Points
The details of school, fashion, home life, and sociopolitical events are all covered in an engaging and interesting way. The fact that this is a graphic novel actually helps tremendously with the understanding of what the world looked like at this point in history. I loved the reporter with the VW Beetle, and yes, Cindy's parents probably would have been totally fine with her tagging along to events all over town with someone she just met. This is a memoir, and Copeland did a great job of informing readers about what the times were like, but also putting in details about how this impacted her own life.

This was rather poignant-- in the 1970s, writing was still something that one could use for a career without too much difficulty. I considered a career in journalism myself, but now I am always worried for journalism majors!

This was definitely a white, middle class story, but also a great feminist one. I'd love to see graphic novels about people from various cultural backgrounds, and if they are also historical, so much the better! This is a great way to administer historical information to readers who might shy away from novels.

Like Holms' Sunny books, this one made me ridiculously happy, since it covers a period of time during my own childhood. Will probably purchase at least two copies. I do sort of wish the cover were avocado green, though. Or maybe purple. Or orange. Better if it were a plaid of all three-- that would have captured the colors of the time! I was a little surprised that girls wore jeans to school; we weren't allowed until 1976.
Report this review Was this review helpful to you? 0 0

Comments

Already have an account? or Create an account
Powered by JReviews

FEATURED GIVEAWAYS

Latest Book Listings Added

Prophecy Untold (Shadow Realms book 3)
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
Finding out my mother was taken by the demons...
Hearts, Strings, and Other Breakable Things
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
In this charming debut about first love and second...
Six Goodbyes We Never Said
 
3.3
 
0.0 (0)
Two teens meet after tragedy and learn about love,...
Golden Crown
 
4.3
 
0.0 (0)
No longer only a warrior. Not just a queen....
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
The first vampire. The last Nephilim. The end...
The Galactic Adventures of Hazel - Gurecoa
 
3.0
 
0.0 (0)
What is it like to live in 4519 AD...
Batman: Nightwalker (The Graphic Novel)
 
4.3
 
0.0 (0)
This action-packed graphic novel based on the New York...
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Seventeen-year-old Rose Hemmersbach aspires to break out of small town...
Stuffed
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
Welcome, little one. You have been chosen to join us,...
Estranged #2: The Changeling King
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Enter a world of faerie magic and epic adventure in...
The Edge of the Word (Mightier than the Sword, #2)
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
The exciting follow-up to Mightier Than the Sword, the humorous...
Write to Me: Letters from Japanese American Children to the Librarian They Left Behind
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
A touching story about Japanese American children who corresponded with...

Latest Member Reviews

Eden's Escape
 
4.0
"After Eden's Wish, the title character has been allowed to live outside the lamp while she is granting her 999..."
Eden's Escape
 
5.0
"I had the opportunity to read both ‘Eden’s Escape’ and Eden’s Wish’. They are both installments in the ‘Eden of..."