Review Detail

Saving a mystical island
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot/Characters/Writing Style
 
5.0
Illustrations/Photos (if applicable)
 
N/A
After Narkazan's defeat in Atlantis Rising, the immortal warlord is back because the Veil of Peace is shredding. Sammelvar and Escholia are worried about their son, Promi, whom they sent to Earth to keep him safe. He's still irritate about that, but cares deeply about his sister, Jalady. He also cares deeply about Atlanta, who is keeping the Starstone, the weapon that defeated Narkazan, safe on Atlantis. When Jalady is kidnapped by Narkazan's mistwraiths, Promi goes into the spirit world to find her, and has many problems. He is captured by his old nemesis Grukkar but saved yet again by by the monk Bonlo, who helps him escape. The two manage to do away with Grukkar, but Bonlo doesn't survive. Meanwhile, in Atlantis, five years have passed. Because Promi had inadvertently rescued a ship captained by Reocoles, he and his crew settled in Atlantis, and the machinist made many "improvements" to the infrastructure there. Shagri, Lekko (one of Reocoles sailors who ends up living at the bakery) and her father, the baker, hold firm against the improvements in technology and are not afraid to speak out when they realize the extent of the devastation to the forest. Shagri is kidnapped by Reocoles after she tries to thwart him, as is Atlanta. After his set to with Grukkar, Promi has been rescued by Ulanoma and fights the mistwraiths. He is successful, but Narkazan's dark gift is delivered to the forest of Atlantis, and it will not be long until there is even more evil to fight.
Good Points
Barron is a master craftsman of fantasy worlds. Not only are there convincing forces of evil and a variety of nefarious creatures who must be fought, there are also sentient tree houses, plenty of tea with honey, and bowers fragrant with lush flowers. It is interesting to see how the "improvements" in Atlantis make the inhabitants happy, but are definitely leading to its downfall. There are rich details about mythical creatures, such as Kermi, a talking monkey-like creature, and Theosor, a wind lion who is very helpful and gives Promi much comfort, as well.

Promi is understandably angry at his parents, who removed him from the spirit world in order to maintain his safety on account of a prophecy. He comes to realize that he has many jobs to do on earth to keep Atlantis and those he loves safe, and grudgingly comes to terms with them. Shagri is a feisty character who is fully grounded in the mortal realm and whose father makes a mean cinnamon bun. I imagine that Lekko, who is rescued from Reocoles Greek ship, will play a more major role in the next two books.

What I appreciated most was how organized the plot was, and how efficiently the first book was recapped. I often struggle with remembering what happened in previous books in fantasy series, but I was able to get into this right away, and follow what was going on even though the adventure went back and forth between the spirit world and Atlantis. Not many fantasy books are this clear and concise!

Readers who enjoy high fantasy books in the manner or Tolkien, Lloyd Alexander, Tamora Piece, and Ursula LeGuin but who also want to explore the fascinating story of Atlantis, will enjoy Promi's adventures as he struggles against both Narkazan and technology to save the mystical island of Atlantis.
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