The Selection

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AMAZING BOOK
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
The selection was an amazing read, heard a lot about it but didn't know it was this amazing. first of all the characters was well written, totally love prince maxon and aspen, can't decide which one I like best. and lots of drama happens in this book which makes it interesting and the love triangle is amazing, cant wait to read the next book in the series. A BIG ROUND OF APPLAUSE FOR KIERA CASS, AMAZING
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The Selection
(Updated: April 22, 2018)
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
The Selection by Kiera Cass is unlike any book I’ve ever read. Reminiscent of The Bachelor in setup, but taking place in a post-war world, the novel follows a young woman named America whose life is suddenly uprooted when, after applying for what is perhaps the most prestigious event in the entire country, she is selected to be part of The Selection: a journey in which thirty-five young women will find not only themselves, but the man of their dreams.

For America, who goes into The Selection heartbroken from a recent breakup while at the same time hopeful for her future, she feels this may be a chance to give back to the family that has loved her so much. What she doesn’t realize is that her journey will change her, for what seems to be the better.

This book is incredibly hard to describe without going into intricate detail about the world-building and the methods at which Kiera Cass created it. For that reason, I will simply say that, at it’s heart, The Selection is a novel about one young woman coming to find what she wants rather than what the world expects of her. One line—I choose me—rings true in the darkest hours of the final pages, and though many would believe this novel to be a one-trick pony based simply on its pretense, its world-building and ability to inspire tension through events not relating to the romantic overtones is enough to immediately mark this as a contender among great young adult novels.

Addicting, harrowing, saddening at times and joyous at others, The Selection is an unstoppable novel, one which fans of romance and post-war worlds will instantly fall in love with.
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Light-hearted and brilliant!!
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
I loved the Selection, it was way better than I thought it would be. Sooooooooooooo much better. From the cover, it looked like it be very fancy and girly, which I hate, but it was very different from that, but still with touches of that girly magic, as well as humour and a tiny bit of action.

When I read the name America Singer, I was confused. It was such a weird name, since I think they were living in a future America, and that she sings. It was a really weird name, as with most characters in the book. But I guess the names give this book a certain charm to it.

I thought the plot would be all dresses, make up and paparazzi. But it was different, it did have the dresses and a bit of paparazzi, but it had shy romance, friendship and action. Yes, action. Rebels attack the palace regularly, which brings a little excitement into the story.

The Selection is so much better than expected, for everyone. I believe that everyone should give it a shot, and you will be blown away with this amazing book.
Good Points
-I laughed out loud when America kicked Maxon in the groin.
-I loved how America didn't want to be queen, and she wanted to know about the rebels, it made me like her a lot. She was a great protagonist.
-I wanted to get to know the other girls in the selection better.
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Dystopian meets every girl's princess fantasy = brilliant!
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
This was an amazing book. Light-hearted and fun, with some romance and a bit of action, the perfect protagonist, one forbidden love, a cute prince and 34 girls vying for his hand... what could go wrong?

Well, I am going to put it out there. What was Cass thinking when she chose the name America Singer? Who lives in America... and is a singer? Really. I mean, they are living in the future, but that's a bit pushing it. And the name Aspen reminded me of aspirin. Just putting it out there.

When I was reading the blurb, I was thinking something along the lines of "I think I'll read it first, to get it over and done with." It just sounded all a bit too fairy-tale like and fluffy princesses and spoilt girls and paparazzis and stuff. And of course, there was some of that, but it all worked beautifully, not annoyingly like I suspected it might. It had all the pretty dresses (I took special care to imagine the dresses :P), the spoilt girls (one in particular... grrrr you, Celeste), and the paparazzis, and the prince, with the shy romance, but it all worked.

I am definitely going for Maxon. He seems so sincere in his emotions, and friendly and nice (and of course it doesn't hurt that he is the Prince). I really hope that America chooses him. But she loves Aspen, who is right there in the palace as well, after he broke up with her just because he didn't want her to support him. So poor Maxon. He's so nice. But I can't believe he kept Celeste. But anyway.

America is a great protagonist. She doesn't even want to be queen, and she wanted to know about the rebels, she stood up for her maids, and was just generally outspoken and... just great. I burst out laughing (not that breathy sound you do when something's kind of funny, actual laughing), when she kneed His Royal Majesty The Prince in the groin. :D

If you're looking at the cover/blurb of this book, and thinking "Ummm... looks a little too princessy for my taste..." Don't exit this page. Trust me. America is not princessy at all.

I advise everyone to give this book a go, it is so good. I can't believe I have to wait until April for the next one!!!
Good Points
- America is a great protagonist
- Definitely not the fluffy princess drama I was expecting
- This is an amazing book
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You know what worked? Going with the flow, going in with no expectations.
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
On a serious note, I adored The Selection by Kiera Cass. The story Cass tells is unconsciously magnetic, unexpectedly so. My attention gravitated to this interesting world of classed citizens and a young girl full of deliciously romantic and almost-there fantasies for her future and the prince who eagerly hopes to make a Love Connection and take a wife while still maintaining honor and respect—of himself and the girls who come to join the party, so to speak.

~These characters are named WHAT now?~

Our main character is America Singer and I just love that ridiculous name, because Cass gives an explanation I can enjoy and while I have yet to see the girl totally grow into what her name represents, I can see potential for the fire I expect later events in the series will coax and set ablaze. America is slow and thorough in her realizations, but she’s honest and as up-front with herself as she can possibly be while wading through her confusing and angsty feelings. That honesty I appreciated, because the last thing she wants to do is lead anyone on—friend, love interest, anyone. There are no cringe-worthy lies or pages and pages of doubt-filled text, which was refreshing.

Aspen, Maxon. Maxon, Aspen. Cass quickly, despite what we are well-aware is bound to happen, manages to spin this intoxicating and alluring dream of what Aspen and America’s future could be like. The whims of the young girl’s heart and her naïve hope that love will conquer all—even poverty—have us willing to believe that Aspen and America can and will be the happy poor couple still deeply in love despite their circumstances. And then those dreams are rudely ripped away and we’re into The Selection and suddenly Prince Maxon is looking like a delectable escape from the anguish. Back to America’s honesty, she is nothing but forthcoming with this handsome, adorably awkward prince hoping, like her, that love will come along and endure any future chaos, and, unexpectedly, a swift friendship forms full of secrets and advice-swapping and startling romantic sparks that shouldn’t have any place in America’s still-mending heart.

~Oh, the tragedies of the heart… Is there a romance here?~

One would think a love triangle would be obvious here, but… Who am I kidding? There IS no but. This love triangle between Maxon and America and Aspen is destined to bring pain and scars, because the two guys who come to mean so much to her are both genuinely good guys, both worthy and beautiful choices in their own ways.

Aspen’s worries and sorrows are shattering and real and honest, because how can a marriage between two differently classed citizens work out and survive the overwhelming and consuming poverty sure to weigh them down? His family is already suffering, and his responsibilities are endless and burdensome being the only remaining male to take them up on his deeply weary person. He loves America, wants to be selfish and hold on, but, at the same time, how can he bring that kind of hopeless life to someone he loves when he can choose differently?

But selflessness can prove tragic and wrenching because his doubts lead America right into The Selection, and, eventually, encourages her sinking into the competition, because how can she face the man who turned her away and smashed her lovely crystalline dreams? Reluctance does nothing to discourage the girls from rudeness and suspicion, and doesn’t hold her back from becoming involved with Prince Maxon. What starts out as a sweet friendship, in which comfort, secrets, little quirky details, and tenderness layer their connection, leisurely turns into something more despite the urgency of Maxon’s decision-making. Maxon develops an advantage, because although it’s easy to fall for Aspen, we get to know Maxon and all his endearing qualities and experience his relationship with America as it grows.

~Is this REALLY a dystopian?~

This is a light dystopian. And people have been saying that and it may be irritating others because the definition is elusive. The Selection by Kiera Cass has touches of dystopian in the caste system and its effects on the citizens, and in the rebellion that’s attacking with a vengeance those who uphold that system.

Really, though, The Selection by Kiera Cass is more about the actual Selection than anything else, and the budding romance that develops as a result. The TV show, the 35 girls in the competition… it takes on more of a charming Cinderella-type themed story. What if Cinderella’s Prince, instead of dancing with a bunch of women looking for his bride, took part in a competition in search of her? These girls are NOT mandated to go and be part of the competition, and can indeed decide. There really isn’t a resemblance to The Hunger Games. This isn’t a hardcore dystopian. This is a dystomance fairy tale retelling hybrid that is way more appealing, and isn’t so much fluff, because the emotion is there, dark and deep, but The Selection by Kiera Cass is fun in a way and almost cheerful. All the women are treated like princesses and so there are lot of fabulous dresses, parties, and other entertaining things amidst so the story is exciting in a girly sort of way.

~So I, like, totally loved this story?~

I didn’t quite love this story, but adoring a book is one step under. It’s the kind of awesomeness that inspires grins and snickers and some SERIOUS mushiness. The Selection by Kiera Cass is full of tender moments and characters that incite attachments. With The Selection nearly over but not quite, it’s hard to contain my anticipation of what turns could possibly twist up the next story. Engaging, enjoyable, and fun, The Selection by Kiera Cass is a delightful relief.

Originally posted at Paranormal Indulgence, 4/27/12

Looking for something similar? You should try Cinder by Marissa Meyer and Amanda Hocking's Trylle series.
Good Points
Peeps, The Selection by Kiera Cass so rocked my heart! Surprised? I was too. After all, there are only so many negative reviews you can take before you start to get worried. But you know what worked? Going with the flow, going in with no expectations. I figured, 'Asher, let’s not go into this book expecting some hardcore dystopian book with ALL THE CRAZY.' Besides, I wanted a love story. And, at The Selection’s core, that’s EXACTLY what I got, and I basked in it, burrowing into the promise of new love while dutifully, though miserably, resisting the temptation of love nearly lost. It also does help that the characters grew on me, The Selection part is coolness; and the tide of the story had me digging right in.
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Fun, fluffy princess romance with just a hint of dystopia
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
This book was just fun. I really don’t understand the constant comparisons to The Hunger Games. Yes, they’re both dystopian, but The Selection is VASTLY different from The Hunger Games. America and Katniss are nothing alike, except that they’re both kind of socially awkward. There is no violence (except for a subplot involving rebels that keep attacking the castle for no reason the monarchy can understand). The families in the lower castes may go hungry, but the world doesn’t feel nearly as impoverished and depressing as the Districts of Panem. And while the losers of the Hunger Games die, the losers of the Selection go home to wed prominent businessmen and politicians.

So yeah. Not the same thing.

No, the pop culture phenomenon The Selection most closely resembles is The Bachelor. A bunch of pretty girls trying to win the hand/money (or in this case, crown) of a studly guy. There’s even camera crews and a weekly televised broadcast.

But whereas I can’t stand The Bachelor, I absolutely LOVED The Selection.

Beyond just the abundant prettiness (and there WAS abundant prettiness), this book just gave me happy fluttery feelings in my tummy. America was fun and feisty. Sometimes a bit dense, yes, but that’s when I had to remind myself (as I have to do often in YA books featuring female protagonists) that she is a teenage girl, and so it makes sense for her to be a bit dense.

Prince Maxon was sweet and charming and I’ve got to say, I know the whole point of the book was that America has two viable options in Aspen vs. Maxon, but I am Team Maxon all the way [I can't believe I just said that]. Aspen is stoic and intense and responsible and B-O-R-I-N-G. Granted, we don’t have nearly as much time to get to know him as Maxon, and most of our perception of him is through America’s lovesick and swoony eyes, so I will try not to be too disappointed if she runs back to him in Book 2. But I sincerely hope that Maxon is the victor.

There is a brief attempt to explain how the country of Illéa came to be, although the caste systems are never explained. Maybe in Book 2? I found the explanation reasonable enough. I know there are others out there saying they didn’t buy or understand it, but in the context of the story, and especially since America is narrating in first person and she herself doesn’t fully understand it all, I thought it was fine.

And while there’s very little action or nail-biting suspense in this book (unless you consider a will-they-or-won’t-they romance nail-biting suspense), I still found myself completely enthralled in the beauty of the Palace, the developing relationship between America and Maxon, and the tentative friendships between the girls in the Selection.

The only thing I wasn’t a fan of was the ending. I wanted there to be MORE. Even though I knew it was going to end without resolving a lot of things (since my friend who loaned me the book warned me of as much), I was still sad and surprised when I hit the last page and still had questions. There’s a lot of subplots (and main plots) left hanging at the end. Consider yourself warned.

I think The Selection isn’t so much for Hunger Games fans (although I am a Hunger Games fan) as it is for fans of stories like The Princess Diaries or anything by Jane Austen. Or, obviously, fans of The Bachelor. It’s a fun, sweet, and highly entertaining romance, and the future dystopian setting adds some interest and uniqueness. I enjoyed it immensely.
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A Great Page-Turner!
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0

My rating: 5 stars.

This book was AMAZING.

I initially got interested in it because it reminded me of something else that I read a couple of months ago. This book got me hooked almost instantly. The first few chapters were a bit slow, which may be due to my immediate dislike of Aspen, but once we got to the actual Selection I couldn't stop reading. The way Kiera Cass slowly evolved America and Maxon's relationship while creating character development for all the other characters was remarkable.

Yes, there is a love triangle aspect in this book, but I think it's done in a way that's different from other novels. We see both relationships develop and it's not something that came out of nowhere. The book is just really interesting. I finished it in two days and on the last day I just sat there reading it for about 3 hours straight. I can't wait for 'The Elite
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Where Can I Sign Up?
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
My first thought: this is just like The Hunger Games. My second thought: this is so much better than The Hunger Games. Yes, better, but still hauntingly similar. It's no secret that this book is a Bachelor and Hunger Games mash up, but it was done very well.

Plot: The ever present love-triangle. Usually, I'm really decisive on who I like better, but this book made it really hard. At the beginning, when she and Aspen (her current boyfriend) are together, I was thinking, there's no way I could ever want her to be with that stupid prince. Now, I 'm not so sure.

But there is a major difference from The Hunger Games that I am very pleased with. We don't know if she's going to win. If you've read HG you can't tell me that you didn't know Katniss was going to win. It was obvious. If she died we wouldn't know who won. But here, I honestly have no idea because she says flat out from the beginning, she's not there to win. It ends in a major cliff hanger and I'm dying to read The Elite (which comes out next spring).

Characters: Remember how I said it was just like The Hunger Games? Well it is, even down to the characters. Aspen is just like Gale, the brooding best friend left behind. There's the guy who does all of the interviews (Gavril/Caesar), the slightly or overly peppy coach (Silvia/Effie), and you could even say the mean girl from a higher class (Celeste/Clove). I wasn't really drawn to any of the characters because I'd read them all before. Prince Maxon is quite charming though. America is a great main character and I often found myself giggling at her name in context. (I love you, America! and What am I to do, America?)

Genre: So I wanted to bring up a point about the way this book was written. It's a dystopia, but there was a major difference from all the other dystopias I've read. We all know Katniss as the fiery leader of the rebellion against Snow/Coin. You may know Cassia and how she stumbled up the rebellion with Ky.

But America has no part in the rebellion. She has no problem with her country Illea, sometimes talking about the parts she likes. There is a rebellion though. Unlike all of the others, its threatening her, and she's not the heroine that saves the country. I thought that was a nice twist a stereotype of the genre.

Overall: I finished it in a matter of hours. I got it from the library when I was done for the day and I was done before I went to sleep last night. (I do this quite often though...) I'm a sucker for chick lit and this had a healthy dose of romance in it. I've also been on a dystopic kick right now, so I found this book absolutely charming, despite the ever present thought of HG there.
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Ignore The Controversy
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
A good start to a series. I admit I'm one of those people that hate reality TV shows, especially "The Bachelor" and "The Bachelorette". I abhor those shows and I go out of my way to avoid them. So, when I was attracted to this cover (look how pretty it is) I hesitated when I read the synopsis. It did sound remotely like one of those TV shows but I gave it a chance.

I'm glad that I read it because I ended up really enjoying it. Some people say that it's too much like "The Bachelor". Yes, it does have similarities, but I wouldn't go as far as saying they're the same thing.

America Singer is apposed to the idea of becoming a princess. She is in love with a boy from her neighborhood so she doesn't see the point of trying to fall in love with Prince Maxon. She only ends up going to the "competition" because in doing so, her family will be compensated in money and status. What unfolds between all the competitors and the Prince, I'll let you find out for yourself, but I will tell you that America's reason for staying close to the Prince changes with time.

With all the controversy surrounding this book, it's bound to get very good and very bad ratings. Before joining one camp, read the book and make up your own mind. We live in a free world, not a dystopian one like in "The Selection", so try to think for yourself and give your OWN opinion.
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Nice mix of fairy tale and dystopian world!
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
I’m team Maxon all the way!
Good Points
First off, thinking that this has a mix of fairy tale and dystopia is also what made the whole story interesting. Fairy tale that it gave me what I felt for most fairy tales finding their beloved princess or princess-to-be, marrying a handsome prince like Prince Maxon then ruling a kingdom this lady never thought she’ll ever be – and dystopia for living in a futuristic world of wars against the Northern and Southern rebels mostly from the lower castes who are hungry for wealth and survival. The dystopian world however hasn’t been explored much aside from the warring of the rebels in the palace since it’s focused on The Selection itself.

The Selection, as the title says, is about the grandest event in the kingdom of Illea (the new USA after the world wars) where the prince will choose among the 35 Selected his soon-to-be-wife-and-princess of Illea. These ladies go through stages of etiquette and historical classes with co-Selected ladies, public appearances and sweetest bonding with Prince Maxon to get to know him and prove to him that one of them is going to be a worthy princess to win his heart and support him in ruling the country.

Then as one of the Selected, we meet America Singer, our lady protagonist who’s a Five (next to average caste Four; Fives belong to people who work to entertain through music and art) is the Selected’s crowd favorite despite her stubbornness, mood swings and temper which made her way to the top and to Prince’s heart.

It’s great that I’ve also read The Prince before this that I’ve come to know Prince Maxon’s POV about The Selection, The Selected and how he felt about them especially America. It made me like him more when he stood by his decision as a man to accept her request despite the circumstances. In saying this, I knew The Selection won’t just be a simple choosing and survival of the most educated and beautiful but an almost real life heartwarming experience. :)
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