The Fault In Our Stars

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9 reviews with 4 stars
60 reviews
 
78%
 
15%
 
5%
2 stars
 
0%
 
2%
Overall rating
 
4.7
Plot
 
4.6(59)
Characters
 
4.7(59)
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4.8(60)
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Beautiful and heartbreaking
Overall rating
 
4.0
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
4.0
It's easy to see why this became such a hyped up popular novel. It was very well written and the characters were complex and intriguing. It is very easy to read in one sitting, which does not diminish how beautiful the novel is.

Green writes amazing, intelligent characters.

Read this if you are in the mood to cry.
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Could have Been Better
Overall rating
 
4.0
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
4.0
This book is amazing, but there are some things that don't make sense. It is a tear-jerking novel about two teenagers with cancer, who talk like 60-year-old librarians. I understand test this is to enhance the idea of them looking at life as if really is, but they are still teens. Let them talk like they are. There should have been more humor; there where little to no moments when you sat there laughing for a moment after Gus cracked a joke, only after his extreme moments of cockiness. There were also no moments when you were excited after a plot twist, because there were none. The idea of the plot was good, but the way it was delivered could have been better. Don't get me wrong, I respect John Green and love his work, but this one could have been better.
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Enjoyable "sick-lit"
(Updated: February 01, 2015)
Overall rating
 
4.3
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
All last year I felt guilty for not having read The Fault in Our Stars by John Green. How could I call myself a YA fan and not have read such a popular book? Well, today I remedied that situation. Start to finish. Cover to cover. Quite a lot of Kleenex.

At its heart, The Fault in Our Stars is a teenage love story set against the backdrop of cancer. Hazel drags her oxygen tank everywhere she goes and Augustus has a prosthetic leg. Both are erudite, witty, and converse in a fashion that I’ve never heard teenagers sound like ever–and I’ve been around a lot of smart teens. Like, literally, I’ve never heard teens talk like that. Still, the Gilmore-Girl-esq dialogue is fun to read, although if it doesn’t come across as realistic.

If you enjoy tear-jerkers, this is a great book for you. If you’d rather not put yourself through an emotional wringer, stay away. The only thing that bothered me was Augustus and his unlit cigarette. Hopefully that doesn’t spawn a fad of cigarettes becoming cool again even if they aren’t smoked.
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Amazing book
Overall rating
 
4.3
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
In The Fault In Our Stars by John Green, he builds a story out of darkness and despair. He takes the tragedy of cancer and immerses us in the lives of characters that could very well be real. Many know of the heartaches in dealing with those who fight the fight, and many of those scars last a lifetime. He brings his story in the form of a teen girl, Hazel Lancaster. Stricken with cancer from a young age, she believes she has come to terms with what her life has become. Then she meets a young man, Augustus Waters, a survivor of cancer. He is drawn to her in a way that is initially uncomfortable, and as she tries to push him away in her sarcastic vein, he finds her to be exactly the type of girl he has been looking for. For cancer touches not just the victim but all those who have loved and are in anyway touched by them. One should be prepared for a story of romance, anger, excitement and humor, and friendship and bravery for that is the way we are led as Green develops the personality of a group of teens that have the courage to bring both laughter and tears. Hidden within that strength they also hide the depression and hopelessness as they try hard to protect their family and friends by showing only the smiles and strength whenever possible. The friendships as well as the depths the families go through preparing for the worst while holding out hope is like a beacon of light.
The courage and humor, the energy and sadness all keep you on a roller coaster of emotion. Green takes you on a journey both terrible and beautiful.

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another good book by john green
Overall rating
 
4.0
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
4.0
I've been liking most of his stuff actually
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The Fault In Our Stars
Overall rating
 
4.3
Plot
 
3.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
The Fault In Our Stars by John Green is a beautiful, heart warming book which should be read by every teen out there.

The Characters in the book, you can't help but love them. The fantastic humour between Augustus and Hazel is just a joy to read, and you love being able to be with these two people and be able to see them grow as a couple. The fact they both are victims of cancer, makes the whole thing more special and the way they se life and death is an inspiration. The ideas that you should enjoy the moment and not look at how and when you will cease to be and enjoy the moment when it lasts.

The plot isn't a ground breaking plot, but it is fine to show the special connection between Hazel and Augustus. The way this book has also ben written is a joy to read and the whole read was effortless and it's a book that can be read many times.

Overall, this is a very deep and brilliant book which fantastically explores the boundaries between living and dying and is a joy to read.
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Achingly Beautiful
Overall rating
 
3.7
Plot
 
3.0
Characters
 
3.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is an impelling novel narrated by a sixteen year-old lung cancer patient, Hazel Grace Lancaster. The book is about the misfortunes she will be facing while on a trip to Amsterdam with her boyfriend Augustus Waters, who has amputated his right leg due to bone cancer, and is in remission. Hazel and Augustus then travel to Amsterdam to search for Peter Van Houten, the author of their favorite book, An Imperial Affliction. While returning from the trip Augustus reveals some bitter news to Hazel, which drives the story plot to a turning point.
I genuinely liked the sassy narration of this story. Unfortunately as the strength of the book, it also was a weakness: there were times when Hazel and Augustus sounded smarter and savvier than any sixteen-year-old I’ve ever met; even the other characters sometimes shared this abnormal cleverness. As much as I liked Hazel and Augustus, and found them ravishing, I also felt that I could see the author’s shadow in these characters. “It does not taste like God himself cooked heaven into a series of five dishes which were served to you accompanied by several luminous balls fermented, bubbly plasma while actual and literal flower petals floated down all around your canal-side dinner table.” It was constantly in a metaphorically significant action and words, to the extent of being pretentious. There was a certain ingenuity within this narrative, its ironies and references to other cancer books, as well as its sarcastic puns.
Despite its humor and cheekiness, The Fault in Our Stars is definitely a tale of star-crossed lovers, and will surely bring you to a wailing end.
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The Fault in Our Stars
Overall rating
 
4.0
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
4.0
While I wasn’t blown away by this one as so many other were, I did really enjoy it. I read it through in three sessions, interrupted only by sleep and classes. I didn’t cry which probably makes me a horrible person, especially since I’m a total cry baby, but I was still moved by Hazel and Augustus’ story. The Fault in Our Stars deals with a very tough, sad subject, but overall it didn’t feel sad. There were some very sad parts, hence the expectation to cry, but there’s the theme of hope weaved throughout the whole story.

I’ve noticed that all of John Green’s main characters seem to be quite pretentious. Hazel is no exception, but I like that. She may be dying of cancer, but she still displays humor, cynicism, brains, and caring. She even falls into some of those stereotypes of how people treat cancer patients, which she hates. I absolutely loved Augustus from the moment we met him! He’s hilarious and sweet and just completely loveable.

The one thing I did not like about this book was the whole Peter Von Houten plot. He played an important role in the story, but at the end I found his actions very unbelievable and just irritating. I know a lot of the plot couldn’t have happened without him, but I still just didn’t like it.

I’m never really sure how to review Green’s books. He’s obviously a talented writer, and I do enjoy his books. I just don’t know what to say without spoiling anything! The Fault in Our Stars is heartwarming, funny, sad, moving, so many things in one. I’m not familiar with the cancer process, but it felt like a very realistic portrayal with ups and downs.
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One of His Best
(Updated: April 07, 2012)
Overall rating
 
4.3
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
If you have never read a book by John Green, I highly recommend reading this one first because it is by far his best one yet. Reading his other books first actually takes away from the story. Why?

Because John Green is repetitive. You will find similar, witty teenagers who can throw their extraordinarily clever comments back and forth without a moment's thought, though underneath their perfection they are broken and confused, and know, understand, and memorize classical poetry, literature, music, etc. It's a common link between his books, and I found myself continuously drawn out of the story to think, "Hmm... that seems awfully familiar." If this had been his first book I read, I would've given a better rating, because I wouldn’t have known his characters quite yet. Oh, sure, they all have their own philosophies and beliefs, but their general personalities are making me simply bored.

That said, The Fault in Our Stars is a wonderful story, which, while it may not have the most original plot yet (count all the YA books that have protagonists dealing with cancer and romance), he does make it his own by incorporating his own elements in to it. This means his standard fare of life-changing journeys to discover the meaning of life (or something similar), and lovable, dorky characters. I don’t want to give anything away, but it is not your typical cancer book—it is fun and adventurous, but of course, as teenagers dealing with cancer, Hazel and Augustus will have those moments where everything is just awful. The way they deal with death is markedly different from what you read in other books, especially near the end, where there are some truly heartbreaking scenes—some of the best I have ever read.

People who hate crying while reading books will probably take one look at the summary and think, “Cancer. Bye.” But I seriously recommend giving this one a chance. John Green does not write books about how depressing cancer is, though, of course, elements like that are thrown in. He writes about life and about surviving and fearing it. If you’re still not convinced, try this sample line:

“Whenever you read a cancer booklet or website or whatever, they aalways list depression among the side effects of cancer. But, in fact, depression is not a side effect of cancer. Depression is a side effect of dying. (Cancer is also a side effect of dying. Almost everything is, really.)
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