The Fault In Our Stars

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60 reviews
 
78%
 
15%
 
5%
2 stars
 
0%
 
2%
Overall rating
 
4.7
Plot
 
4.6(59)
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4.7(59)
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The Infinitely Affecting Story of Hazel, Augustus and Side Effects Of Death
(Updated: March 22, 2012)
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
"Whenever you read a cancer booklet or website or whatever, they always list depression among the side effects of cancer. But, in fact, depression is not a side effect of cancer. Depression is a side effect of dying. (Cancer is also a side effect of dying. Almost everything is, really.)"
-- a small slice of the affected wisdom of Hazel Grace, from The Fault In Our Stars by John Green.

Seemingly everybody, regardless of personal interest, occupation, social situation or general background, carries a list of books with such personal and cultural importance, resonance and transcendent ability to shape thoughts and ideas that may be dubbed as "essential". For many, such literary classics as Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Orwell's 1984 and Salinger's Catcher In the Rye are permanently engraved on this list. Perhaps, for others, Sendak's Where The Wild Things Are or Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy have mattered so much in the lives of their readers that they, too, are deemed essential. Regardless of exactly which books reside on these lists, what is truly important to highlight is how each and every one of these "essential" texts have been a transmutable participant in the journeys of the lives of countless individuals.

Which brings me to The Fault In Our Stars; John Green's sharply written, smartly balanced and, of course, essential tale centered around the "epic love story" of two teenager's suffering from the unfair, unpredictable and unrelenting human condition of dying from cancer.

For fans of Mr. Green's previous novels (Looking For Alaska, An Abundance Of Katherines and Paper Towns), the author's identifiable use of witty and pointed dialogue is utilized to great effect as he illustrates the stubborn strength in two individuals who refuse to be defined by their disease. Yet, while Hazel and Augustus are perceptively conscience of the strangeness of their lives, they sweetly cultivate and develop an intense and sagacious connection that is, altogether, distressingly endearing, deeply touching and genuinely heroic.

Stylistically, what Mr. Green surely excels at is never allowing the pulse of the narrative to get repetitive or predictable. Rather, the author is wonderful at unsettling the reader throughout at just the right moments. Just as he has in previous novels, Mr. Green utilizes a character revelation, from the perspective of the protagonist, to shift the paradigm and introduce a new sense of crisis and focus within the tightly directed narrative while still maintaining an honest sense of truth in the voice of the speaker.

Ultimately, Mr. Green possesses the enviable ability to articulate such a satiable level of understanding that unequivocally makes the journey of his stories an acutely unique experience. The Fault In Our Stars is a relentlessly engaging, humorous and affecting tale that will undoubtedly shape ideas, inspire action, influence personal conceptions and inevitably be called "essential".
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Captivating. Heartfelt. Heart warming...and most of all, REAL.
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
Captivating. Heartfelt. Heart warming...and most of all, REAL.
And also a bit scary.
But not scary in the way you think. It's scary because it's so real.
That is so true. Honestly, I've had this book for a long time now. I actually got it a few days before we found out my mama was sick with cancer. Of course, after I found out, I didn't want to read the book. Because reading this book would have just made it all to real for me. Months went by and I had friends always asking me if I had read it yet or even saw the movie. My answer was no, of course. After my mama passed (a few months ago) I thought "well, maybe I can read it now.." I think I read maybe a page before I started crying and had to put it back up. So, on my shelf it has been collecting dust. Every time I would go to get a new book to read, I would actually grab it first, but then I would put it back and get another one. I thought I would never be ready to read it. Till a few days ago my sister got me to sit down and watch the movie (yes, I watched it... and cried so hard I couldn't catch my breath.) But, that was the push I think I actually needed to get passed this. I don't know how else to say it. I mean, when you lose someone so close to you, you really don't want to open up, you don't want to talk about it and you DEFINITELY don't want to hear or see the word "cancer" (If that's what the person as passed from)
If you know me at all, you know I HAVE to read the book before I ever see the movie, but this time, I'm glad I watched the movie. It prepared me and set me on course to read the book. Which I ended up devouring.

TFIOS is probably the most real book I have ever read and has made the most impact on my life. Never would I ever think I would find a story more beautiful than Romeo and Juliet. But here it is.
I loved everything about this book. The story, the writing, the honest truth of it all. John Green opened the door on cancer and reveled the honesty of it. It's not easy, fun, or something that you can just shrug off. It's hard, ugly, and world shattering. But what's so amazing about this book is that he not only showed how hard everything is, but he also showed beauty and love through characters having to live with this and their families being there through it all.

This is a book I would recommend to everyone and if I could rate it a million billion trillion stars, I would for infinity. Lol
Good Points
That's the thing about pain. It demands to be felt.
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Dear John Green, How Are You So Wonderful?
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
In a strange way, I always sort of dread reading anything by John Green. Weird, right? See, I live in perpetual fear that one day he will let me down and his book will be less brilliant than I'm expecting. My expectations when it comes to John Green are ridiculously high, because, basically, he's like the god of the nerds and, even in the books I like less, his writing makes me laugh and makes me feel. Despite this constant fear, his books have, so far, improved every time, with The Fault in Our Stars being his best yet, dark and funny and honest and touching and hopeful and depressing and painful and perfect.

*wipes away tears*

When people talk about this book, the first thing they mention is the sadness of it, of how many tissues are requisite to getting through this novel without emerging a snot monster at the end. What struck me much more strongly, though, was the sense of humor and optimism running through the book, even the darkest moments. The humor doesn't subtract from the pain or the suffering; it humanizes it, and enhances the strength of the characters.

In the past, my main complaint about John Green's books (no, I did not think they were all completely perfect) were the characters. They were real, but they were annoying and repetitive (especially with Paper Towns and Looking for Alaska. None of them did I fall completely in love with, although Tiny Cooper was close. In Hazel and Augusta, John Green's characterization has seriously hit its stride in my opinion.

Hazel's voice is just...incredible. Her sarcasm, her brutal honesty, her anger, her intelligence and her wit all made her one of the most wonderful narrators I've ever encountered. I love the way she phrases things. I love that she uses some words that I don't know the meaning of, which really doesn't happen often in my reading. Hazel feels wholly like a kindred spirit, like we would be friends if we ever met, which would totally never happen since we're both so anti-social. Also, she feels one hundred percent like a female to me, always a remarkable thing for a male author to accomplish.

Hazel and Augustus meet and there's an immediate attraction. Though they immediately feel for one another on some level, John Green deftly doesn't go anywhere near instalove territory. For one thing, there's Hazel's cancer, which holds the two apart. Even if there weren't and they immediately leaped into a relationship, I would have been okay with it, because the two legitimately develop a bond. They wisecrack and have this insane rapport; they share a love of word play and navel gazing. They trade their favorite novels and both go into the experience with an open mind, even though the novels were not what they were expecting. They are, without a doubt, one of the best, most convincing, most well-matched couples I have encountered in fiction.

Throughout The Fault in Our Stars, John Green has woven a lot of thoughts about the value of fiction and about what a novel really is, both to the reader and to the author. Hazel's favorite novel, An Imperial Affliction by Peter Van Houten, is a work of literary fiction about a young girl with cancer; Augustus' is a series of novelizations based on a video game about the adventures of Staff Sergeant Max Mayhem. While there's clearly a difference of literary merit between the two, I loved how John Green stressed the importance of both.

I feel like there isn't much more that I can say about this without cutting into your enjoyment of the book. I realize I didn't talk about the cancer at all, but I suppose that was intentional, because the book isn't so much about the cancer as about the people who are partially made of cancer. The cancer is them after all, not a foreign element. The book is wholly about cancer and wholly not, though I know that probably doesn't make any sense. What I mean is that this is in no way simply some weepy tearjerker stereotype of a cancer book.

My words are failing me, so I leave you now with this: The Fault in Our Stars is everything I dreamed it would be and more. John Green constantly increases his awesomeness. With this novel, he will break your heart, repair said heart a few sizes larger, make you laugh, give you hope, rip your heart to pieces again, and basically tell you the utter truth about a lot of awful things also known as life.
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The Fault in Our Stars (A Room with Books review)
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
This is the first book I've finished in under 24 hours in longer than I can recall.

I don't feel like an adequate review for a book such as this can be written, so I'll just say this: The Fault in Our Stars is beautiful and heartbreaking, but not just because something Sad happens. It mad me think and it made me appreciate the life I have a little more.
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Couldn't put it down!
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
At first I thought it was going to be a boring book. But as i got into it more it was amazing! John Green had me at every word! Hazel was my favorite character. I felt as if i was right with them the entire time. (Which if I was that would be a little awkward in some scenes of the book!) It didn't get slow after the beginning at all, which is great I hate it when books do!
Good Points
John Green is awesome!!!
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Bring the tissues - it's going to be a sad one
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
I've been avoiding writing this review because I just don't think my tear ducts can handle it. But I need to do it because this is honestly one of the best books I have ever read. This is the first book by John Green that I have read, and I enjoyed his style immensely. His writing is witty and elevated, which only furthers the point that the main character is smart beyond her years. Hazel has cancer, but I could tell she is an old soul, forced to deal with circumstances that no teenager should. There are some main characters that I just can't stand in books because their wit turns into snark which turns into an annoying attempt at portraying teen angst. John Green drove the line between funny and obnoxious with perfection. There wasn't any point in the novel where I felt Hazel was a brat or annoying to listen to. In fact, all I wanted to do was hear her thoughts and keep reading to uncover her heartbreaking story.

Now on to the boy...Augustus Waters. At first I wasn't sure about him. Is he an arrogant jerk or is he that know it all guy you kind of love to hate? I quickly realized neither were true. I didn't ever want to hate him. Yes, he may be overly confident, but his heart is too large for him to be a jerk. He's the guy that was meant for Hazel and in their relationship you find a perfect story.

For me it's easier to write bad reviews than good ones. Because I just don't have much to say besides this book is amazing and you should read it immediately. My absolute favorite part of the book was when you realize why it's called The Fault in Our Stars. I won't give it away because its something you should read in the book.

And lastly, tissues are required for this. My face was a puddle of mascara when I was reading. The last hundred pages were the worst and I had a steady stream going for the entirety of them. But it was worth it.

I recommend this book for anyone who can read...seriously.
Good Points
Emotional
Funny/Witty
Augustus Waters
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Absolutely breathtaking
(Updated: August 01, 2013)
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
There are so many things I want to say and so many feelings bursting in my chest, and yet I have no words. There are so many reviews out there that express my thoughts better than I ever could, so please bear with me.

The Good

This is not a cancer book. It is the story of two people who have cancer, but it is not a book about two kids who have Cancer with a capital "C". Okay, that's confusing. Let me try again. It's about the people (Hazel and Augustus and Isaac, and, to an extent, everyone else in the "Literal Heart of Jesus") and who they are and how they see the world and life and death and themselves and each other. It's not just about the circumstances they are living in.

Author John Green doesn't pity the characters or pussyfoot around the hard topics, of which there are many (dying, afterlife, sex, cancer, etc). He isn't afraid to make it hurt, and he isn't afraid to be a touch insensitive, at least to the sensitivities of those who so often cringe when topics and people are treated with anything other than kid gloves. I think that was what I loved best about Hazel and Augustus—they said what they thought in the way that best suited them. It wasn't that they didn't have a filter; it was simply that they said things as they felt them. Life's too short to censure. It was like Hazel repeatedly argued; they weren't braver or stronger just because they were "cancer kids", they simply were living regardless of the circumstances.

I was completely in awe of John's craft and his unbelievably strong-yet-fiercely-real characters. The way Augustus and Hazel consider their identities and their mortality and the purpose of existence and love was so heartfelt and fresh and unlike anything I'd ever heard before. So many times, I had to stop, completely in awe at the wonder of it; at the knowledge that somewhere out there, someone — John Green — is thinking this profound ideas without the prompting or guiding hand of an author or a tell-them-like-it-is narrator.

The Bad

Did I mention the open weeping in my office? Really, I couldn't find a flaw in this book if I tried. I can't even wish Augustus and Hazel and Isaac health because it would destroy the greatness of this work and diminish the impact it had on me and countless other readers.

The Bold and the Beautiful

I listened to the audiobook of The Fault in Our Stars, so I didn't get to highlight all of my favorite moments, but here are some I managed to jot down:

“As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.”

“Thank you for explaining that my eye cancer isn't going to make me deaf. I feel so fortunate that an intellectual giant like yourself would deign to operate on me.”

“It's hard as hell to hold on to your dignity when the risen sun is too bright in your losing eyes."

“What a slut time is. She screws everybody.”

"You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world, old man, but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices. I hope she likes hers."

The Grade

5.0 / 5.0

I highly recommend that if you have not yet read The Fault in Our Stars, you do so at once. Better yet, listen to the audiobook. I typically read quickly to discover what happens, and listening to the book really made me focus in on the words themselves, and the experience was one of the best literary moments of my life. No exaggeration.
WA
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Realistic Perfection. This will have you turn into a sobbing ball.
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
Steph’s Review:
Words cannot describe how much I loved this book. I have never cried so much in a long time, and nothing is even close to how heart-wrenching this book is. It is just Flat. Out. Amazing. As my friend Angie would describe it, it was just...beautiful. This book is a lot different from books I usually read, probably because of it’s realism. Cancer exists, and right now we can’t do anything to stop it. The Fault In Our Stars is very touching, and within the span of it’s pages, John Green was able to fully connect his characters and world to me as if they’d been there my entire life. I actually wasn’t expecting this to be as good as it was, but I listened to the awards and raves it got and gave it a shot. I had no regrets that I started read this from the very first chapter.

At just 13 years old, Hazel Grace was diagnosed with thyroid cancer which metastasized to her lungs. By some miracle, a cancer-treating drug perceived to ineffective became her savior, and halted the growth of any new tumors in her body. However, Hazel is and will be tethered to an oxygen tank for the rest of her life, because her lungs simply won’t be “good lungs” anymore. She’s practically given up. It’s not exactly a good situation, because anything “normal” for kids her age is now out of her reach, or so she believes.

During a fateful meeting at the Cancer Support Group, Augustus Waters barrels into her life. He’s hot, one legged, funny, and hopeful. Cancer-free and in remission, Augustus Waters is what cancer patients hope to be one day. With his sweet talk, he gets right into Hazel’s nerves and shows her that living with cancer doesn’t take away who you are. You just have to make the time meant for you your own infinite, your type of forever.

John Green, amazingly, was able to put so much humor into this book despite it’s serious topic. I don’t even know how many times I LOL’d while I was reading it, and contrary to my personal belief, he can write romance. Augustus is such a sweetheart, and he’s pretty darn arrogant and hilarious. I love him, enough said. He’s a bright highlight, both to Hazel and to The Fault itself. Despite his near flippant attitude, he is one of the wisest characters in the book, and provided more support to Hazel than her parents ever could. Hazel’s first mindset is that she’s just an ugly nobody, waiting to rot in a grave, but Augustus makes her feel and become someone beautiful. John Green, through this book, tells everyone that there isn’t anything wrong with hope, and it’s one of the strongest feelings a person can have.

Back to the crying part. While this book was happy-go-lucky for the first 2/3, a surprising twist made my whole world come crashing down like a meteor plummeting towards Earth. I was kind of expecting it to happen, but it was still surprising nonetheless because I didn’t want it to happen, I was hoping it wouldn’t. The ending of The Fault was as heartbreaking as it was heartfelt. There are so many life messages hidden between the pages that inspire you to be better. It was pretty bittersweet, but still hard to handle. I read too much paranormal stuff, when there is always a HEA. I cried at least three times within the last 100 pages, no joke. I could not get over this book for days, and me and Angie (mentioned above) blubbered over this book for a while. A long while. I once had to write an essay for school on the book that most changed my life and I chose to write it on Kira-Kira by Cynthia Kodohata. If I had to rewrite that essay today, The Fault In Our Stars would have been my top choice instead. This is definitely a must read for adults and teens both.
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Book for the Soul
Overall rating
 
4.7
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
I have read this book so many times I just may have it memorized. I LOVED this book and the story of Hazel and Gus. It was a typical love story, nor was it a typical cancer book. This book made normal love stories boring. This book had so many quotes and lines that just hit my soul and haven't left me.
Good Points
Hazel Grace made it so that cancer wasn't portrayed like it is in any other story. She made it real, she made it hurt, she made it hard hitting. When Hazel meets Augustus, their stories of cancer fade into the back of your mind. These two just wanted to be normal, but knew of their limitations. Finding a dream and pursuing it, no matter what disease, sickness, or hard times was an essential part in their lives.
The writing was so deep and made you cry and laugh in a single page. The characters were beautifully written.
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One of His Best
(Updated: April 07, 2012)
Overall rating
 
4.3
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
4.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
If you have never read a book by John Green, I highly recommend reading this one first because it is by far his best one yet. Reading his other books first actually takes away from the story. Why?

Because John Green is repetitive. You will find similar, witty teenagers who can throw their extraordinarily clever comments back and forth without a moment's thought, though underneath their perfection they are broken and confused, and know, understand, and memorize classical poetry, literature, music, etc. It's a common link between his books, and I found myself continuously drawn out of the story to think, "Hmm... that seems awfully familiar." If this had been his first book I read, I would've given a better rating, because I wouldn’t have known his characters quite yet. Oh, sure, they all have their own philosophies and beliefs, but their general personalities are making me simply bored.

That said, The Fault in Our Stars is a wonderful story, which, while it may not have the most original plot yet (count all the YA books that have protagonists dealing with cancer and romance), he does make it his own by incorporating his own elements in to it. This means his standard fare of life-changing journeys to discover the meaning of life (or something similar), and lovable, dorky characters. I don’t want to give anything away, but it is not your typical cancer book—it is fun and adventurous, but of course, as teenagers dealing with cancer, Hazel and Augustus will have those moments where everything is just awful. The way they deal with death is markedly different from what you read in other books, especially near the end, where there are some truly heartbreaking scenes—some of the best I have ever read.

People who hate crying while reading books will probably take one look at the summary and think, “Cancer. Bye.” But I seriously recommend giving this one a chance. John Green does not write books about how depressing cancer is, though, of course, elements like that are thrown in. He writes about life and about surviving and fearing it. If you’re still not convinced, try this sample line:

“Whenever you read a cancer booklet or website or whatever, they aalways list depression among the side effects of cancer. But, in fact, depression is not a side effect of cancer. Depression is a side effect of dying. (Cancer is also a side effect of dying. Almost everything is, really.)
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