Paper Towns

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11 reviews with 5 stars
24 reviews
 
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Great!
Overall rating
 
4.7
Plot
 
4.0
Characters
 
5.0
Writing Style
 
5.0
All of John Green's book have one thing in common: they are incredibly hard to put down. Like seriously, I stop my life when I get a hold of one of Green's books. Another thing they have in common is a boy that makes me want to wish upon every shooting star. These dudes are great! Quentin and his friends are some of the funniest guys ever!
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A-Maze-Ing!!!!!!!
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
0.0
Writing Style
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Jill at The O.W.L.

Ok I'm going to get this a bit brief because I'm afraid I'll give things away if I say too much!  I really liked this book.  Right from the beginning when Margo climbed in Quentin's window, I was hooked.  I had to know more about these characters.  I will tell you, I didn't always like Margo.  She seems selfish at points, but I think I needed to think that, so I felt some of the conflict that Quentin felt.  And at times he frustrated me as well! But what made this book amazing was to watch the changes take place in Quentin as he searches for Margo.  He learns so many things about life and people - things we all need to learn.  And on a personal note,  I really liked that what helped him gain these understanding was the poem "Song of Myself" by Walt Whitman, one of my favorite poets! (I named my dog after him!) Through the lines of this poem, Quientin learns how to truly look at the people around him.  It's very clear he hasn't been doing that. And it held up a mirror to how I live my own life.


As Quentin and his friends set out in search of Margo, I felt his urgancy and his need to find her. So when the final scenes play out, I felt all he did as well.  It was a roller coaster ride, but one I'm glad I took.



Final thoughts: Boys can relate to Quienten, and we can all relate to what he learns.



Best stick with you image: The fish exploding in the car.



Best for ages: 15+ at least due to mature language and scenes.
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Love, Love, Love!!!!!
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
0.0
Writing Style
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Melyssa

Quentin Jacobsen has an ordinary boring life and that is just the way he likes it.  That is until his neighbor/girl of his dreams, Margo Roth Spiegelman shows up at his window, just 24 days before graduation.  After a night of adventures, full of righting wrongs, punishing the wicked, and breakings very separate from enterings, Margo disappears.  This begins the greatest adventure of Quentin, the boy next door.  Aided by his best friends, Radar and Ben, they embark on a search for Margo and learn that perhaps they never really knew her at all.


 


I read a lot of books and many of them are very disappointing.  That being said Paper Towns was a pleasure to read.  John Green masterfully tells the story of Quentin and his adventures.  Full of humor, intrigue, and a wistful sort of love, Paper Towns is the real deal.  You will find yourself tearing through the pages of this book, enamored of the journey.  In truth, this review cannot possibly do this book justice, so if you are looking for a supremely wonderful reading experience, pick up a copy of Paper Towns, sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride.

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A Must Read
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
0.0
Writing Style
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Christi

I loved Paper Towns By John Green.
  John Green writes with such amazing wit, and irony. Paper Towns danced between serious issues, and lighthearted observations so flawlessly.
 The Character of Margo Roth Speiglman was crafted so wonderfully imperfect, I had to read it until the very end.
 I love how Walt Whitman wove in and out of the story line. It coincided beautifully with the stories' message and meaning.


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Very Believable
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
0.0
Writing Style
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Mairi

Q is surprised when Margo Roth Spiegelman shows up at his window and invites him on a midnight jaunt around town, but he goes. That night, in between spray-painting an M on the house of Margo's cheating ex-boyfriend and shaving off the class bully's eyebrows, Margo takes Q to the top of the SunTrust Building to look out over downtown Orlando. She says that it is a paper town, and that she (much to Q's distress) is a paper girl whose last string has just broken.


Several months ago, a friend talked me into reading Looking for Alaska and I enjoyed it, so I was happy when I saw this book sitting on the shelf in my school library, though not as happy as I was when I began to read it- Looking for Alaska may well have been as good, but I don't remember that. I really did try not to read it during class, but I couldn't help myself. This book is a quick read in the sense that it doesn't take long to finish, but I couldn't stop thinking about it after I closed the book.


I know a lot of high school students prefer to stay away from realistic books set in high schools, but even they should read this one.  

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A Stunning Look at Teenage Life
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
0.0
Writing Style
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Kathleen

To Quentin Jacobson, his neighbor Margo Roth Speiglemen has always been an enigma. Even at the age of nine he thought that she was the most wonderfull girl he knew. His miracle. As they grew up, they grew apart. He became a band geek who couldn't actually play any instruments and she became the daring and dangerous girl that everyone in the school knew and loved. One night, Margo shows up at his window dressed in black and announces that they have something to do. Quentin spends the best and longest night of his life getting sweet revenge on the people who've made his life miserable and breaking into SeaWorld. He's so sure that this night will change the way Margo sees him but when he goes to school the next morning, she's gone. Convinced that Margo would not just run away without telling anybody where she was going, Quentin begins to follow a series of cryptic clues. But he soon realizes that maybe Margo didn't want to be found so much as understood.

I. Loved. This. Book.

I'm so used to reading fluff that takes cookie cutter teenagers and plops a dab of magic on to cover up the fact that the story is really about nothing. I've generally tried to stay away from non fantasy Young Adult fiction because it all seemed to be chick lit. The sugar cookie life without the magic. John Green has opened my eyes to a new genre that i can't even begin to name. This book is real.

He took all of the pitfalls that comes with being a high schooler, all of the muddled up emotions and relationships, all of the dumb high school boy stuff, all of the parties that you don't get invited to, the friends that you're only with because it's convinient, the pain and excitement of graduating, scooped it all up and stuck the most fascinating girl right in the middle who just wanted to get away from it all. This book wasn't about cliques, who's dating whom, or what she did to stab so and so in the back. It's about understanding people past the thin protective layer they put up to survive in high school. It's about reaching out to the people that you don't think need to be reached out to.

This book also had a million and one heavy quotes in them that make you want to stare at a wall and mull over your life for awhile. One of my favorites is this;

"Look at all those cul-de-sacs, those streets that turn in on themselves, all the houses that were built to fall apart. All those paper people living in those paper houses, burning the future to stay warm. All the paper kids drinking beer some bum bought for them at the paper convenience store. Everyone demented with the mania of owning things. All the things paper thin and paper frail. And all the people too. I've lived here for eighteen years and I have never once in my life come across anyone who cares about anything that matters." -Margo Roth Speiglemen

Read this book. It will change the way you think of young adult fiction.
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Mysterious and AMAZING!
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
0.0
Writing Style
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Lauren

John Green's Paper Towns is the story of tested friendship and finding your way in life. Quentin and Margo have been neighbors and used to be very good friends when they were little. As the years went on, they made their own friends and didn't have much to do with each other. Secretly, Q has always had a huge crush on Margo.

It's a surprise when she shows up at his bedroom window late at night requesting him to be her driver for 11 things she has to do that night. Reluctant at the late hour, Q finally agrees and is kind of excited to hang out with Margo. He drives her through a series of pranks where she gets revenge on her cheating ex-boyfriend and his other girlfriend, her (now ex-) friend, and causes other havoc. On the journey, for the first time in a while, Q sees what he believes to be the real Margo.

Margo didn't show up the next day at school, or the next or the next. Q discovers that she ran away, and he ends up finding clues that he thinks she left for him to find so he could find her. He's afraid she is (or is going to be) dead from suicide, so with the help of his friends he begins a search. Through looking for Margo, he learns more about the foundations of his friendships with he buddies, and eventually learns about himself.

This story is just an all around wonderful read that has a lasting impact on the reader. It was great and I'd suggest it to EVERYONE!


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Paper, paper, paper.
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
0.0
Writing Style
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Krista

Quentin "Q" Jacobsen is in love the perfect Margo Roth Spiegelman. One day, Margo shows up at Quentin's window, and together they play pranks on Margo's enemies. The next day, Margo has disappeared. Soon, Quentin finds clues left by Margo, and his quest to find her begins.

I absolutely loved Paper Towns. I could not put this book
down, and I ended up finishing it in three school days. Usually, with
school, it takes me at least a week to finish a book. The book was
witty, meaningful, and just plain fun. The deeper meaning was my
favorite part of the novel. Because of the similar theme, Paper Towns strongly reminded me of The Great Gatsby. In fact, after I finished reading The Great Gatsby and Winter Dreams
(a short story also by F. Scott Fitzgerald with the same theme) for
English last semester, I could not stop thinking how people wrongly
perceive other people as idols or perfections. Now, I am experiencing
the same feeling.


Green also seamlessly wove symbols into the story. One example is
the black Santas that Radars parents collect. I actually did not catch
this one while I was reading. How did I find out about it, then? By
looking at a vlog by John Green. I dont know how many of you have seen
it, but if youre interested, its at the end of this post. Another
thing I enjoyed about the novel was the inclusion of interesting
tidbits. The obvious one is paper towns, specifically where Margo
disappeared to. Omnictionary was also a clever name, and I enjoyed Leaves of Grass too. Paper Towns is now one of my favorite novels.  

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Stellar Love/Mystery/Adventure Story Redefines YA Lit
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
0.0
Writing Style
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by Stephanie

The brilliant John Greens third novel starts off quietly, then builds to a roaring finish that sets a new bar for all young adult literature.

After years of running in different social spheres, towards the end of senior year, Quentin Jacobsens childhood friend, next-door neighbor, and unrequited love, the beautiful and eccentric Margo Roth Spiegelman, enlists him to help her in what becomes the wildest night of his life. However, just when he thinks he and Margo are on track to be friendsand maybe something moreagain, she disappears, leaving some clues behind for him to wonder about.

Quentin is convinced that following and figuring out the clues will lead him and his friends to Margo. What happens next, then, is an epic, unforgettable journey of self-discovery, humanity, adolescence, friendship, and love.

What could be a typical detective plot is brought alive at the hands of the witty and talented John Green, but this book is so much more than a simple mystery: youll want to read it again and again to discover all the philosophy, themes, and lessons Green has packed into this novel, as well as to laugh again at the many hilarious moments. I thought that LOOKING FOR ALASKA couldnt be topped, but I am proved wrong. With PAPER TOWNS, John Green establishes himself as the premier young adult author, one to which every other person will be compared to.
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interesting and provocative
Overall rating
 
5.0
Plot
 
5.0
Characters
 
0.0
Writing Style
 
0.0
Reader reviewed by the book muncher

Quentin Jacobs has always loved his beautiful and wild next-door-neighbor Margo Roth Spiegelman. Their childhood friendship has all but disappeared by high school, yet Q is content to observe Margo from afar. Then one night, Margo climbs through Qs window, inviting him to join her on a vengeful adventure, and, ignoring practicality, Q accepts. However, the next day, it becomes apparent that Margo has disappeared. Worried and confused, Q is desperate to find Margo. But as he follows the obscure clues his mysterious Margo has left for him, Q realizes just how little he knows about the girl he thought he knew so well. In this wonderfully written novel, Green explores the connections between friends and what it means to be alive.

Paper Towns was a fantastic mix of mystery, suspense, and profundity, and all in a completely natural way. I loved the flow of this story; all the separate memories, clues, and dreams were seamlessly interwoven. The characters, their wants, feelings, and actions were very realistic, as was, surprisingly, the unique plot. My opinions of this novel may be slightly skewed because this was just my kind of story; its got pranks and mischief, a search that leads to deep questions about identity, and a little bit of romance. I especially liked the mix of entertainment with emotional depth. Having a deeper meaning always adds a little extra to a story, and I felt the one in Paper Towns was only magnified by its nearly universal relevance. This novel shows the dangers of assuming you know someone better than you actually do and disputes the fine line between selfishness and being true to yourself. If there was one fault within this novel, it would be that Margo was so difficult to understand, even after the story was completed, although this could also have been calculated in to increase Margos enigma. Im tempted to say Paper Towns was pretty close to perfect, but some readers may dislike some of the repetitiveness and lack of extremely high action in the plot. Overall, though, I immensely enjoyed this well-written and thought-provoking novel.

Paper Towns was a great combination of the best aspects of literature, although in moderation. It will be enjoyed by all readers, because its about things that actually matter to teens; fans of Maureen Johnson, Alyson Noël, and even Ellen Hopkins will also appreciate Greens realism. I look forward to reading Greens other novels, Looking for Alaska and An Abundance of Katherines.

reposted from http://thebookmuncher.blogspot.com
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