Spotlight on Fade To Us by Julia Day, Plus The Importance of Autistic Characters in YA, & a Giveaway!

Screen-Shot-2018-02-09-at-10.35.33-AM

Today we're excited to spotlight Fade To Us by Julia Day! Read on for more about Julia and her book, plus theimportance of autistic characters in YA, and a giveaway! 

 

Meet Julia Day!

 
 

JULIA DAY lives in North Carolina, halfway between the beaches and the mountains. She has two twenty-something daughters, one geeky old husband, and too many computers to count. When she's not writing software or stories, Julia enjoys traveling to faraway places, watching dance reality shows on TV, and making a dent in her To-Be- Read pile. Julia is the author of YA contemporary romances The Possibility of Somewhere and Fade to Us (Feb 2018). 

 
 
 
Meet Fade To Us!
 
 

Julia Day's Fade to Us is a story about found families, the bond of sisterhood, and the agony and awe of first love.

Brooke's summer is going to be EPIC— having fun with her friends and a job that lets her buy a car. Then her new stepfather announces his daughter is moving in. Brooke has always longed for a sibling, so she’s excited about spending more time with her stepsister. But she worries, too. Natalie has Asperger’s--and Brooke's not sure how to be the big sister that Natalie needs.

After Natalie joins a musical theater program, Brooke sacrifices her job to volunteer for the backstage crew. She’s mostly there for Natalie, but Brooke soon discovers how much she enjoys being part of the show. Especially sweet is the chance to work closely with charming and fascinating Micah--the production’s stage manager. If only he wasn't Natalie's mentor...

When her summer comes to an end, will Brooke finally have the family she so desperately wants--and the love she's only dreamed about? 

 

 

3 Reasons Why:
The Importance of Autistic Characters in YA 

I was on a recent visit to a local high school, standing before an auditorium full of teens, answering questions about being a writer. Midway up the aisle, a girl sat quietly, surrounded by empty seats that created a buffer zone from the others. When I mentioned that my next book had an autistic heroine, the girl became visibly animated. After the bell rang, her classmates filed out, but she made a beeline for me.

“I have high-functioning autism,” she said. “And I can’t wait to read a book with an autistic character—who’s a girl!”

Her excitement reminded me why I wanted to write an autistic character for my next young adult (YA) novel. My daughter also has Aspergers. As a teen, it was nearly impossible to find books with autistic characters. And when we did, they weren’t female.

Diverse characters are appearing more often in books and pop culture marketed to teens, and that’s great. But I still hope for more. Here are three reasons why we should continue to push for autistic characters in YA.

Teens on the autism spectrum deserve to see themselves in YA. Both my daughter and the girl who approached me want to read books they can relate to. They shouldn’t have to work so hard to find characters like them in fiction. People on the autism spectrum have stories that ought to be told.

Even more damaging can be autistic characters who are poorly developed. TV and books repeat stereotypes, depicting autistics as geeky, muttering, rude, and introverted. Although those traits can sometimes be true, they need context. Writers could also create authentic autistic characters who are funny, wise, articulate, emotional, frustrated, and moody—all in the same day. Or in the same hour. Like real teens.

We should write more female characters with Aspergers. Boys are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders four times more often than girls. But many researchers believe that the ratio is closer to even, and speculate that girls may just be better at masking the symptoms. For girls who are yet to be diagnosed, reading books with autistic female characters might allow them to see themselves--and that they’re not alone.

Generation Z deserves to see diverse characters in YA. My daughter came home once from middle school and told me that a classmate had called her weird. She wanted to know if I agreed. “Our whole family is weird,” I said. “There is good weird and bad weird. We’re the good kind.” The next day, she had an update from her classmate. According to him, “weird is always bad.”


That story makes me sad—for him. Allistic (non-autistic) teens need to read about diverse characters to 
build empathy. To understand that different-ness has value.

We ought to celebrate unconventional people. Consider Albert Einstein, Isaac Newton, and Jane Austen. If they were living now, they would likely have an Aspergers diagnosis. Yet in today’s schools, they would be at risk of being bullied. Imagine a world that had silenced its chance at the theory of relativity. The laws of motion. Fitzwilliam Darcy.

GenZ-ers deserve books that open them to unique ways of being and thinking. Maybe reading those stories would give them permission to be different, too.

Groups need to see how they can be agents for change. In Fade to Us, the autistic heroine is involved in a summer musical camp. An adult tells her that “theater kids think ‘weird’ is normal.” That was a quote from a real high school drama teacher. When I interviewed him, he assured me that many teens on the spectrum participated in his programs and that they were welcomed because “actors are used to being different. We’re all odd here.”

Yes! Could organizations develop a kind of corporate empathy? Whether schools, clubs, sports teams, or faith communities, groups could be leading the way to more inclusiveness. If neurodiversity in YA fiction would shine a light on the issue, groups might recognize why they ought to seek and model change.

The teen fiction market is making progress with diversity, yet we can do more. Thirteen percent of public school students are identified with disabilities. One in 68 children have an autism spectrum diagnosis. They deserve to find characters like themselves in books. All teens need to read about people who are different from them. Let’s push toward greater inclusiveness in teen fiction. Let’s expect YA literature to reflect who we want to be. 

 
 
 
 

Fade To Us

By: Julia Day

Release Date: February 6, 2018

*GIVEAWAY DETAILS* 

 

Five winners will receive a copy of Fade To Us  (US only).  

 
 
 *Click the Rafflecopter link below to enter the giveaway*
a Rafflecopter giveaway
Featured Review: Turtles All the Way Down by John ...
Giveaway - PEEP AND EGG: I'M NOT USING THE POTTY (...

Related Posts

 

Comments 9

Already Registered? Login Here
Precious J Hernandez on Tuesday, 13 February 2018 07:40

I’ve recently read a book with a main character who’s on the spectrum, it made me so happy knowing they approached it in such a respectful way and the character was one of the joys of the book. Makes me happy knowing there’s more and more books out there with diverse characters. I’m definitely interested in this. Loving the cover too.

0
I’ve recently read a book with a main character who’s on the spectrum, it made me so happy knowing they approached it in such a respectful way and the character was one of the joys of the book. Makes me happy knowing there’s more and more books out there with diverse characters. I’m definitely interested in this. Loving the cover too.
Marisa Fort on Thursday, 15 February 2018 02:02

The cover is beautiful, love the colors. The book sounds interesting, can't wait to read!

0
The cover is beautiful, love the colors. The book sounds interesting, can't wait to read!
Hannah on Sunday, 25 February 2018 00:01

Gorgeous cover and I love that it includes a character on the spectrum

0
Gorgeous cover and I love that it includes a character on the spectrum
Kelly G on Friday, 02 March 2018 15:34

This cover is beautiful. I love the idea of the story - my daughter is autistic so I'm always looking for stories that offer a positive portrayal of those on the spectrum.

0
This cover is beautiful. I love the idea of the story - my daughter is autistic so I'm always looking for stories that offer a positive portrayal of those on the spectrum.
Candice Gigous on Saturday, 03 March 2018 07:53

The cover is romantic with lovely colors. The synopsis is very intriguing. Sounds like an interesting read.

0
The cover is romantic with lovely colors. The synopsis is very intriguing. Sounds like an interesting read.
Dan Denman on Wednesday, 07 March 2018 12:17

The book cover is colorful and fun. The synopsis sounds like a good sibling story.

0
The book cover is colorful and fun. The synopsis sounds like a good sibling story.
Danielle Hammelef on Thursday, 08 March 2018 10:07

I love the romantic cover. The synopsis tells me this is an important book with diverse characters.

0
I love the romantic cover. The synopsis tells me this is an important book with diverse characters.
Emily on Thursday, 08 March 2018 12:11

The cover is pretty but the synopsis is amazing m. I can’t wait to read it!

0
The cover is pretty but the synopsis is amazing m. I can’t wait to read it!
Penny Olson on Thursday, 08 March 2018 23:18

The cover is really bright and fun. I like stories about the theatre.

0
The cover is really bright and fun. I like stories about the theatre.

FEATURED GIVEAWAYS

Latest Book Listings Added

Be a Voter!: 450 Stickers for Democracy
 
4.5
 
0.0 (0)
Get out the vote! It’s...
I Believe In You
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
A charming picture book that inspires confidence, boosts self-esteem, and...
The Glass Queen (The Forest of Good and Evil, #2)
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
Once Upon a Time meets Game of Thrones in book...
Meanwhile
 
3.7
 
0.0 (0)
Celebrate 10 years of this completely original graphic novel take...
Grant Beagan: The Finder's Code
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
He’s just an ordinary teenager who likes astronomy, video games,...
Fisher- Price Fun in the Jungle: Explore, Touch, and Feel
 
4.5
 
0.0 (0)
Children will love exploring the different textures in this playful...
Glitter Globes: The Night Before Christmas
 
4.5
 
0.0 (0)
On the night before Christmas, all over the house, not...
Belinda Fellgate: HellCat
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
A contemporary teen fantasy about an inept 14-year-old girl who...
Breathless
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
From Jennifer Niven, the #1 New York Times bestselling author...
Music for Tigers
 
3.7
 
0.0 (0)
Shipped halfway around the world to spend the summer...
Skyhunter (Skyhunter, #1)
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
A broken world. An overwhelming evil. ...
Kingdom of Ice and Bone (The Frozen Sun Saga, #2)
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
Lira and Reyker have lost everything. Including each other....
Sword of the Seven Sins
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
Eva Marteinn never wanted to be a killer. Raised...
Things That Should Stay Buried
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
Some destinies are written in the stars. Others must...
How It All Blew Up
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda goes to Italy...
Horrid
 
4.3
 
0.0 (0)
From the author of You Must Not Miss comes...

Latest Member Reviews

Be a Voter!: 450 Stickers for Democracy
 
4.5
"BE A VOTER! is a delightful collection of stickers that encompass the power of voting, the democracy, and the reasons..."
I Believe In You
 
5.0
"I BELIEVE IN YOU is a delightfully encouraging book with bright colors and a charming story. While the main text..."
The Oracle Code
 
4.0
"THE ORACLE CODE visits Barbara Gordon (aka Batgirl and Oracle) in her teens after an accident that paralyzes part of..."
The Glass Queen (The Forest of Good and Evil, #2)
 
5.0
"THE GLASS QUEEN is an intense and fantastically written fairytale retelling of Cinderella. In the kingdom of Enchantia, fairytales are..."
The Kingdom of Back
 
5.0
"Marie Lu’s The Kingdom of Back is an historical fantasy based on real-life talents, Wolfgang Amedeus Motzart and his sister,..."
Meanwhile
 
3.7
"'Meanwhile' by Jason Shiga is a graphic novel adventure that will remind readers of the types of books in which..."
Fisher- Price Fun in the Jungle: Explore, Touch, and Feel
 
4.5
"FUN IN THE JUNGLE is an adorable board book great for infants and young toddlers who are exploring the world..."
Glitter Globes: The Night Before Christmas
 
4.5
"THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS modifies the original poem to be more modern and easily understood by young children. The classic..."
Twisting Minds
 
4.8
"The story: At seventeen, Claire Harper’s life has taken a turn for the worse – her mother..."
Breathless
 
4.0
"BREATHLESS is a book about change, secrets, and the aftermath. Claudine (Claude) is about to graduate high school, and she..."
Fae's Prisoner (Crimes of the Fae)
 
5.0
"This is the book I didn’t know I needed! Fae’s Prisoner by M. Lynn & Melissa A. Craven is the..."
Skyhunter (Skyhunter, #1)
 
5.0
"SKYHUNTER is an enthralling and lush YA fantasy. Lu really paints the story with her words, and this new novel..."
The Library of Lost Things
 
5.0
"I wasn't sure what to expect with The Library of Lost Things, but I know I didn't anticipate a book..."
Fae's Prisoner (Crimes of the Fae)
 
5.0
"After reading Queens of the Fae, I had such mixed feelings about Griffin... but now I love him! This book..."
Goddess in the Machine (Goddess in the Machine, #1)
 
5.0
"Andra, a teenager from the 2160s, is put into cryogenic stasis fulling expecting to wake up on another planet one..."
Just Shelby
 
N/A
"ARCs available for review @XpressoBookTours: http://xpressobooktours.com/2020/09/10/review-opportunity-just-shelby-by-brooklyn-james/?fbclid=IwAR2v9c-b9Z0YagynLTaMCNt-c-WW6nmWYZbuVBZYFoGNADs5c-DD6YayMGU"
Kingdom of Ice and Bone (The Frozen Sun Saga, #2)
 
4.0
"KINGDOM OF ICE AND BONE picks up where the first book left off. Lira and Reyker are separated and each..."
How It All Blew Up
 
5.0
"HOW IT ALL BLEW UP is an absolutely riveting coming-out story. Amir Azadi is an Iranian American who has always..."
Music for Tigers
 
3.7
"A vividly descriptive Middle-Grade work with an ecological focus--enriched by elements of music, friendship, and atypical neurology. When her..."
The Magic Misfits: The Fourth Suit (The Magic Misfits, #4)
 
5.0
"THE FOURTH SUIT is a fantastically magical finale. Ridley begins with a inventor's fair which she is entering with the..."