Spotlight on A Blind Guide to Stinkville, Plus Excerpt & Giveaway!

Spotlight on A Blind Guide to Stinkville, Plus Excerpt & Giveaway!

Today we're spotlighting Beth Vrabel's novel, A Blind Guide to Stinkville! Read on for more about Beth, this novel, the soon-to-be-sequel, a chapter excerpt, plus a giveaway!

Meet Beth Vrabel!

  1. Beth Vrabel grew up in a small town in Pennsylvania. She won a short­story contest in fourth grade and promptly decided writing was what she was going to do with her life. Although her other plans­­becoming a wolf biologist, a Yellowstone National Park ranger, and a professional roller skater­­didn't come to fruition, she stuck with the writing. After graduating from Pennsylvania State University with a degree in journalism, she moved through the ranks of a local newspaper to become editor of two regional magazines and a lifestyle columnist. Beth now lives in Connecticut with her wonderful husband, two charming children, a spoiled rotten puppy, and two guinea pigs, Winn­Dixie and Pippin.

     

 

Meet A Blind Guide to Stinkville!

  1. Before Stinkville, Alice didn’t think albinism—or the blindness that goes with it—was a big deal. Sure, she uses a magnifier to read books. And a cane keeps her from bruising her hips on tables. Putting on sunscreen and always wearing a hat are just part of life. But life has always been like this for Alice. Until Stinkville.

    For the first time in her life, Alice feels different—like she’s at a disadvantage. Back in her old neighborhood in Seattle, everyone knew Alice, and Alice knew her way around. In Stinkville, Alice finds herself floundering—she can’t even get to the library on her own. But when her parents start looking into schools for the blind, Alice takes a stand. She’s going to show them—and herself—that blindness is just a part of who she is, not all that she can be. To prove it, Alice enters the Stinkville Success Stories essay contest. No one, not even her new friend Kerica, believes she can scout out her new town’s stories and write the essay by herself. The funny thing is, as Alice confronts her own blindness, everyone else seems to see her for the first time.

This is a stirring small­town story that explores many different issues—albinism, blindness, depression, dyslexia, growing old, and more—with a light touch and lots of heart. Beth Vrabel’s characters are complicated and messy, but they come together in a story about the strength of community and friendship. This paperback edition includes a Q&A with the author and a sneak peek at the upcoming The Blind Guide to Normal

 

 

Meet A Blind Guide to Normal!

Richie “Ryder” Raymond has a gift. He can find the punchline in any situation, even in his limited vision and prosthetic eye. During the past year at Addison School for the Blind, Ryder’s quick wit earned the respect and friendship of his classmates. Heading to mainstream, or “normal,” school for eighth grade is going to be awesome.

After all, what’s not to like? At Addison, Ryder was everyone’s favorite person. He could make anyone laugh, especially his best friend Alice. So long as he can be first to make all of the one-eyed jokes, Ryder is sure he’ll fit in just as quick at Papuaville Middle School, home of the Fighting Guinea Pigs. But Alice warns him fitting in might not be as easy as he thinks.

Turns out, Alice was right. In just the first hour of “normal” school, Ryder is attacked by General MacCathur II (aka, Gramps’s cat), causes his bio teacher to pass out cold, makes an enemy out town hero Max, and falls for Jocelyn, the fierce girl next door who happens to be Max’s girlfriend. On top of that, Ryder struggles to hold onto his dignity in the face of students’ pity and Gramps’s non-stop practical jokes.

Ryder quickly sees the only thing worse than explaining a joke is being the punchline. But with help from his stuck-in-the-70s Gramps and encouragement from Alice, Ryder finds the strength to not only fight back, but to make peace.

This exciting sequel to A Blind Guide to Stinkville weaves humor, recovery and second chances into an unforgettable story, with characters who will hook you from page one.

 

 

A Blind Guide to Stinkville — Chapter 1

Even I could see that Tooter was no Seeing Eye dog.

The ancient Shih Tzu was about the size of a loaf of bread. His bottom teeth poked out of his mouth all the time. His eyes were once brown but now they were sort of gray. Tooter’s favorite thing in the world to do was to rub his butt against the ground. Or the table. Or someone’s leg. And to fart. And that’s the story behind the name Tooter.

After Mom finally agreed that my brother, James, could walk me to the library instead of making me spend another summer day alone at home (I mean, I guess, technically, it’s home, even though it doesn’t feel like it yet), he grabbed Tooter’s leash from a hook by the door.

“Come on, Alice. Might as well take care of two needy pains­in­the­butt,” he muttered. We moved to Sinkville, South Carolina, about three months ago. Sinkville is the official name, but everyone calls it Stinkville.

Home, I mean real home, is Seattle, Washington. We lived there, right along the shore, all twelve years of my life. There was always a wonderful blanket of soft gray in the sky, so I only had to put on sunscreen once in the morning and my milk­white skin stayed perfectly pale. The air smelled salty and like rain. Mom would walk me to school during the school year, and I’d spend the summer hanging out with my best friend, Eliza, who lived a block from us. Her mom let her walk over to our house by herself in the morning, but of course it was impossible for me to head out on my own. So we’d always hang out at my home. Mom would bake us cookies and tell us stories about her life B.A. (before Alice), when she was a travel writer. She made every day feel like an adventure. Sometimes when Dad came home from work, he’d say, “Where’d ya go today, Alice?” And I’d say anything from Argentina to Zaire, wherever Mom had talked about that day.

Here in Stinkville, life is pretty much the opposite of before. We live in a little house in the middle of the woods. Even with all the trees, the sky is blazing blue. I have to put on sunscreen every other hour. For real. And the air in Stinkville? It smells like rotting eggs. That’s because the whole town is centered on M. H. Bartel Paper Mill, where almost everyone (including the new plant manager, a.k.a. my dad) in town works.

Do you know how paper is made? I don’t either. But I do know it involves purposefully rotting wood. Rotting wood emits incredibly horrible smells. The scariest part: no one in town even smells it anymore. For real. So if we live in Stinkville long enough we’ll get used to the stink and we won’t even know how horrible it is to new people!

And if that wasn’t stinktastic enough, Mom doesn’t walk me to school or anywhere for that matter. Mostly that’s because we moved in the summer, so there is no school. But also because the longer we live here, the less Mom does anything Momish. She took me to the library the first week we were here but has been “too tired,” “feeling a little overwhelmed,” or “grrrmmlll” (the approximate sound she makes when I nudge her awake), since. She doesn’t even tell me to brush my teeth anymore, let alone explain what happened when she went diamond mining in Tanzania years ago.

But what about hanging out all day with my BFF? Well, she’s literally across the country. And I’m here. With no friends. No life. My only excitement now is going to M. H. Bartel Public Library (yup, even the library was named after the paper mill).

When James, Tooter, and I got to the library doors, I stomped and refused to go inside without my brother.

“What is your deal?” he hissed. “I said I’d take you to the library, not hold your books for you.”

“I can’t go by myself.” I stomped again. “Why not?”
I glared at him.

“Are you playing the blind card?” he sighed.
“I’m not playing,” I snapped. “I’m actually blind. And you have to help me.”
“I don’t have to do anything,” James snapped back. But he looked around for someplace to

tie Tooter’s leash.
“Do you think it’s okay to leave him out here?” I muttered. I mean, it was about a thousand

degrees out. Under my enormo sunhat, my sweaty hair felt wet, as if I had just left the shower. Tooter’s little pink tongue hung out of his mouth and almost touched the sidewalk.

“Urgh!” James jerked open the door to the library and stepped in, dragging Tooter along by the leash.

The cool fresh air hit my face as we walked inside and I breathed as deeply as I could. My glasses turn to sunglass lenses when I’m outside, so for a minute I was even more blind than usual while the lenses adjusted.

“Excuse me!” a high­pitched voice that seemed to come out of the speaker’s nose rather than her mouth called out. “We do not allow animals in here. This. Is. A. Library!”
As my lenses transitioned, I could make out a huge desk in front of us. Behind it, I saw a bright red blur that I think was the speaker’s shirt and a fluffy mound of yellow, which had to be her hair.

“I’m sorry,” James said. “It’s just, I’m bringing my sister here. I had to actually bring her in because she’s blind . . .”

“Oh!” The librarian sucked in her breath. I went ahead and rolled my eyes, figuring the person behind the desk was a) Not looking at me, and b) Not able to see behind my dark lenses anyway.

Where we used to live, everyone knew I was blind. It wasn’t a big deal. It was accepted, the same way everyone accepted that Josh’s mom always was last to pick him up from playdates and that Eliza’s hair was too curly to lie flat around her face.

But here, being blind is news. And this is the way it goes when people find out about me: they gasp. Then, if I’m close enough, I’ll see this awful expression on their faces, like they just ate some bad cheese but are holding it in their mouths instead of spitting it out. Then they become overly helpful, usually asking the person I’m with what they can do to help instead of asking me. They also speak super loudly, like maybe I’m also deaf. No one ever asks me questions.

If they did, I’d be able to explain.
So you’ve heard of 20/20 vision being normal? I’m 20/200 in my left eye, 20/210 in my right. So a “normal” person could read something from two hundred feet away that I’d have to be twenty feet from in order to read. I know, I know. You’re making the bad cheese face for me. Please stop. The point is: I can read. I just have to be really close.

Soon after making the gaspy voice, the librarian came out from behind the desk. My lenses were clearing up. She stood way too close to me, so I could make out that her lipstick was gloppy and pink, and that her yellow hair was gray at the roots. She smelled like lavender mixed with a little rotting eggs. I wonder if that was the paper mill stink on her.

“I am Mrs. Dexter,” the librarian said, slowly and loudly.
James snickered beside me, quickly turning it into a cough.
“I’m Alice,” I answered.
She stared hard at my eyes, which made me nervous. And that, in turn, made my eyes

move faster. So I guess I should just go ahead and say it. I’m blind because I have albinism. You know, like an albino. It just means my skin is about the color of paper, my hair is, too, and my eyes are blue. Everyone who has albinism is visually impaired. We have something called nystagmus, which makes our eyes always move back and forth. A lot of albinos aren’t blind like me, though; they are just visually impaired.

“Service animals are welcome in the M. H. Bartel Library, as are any individuals with special needs. Welcome, Alice.” Mrs. Dexter said all of this with long. Pauses. Between. Each. Word. “Welcome,” she said again.

James now openly grinned at me. He handed me Tooter’s leash. The dumb dog was scooting his butt along the carpet but seemed a little peppier in the air­conditioned building.

“Text me when you’re ready for me to pick you up,” James said. The traitor turned to leave.

“Wait!” Mrs. Dexter stole my line. “Does the Seeing Eye dog know where the large print section is or do I need to tell it?”

“Oh, he’ll figure it out,” James answered, and all three of us looked down at Tooter, who took the opportunity to sniff his own butt with one stubby leg in the air. “Just let Tooter dig right in.”

“Well, Tooter,” Mrs. Dexter patted Tooter’s head. “Let me know if you need anything.” “Where’s the children’s section?” I asked.
Mrs. Dexter seemed surprised that I spoke. “It’s to the left.” Tooter glanced up at her, so she

pointed in that direction. “But we don’t have Braille children’s books here . . .”
“Actually, I can read,” I said, walking purposefully to the left. “I just need to get closer.” And I think it all would’ve made a good impression on Bad Cheese Face Librarian had I not tripped.

­­­

Ah! The children’s section. I stopped at the entranceway and breathed in the smell of books and chaos. From the back of the vast room, I heard giggles and chattering as a preschool program let out. Beside me to the right, tables were set up. And all in front of me, rows and rows and rows of books. Someday I’m going to have a library in my own house. I think I could go ahead and skip the living room and just put in a reading room, with piles of books where the television should be.

Tooter pushed ahead of me and jumped onto a chair that was shaped like an open hand. I scooped him up and sat down in his place, holding him to my lap. The chair was pretty cool but it felt a little strange to be leaning back on a thumb. I reached out, grabbed a book at random, and opened it. I think I would’ve read the dictionary at that point; I was just so happy to be someplace comfortable. And, just so you know, I can read regular books. I just have to hold the book a couple inches from my face and hope there aren’t italics. Nystagmus makes a mess of italics. I use a magnifier to help me read, too. It’s small and sort of looks like a credit card, so I simply keep it in my back pocket.

“Um, you’re not actually allowed to bring pets in here.” I glanced over the cover of the book, which ended up being Because of Winn­Dixie, in the direction of the voice. “That’s the rule, even if you are reading a dog book.”

In front of me was a girl about my age, maybe eleven or twelve. Her arms were crossed and her voice was super quiet, maybe because we were in a library, but mostly she seemed like the type to always have a quiet voice.

She leaned forward to rub Tooter’s fluff­ball head. The girl’s dark brown skin made my own look even more paper white. Tooter tilted his head into her hand and let his tongue roll out of his open mouth. “Kate DiCamillo, the author of your book, writes that it’s hard not to fall in love with a dog with a great sense of humor,” she said with a slight laugh.

“He’s my Seeing Eye dog,” I said.
The girl laughed. “Sure he is.”
I smiled back. “The lady up front fell for it. So now Tooter is here . . .”

“Mrs. Dexter isn’t all there, you know what I mean?” The girl twirled her finger next to her ear and then sat in the other hand chair next to mine. “I’m Kerica, by the way. My mom’s the children’s librarian. She’s going to freak when she sees your dog in here. I want a dog so bad, but she keeps saying no.”

“I’m Alice. I just moved here a few weeks ago.”
“I figured,” Kerica said. “It’s a small town. Someone new sticks out.”
“They stand out even more if they’re an albino.”
Kerica snorted. Then she bit her lip and smashed her lips together so hard that I snorted,

too. “I’m sorry!” she gasped. “I didn’t mean to laugh. But it was just so—”
“Obvious?” I laughed. Soon we were both giggling.
In just a few minutes, I learned a lot of things. First, Kerica spends every summer day, all

day, in the library with her mom. She’s read about forty books already and it was only the end of June!

“Most of them are dog books,” she said, and shrugged in a sad sort of way, which I immediately got. Everyone knows dog stories are a downer. “When I’m tired of reading, I draw pictures of the characters.” She flipped open the notebook she was holding and held it up for just a second. I pretended I could see the drawing.

Second, Kerica asks direct questions but they don’t feel rude. Like when she asked me if everyone in my family has albinism (nope, just me) and then said, “That must feel a little lonely.” That could’ve made me feel sad, but it didn’t. It made me feel like she understood.

“Is that a dog in my library?” a booming voice called out.

Kerica kept on rubbing Tooter’s head, who had abandoned my lap for hers the second Kerica had sat down. “Simmer down, Ma. It’s a Seeing Eye dog.”

Kerica’s mom stood in front of me, her arms crossed. She looked so much like a bigger, softer version of Kerica that I had to smile. She watched the two of us for a long moment. “Does Mrs. Dexter know about this animal in here?”

I nodded. “If it helps, I really am blind.”
“She’s got albinism, Ma.”
“‘S’at right?” She muttered in the slow southern twang I was still getting used to hearing.

She seemed a little caught off guard, but didn’t have the bad cheese face.
It’s kind of funny. When I lived in Seattle, everyone I knew had always known me. Like Eliza and I had been in the same playgroup when we were babies. Our neighbors had never moved. My elementary school teachers had all taught James before me. Everyone knew everything about me without my ever having to tell them. So I had never had to explain albinism, blindness,

or nystagmus to anyone before. They already knew.
But here I was in this library for less than an hour, and I already had to tell three people I

was blind. This third time it just sort of slipped out.
“Ma, this is Alice. She’s new to town,” Kerica said.
“Welcome, Alice. I’m Mrs. Morris. Make sure your dog doesn’t do­do in the library.” Mrs.

Morris started to walk away, then turned back suddenly and rubbed Tooter’s head. This was seriously the dog’s best day ever.

Honestly, it was my best day ever in Stinkville, too. 

Read reviews of A Blind Guide to Stinkville HERE!

 

A Blind Guide to Stinkville

By: Beth Vrabel

Paperback Release Date: August 9, 2016 

*GIVEAWAY DETAILS* 

Five winners will receive A Blind Guide to Stinkville (US & Canada only).

*Click the Rafflecopter link below to enter the giveaway*

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Comments 4

Already Registered? Login Here
Dianna G. on Saturday, 06 August 2016 00:16

I've never read a book about albinism. Sounds interesting!

0
I've never read a book about albinism. Sounds interesting!
Linda Romer on Thursday, 11 August 2016 21:00

A Blind Guide to stinkville sounds like a touching read ♡ Thank you

0
A Blind Guide to stinkville sounds like a touching read ♡ Thank you
Danielle Hammelef on Saturday, 27 August 2016 17:11

thanks for the excerpt--I love the characters already and am going to read this author's books. She has a powerful writing voice. the covers--excellent for the synopses.

0
thanks for the excerpt--I love the characters already and am going to read this author's books. She has a powerful writing voice. the covers--excellent for the synopses.
Nicole Wetherington on Sunday, 04 September 2016 23:56

Great post!

0
Great post!

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