Books Young Adult Fiction The Picture of Dorian Gray

The Picture of Dorian Gray

 
0.0
 
3.0 (2)
1070   0
Author(s)
Publisher
Genre(s)
Age Range
12+
ISBN
0812567110
Buy This Book
      

User reviews

Average user rating from: 2 user(s)

Already have an account? or Create an account
Overall rating 
 
3.0
Plot 
 
3.0  (2)
Characters 
 
0.0  (0)
Writing Style 
 
0.0  (0)
Reader reviewed by Sahar Jarad

1.  Intended Audience:



  • Middle and High School students.  The novel is an easy-read and although it contains dense concepts, such as homosexuality and the aestheticism movement, its audience is intended for secondary and pre-secondary students.


2.  Summary:



  • The novel revolves around the egocentric, young, and beautiful man named Dorian Gray.  He crosses trails with the painter, Basil Hallward who becomes completely awestruck by Dorians physical attractiveness, and begins to paint Dorians portrait and labeling it as a new form of art.  Dorian meets Basils wise friend, Lord Henry Wotton, and they begin discussing youth and beauty and its temporary course in nature.  Dorian becomes completely distressed at the thought of aging and decaying, so he sells his soul to maintain his physical beauty forever, while his portrait will endure natures course.  However, things start to decline for Dorian as he falls into a series of wicked and immoral acts.  Essentially, these acts are kept in secrecy; however, they are dreadfully portrayed on his portrait for all to see.


3.  Teachability:



  • I may teach this novel using the various lenses: homoerotic, aesthetic and realistic.  Because of the time and place this novel was published, the subject of homosexuality was never directly discussed, so this novel subliminally discusses homoerotic issues.  This would be a great opportunity to discuss sexuality by raising the following guiding questions:


    1. Compare and contrast the male characters relationships with each other.  Basil and Dorian?  Dorian and Lord Henry? Lord Henry and Basil?

    2. How does Wilde express the homosexual tension that seems to take place between the male characters?  Why does Wilde never address this issue directly in the novel?

    3. How has homosexual issues impacted literature from Wildes time period to more recent periods?

  • These questions will raise awareness about homosexuality and its impact over the history of literature.  Students will be able to recognize homosexual references in texts and connect such references to the novels plot.

  • Wilde compares books to art and says that books do not speak to morality; yet, the novel insinuates that art expresses not only beauty but morality as well.  Every time Dorian committed a sin, his portrait showed it as it morphed into a vile reflection of his inner-self.  Some guiding questions that will address this idea of artistic expression is:


    1. What is the point of books?  What are their purposes?

    2. It seems that all books have a main goal.  Is there such a thing as a book existing without some sort of moral address or instructional purpose?


4.  Relationship to the Curriculum:



  • This text fits into the traditional curriculum because it speaks to the Victorian time Period in which the concept of sensibility and sympathy toward the protagonist is highly regarded.  Victorians, such as Charles Dickens, Robert Browning, and George Elliot, believed that art was a way of expressing morality and social education.

  • The aestheticism movement aimed to break free from the Victorian conception of art and morality.  This movement was held by the belief that art has no other purpose than to just exist for its mere charm and beauty.

  • This novel is considered a gothic novel.  This genre may be used to connect to the curriculum.  As a teacher, I would recommend other texts that speak to this gothic genre such as the texts by Edgar Allen Poe.  This exposure to genre will help students see a very different kind of writing.  Gothic texts often require the readers to read with kindred art meaning that readers must engage with the texts in order to actually understand it the way the author intended.  For example, Wildes homoerotic references were subliminally suggested in the text and it was essentially up to the readers to catch this.


5.  Controversy:



  • This text may be controversial because of the reference to homosexuality.  I do not see anything wrong with addressing homosexuality in a classroom.  It is a topic that is too often ignored.  Teachers must be aware that there own students may either be a homosexual or oppose it completely.  So teachers must address this issue in a thoughtful, unprejudiced, and neutral manner.  Some ways are as basic as assigning a novel that speaks to homosexuality.


6.  Review:



  • When Basil, an exquisite artist, paints a portrait of the stunningly attractive and young Dorian Gray, Dorian becomes even more obsessed with his beauty and youth.  Selling his soul and innocence, Dorian becomes a victim of his own crimes when he leads a life full of crime, murder, and sins.  The Picture of Dorian Gray speaks to the importance of morals.  It portrays the superficial nature of how society prioritizes beauty, and readers are able to look at Dorian and question the distinction between ethics and physical beauty.  The novel speaks to the pressures of influence and of its negative consequences.  Dorian is influenced by the desire to be beautiful no matter what the cost.  This emphasis on individualism leads into a self-sacrifice into Dorians own destruction.
Overall rating 
 
1.0
Plot 
 
1.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
a reader Reviewed by a reader April 05, 2009
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (20052)

YA Book Review

Reader reviewed by Sahar Jarad

1.  Intended Audience:



  • Middle and High School students.  The novel is an easy-read and although it contains dense concepts, such as homosexuality and the aestheticism movement, its audience is intended for secondary and pre-secondary students.


2.  Summary:



  • The novel revolves around the egocentric, young, and beautiful man named Dorian Gray.  He crosses trails with the painter, Basil Hallward who becomes completely awestruck by Dorians physical attractiveness, and begins to paint Dorians portrait and labeling it as a new form of art.  Dorian meets Basils wise friend, Lord Henry Wotton, and they begin discussing youth and beauty and its temporary course in nature.  Dorian becomes completely distressed at the thought of aging and decaying, so he sells his soul to maintain his physical beauty forever, while his portrait will endure natures course.  However, things start to decline for Dorian as he falls into a series of wicked and immoral acts.  Essentially, these acts are kept in secrecy; however, they are dreadfully portrayed on his portrait for all to see.


3.  Teachability:



  • I may teach this novel using the various lenses: homoerotic, aesthetic and realistic.  Because of the time and place this novel was published, the subject of homosexuality was never directly discussed, so this novel subliminally discusses homoerotic issues.  This would be a great opportunity to discuss sexuality by raising the following guiding questions:


    1. Compare and contrast the male characters relationships with each other.  Basil and Dorian?  Dorian and Lord Henry? Lord Henry and Basil?

    2. How does Wilde express the homosexual tension that seems to take place between the male characters?  Why does Wilde never address this issue directly in the novel?

    3. How has homosexual issues impacted literature from Wildes time period to more recent periods?

  • These questions will raise awareness about homosexuality and its impact over the history of literature.  Students will be able to recognize homosexual references in texts and connect such references to the novels plot.

  • Wilde compares books to art and says that books do not speak to morality; yet, the novel insinuates that art expresses not only beauty but morality as well.  Every time Dorian committed a sin, his portrait showed it as it morphed into a vile reflection of his inner-self.  Some guiding questions that will address this idea of artistic expression is:


    1. What is the point of books?  What are their purposes?

    2. It seems that all books have a main goal.  Is there such a thing as a book existing without some sort of moral address or instructional purpose?


4.  Relationship to the Curriculum:



  • This text fits into the traditional curriculum because it speaks to the Victorian time Period in which the concept of sensibility and sympathy toward the protagonist is highly regarded.  Victorians, such as Charles Dickens, Robert Browning, and George Elliot, believed that art was a way of expressing morality and social education.

  • The aestheticism movement aimed to break free from the Victorian conception of art and morality.  This movement was held by the belief that art has no other purpose than to just exist for its mere charm and beauty.

  • This novel is considered a gothic novel.  This genre may be used to connect to the curriculum.  As a teacher, I would recommend other texts that speak to this gothic genre such as the texts by Edgar Allen Poe.  This exposure to genre will help students see a very different kind of writing.  Gothic texts often require the readers to read with kindred art meaning that readers must engage with the texts in order to actually understand it the way the author intended.  For example, Wildes homoerotic references were subliminally suggested in the text and it was essentially up to the readers to catch this.


5.  Controversy:



  • This text may be controversial because of the reference to homosexuality.  I do not see anything wrong with addressing homosexuality in a classroom.  It is a topic that is too often ignored.  Teachers must be aware that there own students may either be a homosexual or oppose it completely.  So teachers must address this issue in a thoughtful, unprejudiced, and neutral manner.  Some ways are as basic as assigning a novel that speaks to homosexuality.


6.  Review:



  • When Basil, an exquisite artist, paints a portrait of the stunningly attractive and young Dorian Gray, Dorian becomes even more obsessed with his beauty and youth.  Selling his soul and innocence, Dorian becomes a victim of his own crimes when he leads a life full of crime, murder, and sins.  The Picture of Dorian Gray speaks to the importance of morals.  It portrays the superficial nature of how society prioritizes beauty, and readers are able to look at Dorian and question the distinction between ethics and physical beauty.  The novel speaks to the pressures of influence and of its negative consequences.  Dorian is influenced by the desire to be beautiful no matter what the cost.  This emphasis on individualism leads into a self-sacrifice into Dorians own destruction.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Reader reviewed by Veronika

I read it first at school (we had to pick a book to sum up it) and I adored it !
It's a classic, and very easy to read. I like Wilde's style. You're taken to this period, with ladies, dandies...

The "magical" side pleased me, too.

PS: I read this book after watching "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen". The Dorian in the movie doesn't correspond at all with the one of the book !
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
0.0
Writing Style 
 
0.0
a reader Reviewed by a reader May 21, 2006
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (20052)

Everlasting Dorian, everlasting book

Reader reviewed by Veronika

I read it first at school (we had to pick a book to sum up it) and I adored it !
It's a classic, and very easy to read. I like Wilde's style. You're taken to this period, with ladies, dandies...

The "magical" side pleased me, too.

PS: I read this book after watching "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen". The Dorian in the movie doesn't correspond at all with the one of the book !

Was this review helpful to you? 
 
Powered by JReviews

LATEST YABC BLOG POSTS - BLOG TOURS, ANNOUNCEMENTS, AND GIVEAWAYS

View more blog entries

Latest Book Listings Added

Category: Kids Fiction
Zane is not that interested in the Gollywhopper Games. He'd rather play football and is sure that he's headed straight...
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
Chock-full of puzzles, riddles, and challenges for the reader to solve along with the main characters, this fast-paced companion to...
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
On his twelfth birthday, Archie Greene receives a mysterious package containing an ancient book in a language he doesn't recognize....
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
The life of Australian teen Gerald Wilkins changed forever when he inherited twenty billion pounds and a mystery to solve....
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
It's only been a month since Gerald Wilkins became the richest kid on earth and uncovered a plot of murder...
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
Gerald Wilkins never considered himself a particularly exceptional thirteen-year-old. But that was before he inherited twenty billion pounds, a Caribbean...
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
Brendan Buckley is headed to middle school on a whole new adventure. When his alternative energy idea gets him paired...
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
When Bobbie's hilariously bumbling efforts to save her brother's Christmas actually land him on Santa's Naughty List, she must travel...
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
Rory Rooney likes to be prepared for anything. That sort of planning pays off when you’re the smallest kid in...
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
Kid genius Kevin Brewer and his friends must defend Earth from an invasion of vengeful aliens in the second installment...
 
4.5
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
Aliens Attack! When science camp buddies Kevin, Warner, Tara, and TJ summon alien life to earth, they quickly find out...
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
It is 1895. Stan is on a mission to find his long-lost father in the logging camps of Michigan. And...
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
Jimmy Bishop loves doing 3 things: 1) Laughing at funny dog videos online, 2) watching his favorite show (Stop! Police!)...
 
5.0
 
0.0 (0)
Keep calm and make it to prom night—without a legit panic attack. For seventeen-year-old Bree Hughes, it’s easier said than...
 
0.0
 
0.0 (0)
Avatar meets The Terminator in this thrilling cyber-tech adventure. Crippled by muscular dystrophy, Adam spends his...
 
3.7
 
0.0 (0)
Narrated by an alternating unreliable group of teens, this dark thriller will have readers on the...
 
3.7
 
0.0 (0)
When Carolyn Lessing moves from New Jersey to Alabama with her mother, she rattles the status...
 
4.0
 
0.0 (0)
Printz Honor author Carolyn Mackler returns with this striking new novel that chronicles the lives of five teenagers through the...
 
3.3
 
0.0 (0)
Category: Kids Fiction
For fans of Raina Telgemeier’s Smile, a heartwarming graphic novel about friendship and surviving junior high through the power of...
 
4.5
 
0.0 (0)
In a pursuit that has spanned continents, Iolanthe, Titus, and their friends have always managed to remain one step ahead...
 
4.3
 
0.0 (0)