They Both Die at the End

They Both Die at the End

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They Both Die at the End
Author(s)
Publisher
Age Range
14+
Release Date
September 05, 2017
ISBN
978-0062457790
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New York Times bestselling author Adam Silvera reminds us that there’s no life without death and no love without loss in this devastating yet uplifting story about two people whose lives change over the course of one unforgettable day. On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They’re going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they’re both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There’s an app for that. It’s called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure—to live a lifetime in a single day. In the tradition of Before I Fall and If I Stay, They Both Die at the End is a tour de force from acclaimed author Adam Silvera, whose debut, More Happy Than Not, the New York Times called “profound.”

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1 reviews

Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
5.0  (1)
Characters 
 
5.0  (1)
Writing Style 
 
4.0  (1)
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0

A Beautiful Book

The date is September 5, 2017 and Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio are both going to die. Thanks to an app called Last Friend, they find each other and commit to spend their day in the best way possible—whatever that means.

THEY BOTH DIE AT THE END should be an incredibly sad book about dying, but instead it’s a manual on how to live. Author Adam Silvera shows how we’re all part of a single tapestry, and intersections with others can have a significance you might never understand. Mateo and Rufus are both beautiful souls, and though they are each flawed, their imperfections help strengthen the other. The day that they spend together might seem unremarkable to someone who doesn’t know them; fortunately, we get to know them both really well through some great character development.

In the midst of Mateo and Rufus’s story are the stories of many others. We just catch glimpses of some of them, and others receive a bit longer look. It’s understandable that none of them are as well put together as the two protagonists, but there are instances where the glimpses seem a bit too contrived and they distract rather than sharpen the focus on the two I really wanted to see.

This book would be a wonderful addition to a high school classroom. The conversations and debates I imagine it generating among teens would be awesome. Adam Silvera has created a fascinating, modern coming-of-age story, and I look forward to sharing it with others so that I can talk about it.

My thanks to the publisher and YA Books Central for a copy of the book in exchange for my honest review.

Good Points
Two protagonists with beautiful souls

A conversation starter for young adults
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Overall rating 
 
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5.0  (2)
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5.0  (2)
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Overall rating 
 
5.0
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5.0
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5.0
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5.0

This book broke me.

Adam Silvera makes me cry. Holy crap. I hardly ever cry when reading, but I’ve cried twice this year and both books were by Adam. They Both Die At The End is pretty different from History Is All You Left Me, but it had the same effect on me. Maybe even more. I knew they were going to die when the book ended, but it didn’t matter. I cried.

It all started with the author note. It was beautifully written and shows what an amazing human being Adam Silvera is. He has a way with words that just makes you feel. And the characters start to feel like real people, people you actually know and care about.

I loved the diversity in this book. Another thing I enjoyed was the extra people. The short little chapters about different people Mateo and Rufus met or people who had some part in their day. It reminded me a bit of Nicola Yoon’s The Sun Is Also A Star. That is one of the things I love about her story telling, too. Deidre was one of the other characters and I really loved her idea on reincarnation. That you can find out when and where you’ll be reincarnated so that your loved ones can find you. These little stories really added to the book for me.

But the real story was Mateo and Rufus. The way they brought out the best in each other was so heartwarming. I knew things would end badly, but I kept hoping that they would live.

Good Points
Everything about this book. The writing, diversity, and character development was incredible.
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Overall rating 
 
5.0
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5.0
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5.0
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5.0

A life-affirming, heartbreaking novel

I think we all know what to expect from a book entitled They Both Die at the End; nevertheless, reading the actual novel was an anxious experience: my eyes were glued to every page, waiting for the ball to drop, for something terrifying to happen. You expect the book to be sad, to be heartbreaking and depressing. What you don’t expect is to smile, to laugh, and to fall in love – to feel such happiness, even amidst such pain. When a novel brings out these intense, warring emotions within you, that’s when you know you are reading an Adam Silvera novel.

They Both Die at the End, despite being a slightly morbid novel, is also an incredibly important one. The message the novel promotes is something that will relate to readers of all ages, but will undoubtedly stick with the young. It’s a book about living life to the fullest, which isn’t an especially unique sentiment – it’s rather something you would see on a cat poster or read in a self-help book – but Silvera’s distinctive twist on the adage is what makes his novel so powerful.

Imagine receiving a call at midnight telling you that you are going to die today. You are not told the specifics: you don’t know what time, how, or even who by – all you know is that today is your last day. Many of you will be angry and sad and hurt – and many more of us will feel guilty for a life unspent. We all have our insecurities and fears; Silvera’s novel tries to teach us to push past the fear and become the person we were always meant to be.

That being said, the novel doesn’t just tell you to go out there and put yourself in uncomfortable positions, it shows you through the power of friendship and family and making your own family, the ways in which we can live, not just survive.

Mateo is the character who is just trying to survive: he spends his days trapped in his apartment with his single father (who is currently in a coma), and only ventures out to see his best friend and her baby girl. Mateo is frightened of the outside world, although he’s not agoraphobic; more, he is afraid of putting himself out there for fear of being humiliated or rejected. It’s something we can all empathise with.

Rufus, on the other hand, is an angry boy, still reeling from the loss of his entire family months ago, and the recent breakup with his girlfriend. When we meet him, he is beating up his girlfriend’s new boyfriend when he gets the call. Unlike Mateo, Rufus is not scared: he wants to spend his Last Day with no fear, experiencing anything and everything he possibly can before he goes. I think we would all benefit from a Rufus in our lives.

Silvera’s writing, as always, is beautiful and haunting and makes you feel. Although I didn’t cry as much as I did when I read More Happy Than Not, They Both Die at the End will weigh on you for days. The plot is slow-paced, more concerned with character development, but the pieces gradually come together as the reader watches in horrid fascination, helpless to prevent what they know will come to fruition.

While reading They Both Die at the End, I had this lyric from Hamilton in my head: “Death doesn’t discriminate / Between the sinners / And the saints / It takes and it takes and it takes.” It’s an sorrowful statement, but it’s also remarkably true, and I think it’s also a statement that is at the heart of this novel: death takes and it’s unfair at times, but at the end of the day we can’t escape it, so must try to live instead.

Good Points
Check out my blog and other reviews: thebookcorps.wordpress.com
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