Ink (The Paper Gods #1)

Ink (The Paper Gods #1)

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Ink (The Paper Gods #1)
Author(s)
Age Range
14+
Release Date
June 25, 2013
ISBN
037321071X
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I looked down at the paper, still touching the tip of my shoe. I reached for it, flipping the page over to look.

Scrawls of ink outlined a drawing of girl lying on a bench.

A sick feeling started to twist in my stomach, like motion sickness.

And then the girl in the drawing turned her head, and her inky eyes glared straight into mine.

On the heels of a family tragedy, the last thing Katie Greene wants to do is move halfway across the world. Stuck with her aunt in Shizuoka, Japan, Katie feels lost. Alone. She doesn’t know the language, she can barely hold a pair of chopsticks, and she can’t seem to get the hang of taking her shoes off whenever she enters a building.

Then there’s gorgeous but aloof Tomohiro, star of the school’s kendo team. How did he really get the scar on his arm? Katie isn’t prepared for the answer. But when she sees the things he draws start moving, there’s no denying the truth: Tomo has a connection to the ancient gods of Japan, and being near Katie is causing his abilities to spiral out of control. If the wrong people notice, they'll both be targets.

Katie never wanted to move to Japan—now she may not make it out of the country alive.

Editor reviews

1 reviews

Overall rating 
 
3.7
Plot 
 
4.0  (1)
Characters 
 
3.0  (1)
Writing Style 
 
4.0  (1)
(Updated: June 25, 2013)
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
3.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0

A Novel for Fans of Manga and Kdrama!

What I Loved:
I really did not expect to like Ink. Obviously, I did when I requested the book (Japan! Fantasy! That cover!), but reviews started pouring in and almost all were negative and listed the sorts of reasons I generally agree with, like relationship dynamics and instalove. Here I am, though, having really liked Ink, almost loved it, in spite of all of that. While I can see why a lot of my trusted friends haven't enjoyed it, I had a ton of fun reading it and, minus some hiccups on the romance side of things, thought it was a strong novel besides.

To explain this disparity between my opinion and those of others, I have to explain just how much of a nerd I am. In 2008, while interning at a public library, I picked up a love for manga, which has since bloomed into a love for anime and kdrama. Even before that, Asian culture fascinated me, but now it's verging (if we lessen my crazy) on obsession. There are a lot of upsetting elements in the average kdrama/manhwa/anime/manga/jdrama. Men tend to be dominant; women weak and easy to tears. Boyfriends tend to be overly physical, verging on abusive, with their girlfriends. I see this, but, for some reason, it's not as much of an obstacle to my enjoyment as it is in American pop culture. Now, I'm not saying that the romance is necessarily like this in Ink, but I'm trying to explain that my standards are subtly different for the stories set in this other culture.

For those of you who are big fans of manga (which will be my shorthand for all those permutations listed above), Ink is delightful. Amanda Sun peppers the text with those classic scenes to be found in almost any shoujo manga: the wrist grab, the boy carrying the girl on his bike, the close stares that don't end in kisses but leave the heroine a blushing mess, the yakuza, the sakura. There were so many moments that made me laugh giddily because I recognized them from pop culture. Ink really does read like a manga, which is made of win.

The premise, too, is fascinating, and I really think Sun does a marvelous job with it. I was impressed with her writing in general, but her descriptions of the ink coming alive really do burst off the page. In fact, her love for Japan, for kendo, for art, and for Japanese history really do shine through. Her twist on the mythology of the kami, Japanese gods really worked, and seemed pretty sensitive to Japanese culture thus far; I am so glad Katie, a white girl from the US was not a kami. Also, the plot takes a Death Note sort of turn near the end, which is going to become more of a factor in later books I think, that makes me want to take a chip and eat it...while cackling malevolently.

Katie does stalk Tomohiro quite a bit in the beginning, but, even that, I'm okay with, for the most part. She's a bit of a creeper, but she does have reason to be curious: she saw his pictures moving and ink dripping seemingly from nowhere. Plus, she was really homesick and lonely, and the mystery of what was going on with Tomohiro was a good distraction. Getting caught up in that is what helps her transition from a foreigner to someone who really belongs. Once she gets more involved in life there, her Japanese improves much faster and so does her general quality of life.

About the romance, I really wouldn't categorize it as instalove personally. For one thing, Katie and Tomohiro really do spend a fair amount of time together, and time elapses between their initial meetings and their declarations of love. They do move too fast once they start the relationship, and do the whole inexplicably drawn to each other thing, though. However, I'm willing to mostly let that slide, since Katie and Tomo do actually have chemistry and are occasionally quite adorable together, like when Tomo blushes. I won't say I'm shipping them hard, but I don't hate them as a couple either.

What Left Me Wanting More:
The downside of their relationship was how serious their bond became. They do the whole "I'm ready to sacrifice myself for you" and "can't live without you" thing, which is really getting old. I really don't think most teens are this willing to die for love. Not only that, but the dialogue at these points always gets so hackneyed and melodramatic. Tomo definitely tries to do the manly keep Katie in the dark and protect her thing sometimes, but, what saved this book for me, Katie doesn't let him. Both Katie and Tomo know about the imperfections of the other, and they call each other on their bad habits. Katie calls Tomo out several times for not telling her things or for being a jerk, and Tomo does the same when Katie keeps stalking him. They're accepting one another's bad qualities, not unaware of them. Even if Tomo tries all that masculine nonsense, Katie doesn't let him. Though I don't approve of a lot of Katie's decisions, they are at least real choices, and not her being forced one way or another by other people in her life.

The Final Verdict:
Ink turned out to be a fantastic book, despite my expectations to the contrary. If book two were available now, I would not hesitate to read it right away. I highly recommend this one to fans of Japanese or Korean pop culture!

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User reviews

3 reviews

Overall rating 
 
3.5
Plot 
 
4.0  (3)
Characters 
 
3.0  (3)
Writing Style 
 
3.3  (3)
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Overall rating 
 
3.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
3.0
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For those who like myth and Japan

I went into this one thinking I was going to love it but I found it kinda flat. For me the romance was a bit flat and the story dragged a bit. The premise is really intriguing but I just think it could have been carried off at a faster pace. This book took me a month to read and that's a long time for me. The stuff about Japan was good though and I do feel like the author really captured Japan well. I felt like I was there. I'd consider picking up the next in the series to see if it picks up for me. I think this read was less about the book not being good and maybe more about it just not being a good fit for me. I tend to read thrillers so I got caught by the slower pacing in this one.

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Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0

For all anime fans

In an industry where almost all the top YA novels are set in US or somewhere like Europe (even those are rare), Ink is fresh and exotic with its Japanese setting. I honestly was intrigued because for the first time, I was reading a YA book set in Japan with the paranormal legends from Japan. Having read plenty of manga and light novels, I honestly can say the writing was in sync with the setting. It had a distinctive style and the even the cultural nuances were so on the mark – the behavior of the characters, how they speak to each other, and other details like the day-to-day things that Katie does. The realistic storytelling completely drew me in, and the darker tones to the story intrigued me.

Katie is such a strong girl; fearless and doesn’t back down from a challenge. Few would actually have the courage to go to an entirely foreign country where you don’t even know the language properly. Japanese is a tough language and reading it is particularly a challenge. Even conversations have these little rules, differences for a single statement based on who you were talking to. She braves it, though stumbling along the way, while fitting into a traditional school. Tomohiro, a loner, who is used to pushing people away for their safety, is quite complex and layered. He believes he is less than human, and the Kami within him is bursting to take over. Katie unbalances him, surprises him with her pushiness and borderline stalker-like tendencies. He does have his low moments (especially when he is trying to ‘protect’) – for which Katie calls him out on, overall he is a good guy. The dynamic between them is so cute – with the banter and snarkiness. Perhaps if you are not used to any Japanese works, it might seem a bit odd at times – with how much emphasis they put on names.

The mythology was interesting, with the Kami being spirits passed along a bloodline that can control ink and make it create and do their bidding. I am definitely hoping for more details, though – especially about the dreams Tomohiro had in Shadows, the prequel. Katie being present in his dreams seemed quite a crucial thing which never came up in Ink, so I was a bit disappointed when that wasn’t explained. Basically, a great read if you are into Japanese legends or are looking for something new in the paranormal genre.

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Overall rating 
 
3.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
2.0
Writing Style 
 
3.0

Ink by Amanda Sun

When I read Shadows by Sun, I just knew that I was going to love this. Unfortunately I did not. I thought I was going to learn so much about Japanese mythology but most of my questions went unanswered in the end.
What I most disliked about the book, was the first third of it. It was a bit confusing and the switching of Japanese and English and back and forth was weird for me. I felt like it needed a smoother transition. Then, the biggest drama filled thing that I remember from the first part of the book was what happened between Myu and Tomo, and after that I was a little disappointed.
What I did enjoy was the romance. We all know I love me some swoony scenes, and this one definitely has some. I loved the way that Tomo and Katie interacted together. Well once they gave in and stopped avoiding each other.
All in all, I'm not a huge fan of books that take a long time to get going, so I was a little disappointed when this one did. I wanted so bad to love it, but I just couldn't get into it. Then, as I reached the end, there were still some things I did not understand. I just couldn't get into it like I wanted.

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