Monument 14 Featured

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3.7 (2)
 
4.1 (3)
1118   0
Genre(s)
Age Range
14+
Release Date
June 05, 2012
ISBN
9780312569037
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In Emmy Laybourne’s action-packed debut novel, six high school kids (some popular, some not), two eighth graders (one a tech genius), and six little kids trapped together in a chain superstore build a refuge for themselves inside. While outside, a series of escalating disasters, beginning with a monster hailstorm and ending with a chemical weapons spill, seems to be tearing the world—as they know it—apart

Editor reviews

Average editor rating from: 2 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
3.7
Plot 
 
4.0  (2)
Characters 
 
3.0  (2)
Writing Style 
 
4.0  (2)

I started reading Monument 14 in the morning and finished it by the end of the day. It definitely hooked me from page one. The voice of Dean is honest and descriptive. Monument 14 takes place in the near future when a apocalyptic event has turned the country upside down leaving 14 children( teens, tweens, and elementary school children) stuck inside a superstore. The story moves fast since the entire novel is compressed into 12 days.

As a reader, I rooted for different characters at different times. I found the elementary students personalities entertaining and fresh as each age dealt with problems in unique ways. I wish I was given more time to feel emotional connections to each of the characters. Even though I wanted to know how each character dealt with being inside the superstore- I didn't feel a strong connection to any character in particular. Given the fast pace of the action in the book and the fact the plot only covers 12 days I can understand why the connections didn't happen. Although this came as a disappointment it did not distract from the story.  There are a few twists in the plot, some predictable others not as much. Without giving away too much, I enjoyed the different series of events that lead to the children being trapped inside a supper store.

I was happy to read that there will be a sequel coming out next year. This explains the cliffhanger ending - I finished the book thinking, "What happens? I  need to know more." and ran to research if there was a sequel. 

Readers who like apocalyptic novels and books such as Trapped by Michael Northtrop and the Last Survivors Trilogy by Susan Beth  Pfeffer will enjoy Monument 14. With lots of action and an extremely fast pace, this novel keeps moving and will keep readers turning pages
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
3.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Joanne, Editor Reviewed by Joanne, Editor July 22, 2012
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (93)

Monumental Read

I started reading Monument 14 in the morning and finished it by the end of the day. It definitely hooked me from page one. The voice of Dean is honest and descriptive. Monument 14 takes place in the near future when a apocalyptic event has turned the country upside down leaving 14 children( teens, tweens, and elementary school children) stuck inside a superstore. The story moves fast since the entire novel is compressed into 12 days.

As a reader, I rooted for different characters at different times. I found the elementary students personalities entertaining and fresh as each age dealt with problems in unique ways. I wish I was given more time to feel emotional connections to each of the characters. Even though I wanted to know how each character dealt with being inside the superstore- I didn't feel a strong connection to any character in particular. Given the fast pace of the action in the book and the fact the plot only covers 12 days I can understand why the connections didn't happen. Although this came as a disappointment it did not distract from the story.  There are a few twists in the plot, some predictable others not as much. Without giving away too much, I enjoyed the different series of events that lead to the children being trapped inside a supper store.

I was happy to read that there will be a sequel coming out next year. This explains the cliffhanger ending - I finished the book thinking, "What happens? I  need to know more." and ran to research if there was a sequel. 

Readers who like apocalyptic novels and books such as Trapped by Michael Northtrop and the Last Survivors Trilogy by Susan Beth  Pfeffer will enjoy Monument 14. With lots of action and an extremely fast pace, this novel keeps moving and will keep readers turning pages

Was this review helpful to you? 
Had Dean known the destruction that would occur on his way to school, he might not have run to make the bus. After a freakish rock hailstorm causes the bus to crash, killing many of the passengers, Dean and several others manage to escape when the elementary bus driver picks them up and crashes the bus right into a Greenway store. Mrs. Wooly helps the children clean up and get to work on making pizza, but then takes off to find help, leaving Brayden in charge. Josie is in shock, Astrid knows how to work the pizza oven, and Dean's brother Alex is a tech geek who realizes that the computer network being down is a very bad thing. The children band together to take care of the elementary students. Niko, who lives in the mountains and is a Boy Scout, tries to get everyone to conserve energy and supplies. The devastation was caused by a volcano, which sets off a tsunami that takes out the East coast and also causes an earth quake in Colorado, where the story is set. The earthquake damages NORAD facilities and releases toxic chemicals into the air that affect people differently based on their blood type. Things look exceedingly grim, and the students deal with this in their own way. Brayden and his friend cope by drinking and playing laser tag, Josie sets up a school for the children, and Dean finds himself in charge of food with 8-year-old Batiste. Eventually, everyone feels that they should leave the store, but what will they find on the outside?
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
3.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Karen Yingling, Editor Reviewed by Karen Yingling, Editor June 11, 2012
Last updated: June 14, 2012
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (346)

Apocalyptic Times

Had Dean known the destruction that would occur on his way to school, he might not have run to make the bus. After a freakish rock hailstorm causes the bus to crash, killing many of the passengers, Dean and several others manage to escape when the elementary bus driver picks them up and crashes the bus right into a Greenway store. Mrs. Wooly helps the children clean up and get to work on making pizza, but then takes off to find help, leaving Brayden in charge. Josie is in shock, Astrid knows how to work the pizza oven, and Dean's brother Alex is a tech geek who realizes that the computer network being down is a very bad thing. The children band together to take care of the elementary students. Niko, who lives in the mountains and is a Boy Scout, tries to get everyone to conserve energy and supplies. The devastation was caused by a volcano, which sets off a tsunami that takes out the East coast and also causes an earth quake in Colorado, where the story is set. The earthquake damages NORAD facilities and releases toxic chemicals into the air that affect people differently based on their blood type. Things look exceedingly grim, and the students deal with this in their own way. Brayden and his friend cope by drinking and playing laser tag, Josie sets up a school for the children, and Dean finds himself in charge of food with 8-year-old Batiste. Eventually, everyone feels that they should leave the store, but what will they find on the outside?

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User reviews

Average user rating from: 3 user(s)

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Overall rating 
 
4.1
Plot 
 
4.0  (3)
Characters 
 
3.7  (3)
Writing Style 
 
4.7  (3)
Guys, I just can’t even right now. Seriously, how has this book gotten by with so little recognition?

You all know I love me some dystopian, but apocalypse books are basically the next best thing and Monument 14 is definitely one of the best I’ve ever read. Most apocalypse stories surround one main event (zombies attacking, global warming, etc.), but Laybourne just kind of throws everything at you. Yes, everything is pretty much caused by one main thing, but it ripples out into multiple disasters that are just as catastrophic. I don’t want to give too much away since the less you know the more you can immerse yourself in the story.

The writing style took a bit to get used to at first. I think the best way to describe it is stark. There are no extravagant descriptions or anything of the sort but I really think it works for the story’s advantage. It reads almost like a journal and it wouldn’t be as believable if it was written any other way.

I really wasn’t sure if I’d be able to deal with all the whiny little kids and the few (pardon my French) super douchey guys at first. I was kind of afraid it’d turn into a Lord of the Flies thing with kids eating each other or something, but it didn’t. In the end, the kids were all like a little family and I found myself laughing and tearing up right along with them. Those little kids were the best comic relief possible. It wasn’t like throwing a token funny character into the mix. Their young age and innocence made everything that much funnier.

The Nutshell If a survival story about kids trapped in a superstore interests you then go pick up Monument 14 immediately. You’ll get that and so much more. It’s about survival, yes, but it’s also about the bonds that can be formed in crazy situations between the people you’d never expect. Basically, this book is freaking awesome.

Direct Hit
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Jasmine Reviewed by Jasmine November 05, 2012
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (323)

Monument 14 (A Room with Books review)

Guys, I just can’t even right now. Seriously, how has this book gotten by with so little recognition?

You all know I love me some dystopian, but apocalypse books are basically the next best thing and Monument 14 is definitely one of the best I’ve ever read. Most apocalypse stories surround one main event (zombies attacking, global warming, etc.), but Laybourne just kind of throws everything at you. Yes, everything is pretty much caused by one main thing, but it ripples out into multiple disasters that are just as catastrophic. I don’t want to give too much away since the less you know the more you can immerse yourself in the story.

The writing style took a bit to get used to at first. I think the best way to describe it is stark. There are no extravagant descriptions or anything of the sort but I really think it works for the story’s advantage. It reads almost like a journal and it wouldn’t be as believable if it was written any other way.

I really wasn’t sure if I’d be able to deal with all the whiny little kids and the few (pardon my French) super douchey guys at first. I was kind of afraid it’d turn into a Lord of the Flies thing with kids eating each other or something, but it didn’t. In the end, the kids were all like a little family and I found myself laughing and tearing up right along with them. Those little kids were the best comic relief possible. It wasn’t like throwing a token funny character into the mix. Their young age and innocence made everything that much funnier.

The Nutshell If a survival story about kids trapped in a superstore interests you then go pick up Monument 14 immediately. You’ll get that and so much more. It’s about survival, yes, but it’s also about the bonds that can be formed in crazy situations between the people you’d never expect. Basically, this book is freaking awesome.

Direct Hit

Was this review helpful to you? 
One occasional perk (or onus) of being behind on my NetGalley reads is that I see people's reviews come out about particular titles on my pile. Although I don't read reviews for books in my tbr pile in full, I do glance at the rating and the intro and conclusion to the review. Having seen some meh reviews of Monument 14 from some bloggers I love, I was afraid this was going to be a tough read for me. Thankfully, I really enjoyed reading it all the way through.

The opening scene of Monument 14 is seriously intense. It opens with Dean and Alex running for their respective buses. Normal morning of avoiding notice on the bus (yeah, I remember doing that). Then, BAM, hail the size of like cats and dogs is slamming down, and their bus is crashing. Then death and explosions and a bus driving through the glass doors of a grocery store. In a post-apocalyptic (even more than a dystopia), you need to be prepared for MASSIVE amounts of death. You definitely get it here.

What went wrong in the world to cause all these crazies? Just about everything. A super volcano explodes and sets off a tsunami that takes out the east coast. All of this craziness means the environment has gone totally WHACK, so enter hailstorms and other craziness all over the country. In case that wasn't enough, the weather loosed chemicals the government probably shouldn't have created that do seriously creepy (and varying) shit to people who encounter them. Youch. I thought that was maybe a BIT much. Anyway, very The Day After Tomorrow.

I really liked Dean as a narrator. Laybourne did a great job with him I thought. He definitely felt like a male character to me. He is smart, although not brilliant, and desperate to fit in. Being stuck in the Greenway with the kind of guys who pick on him and the popular senior he's been crushing on is a combination nightmare and dream.

There's a sense of unreality to the kids in a store plot line. There's something vaguely romantic about it, right? Freed of adults and able to eat candy for dinner or ice cream for breakfast. The reason it happens over and over again in books is that it makes a really good setting. It's an isolated little universe, and the characters put there have to redefine themselves in the context of this new group, as seen in The Breakfast Club.

Although they have their issues (drugs, overly-flirtatious thirteen year old girls, fistfights, lack of personal space, a couple bratty kids, etc.), these kids are remarkably resourceful, and do an amazing job setting up their own little community within the story. Most of their decisions were wise. They worked most things out, and I loved that they did so without coercion. They ran a better government than the real world. It was amazing that they did so well with so many little ones to take care of.

The kids also have to struggle with trusting one another. Only a couple of them were actually real life friends. Now, the fourteen of them have to learn to at least tolerate one another. They also have to decide whether they can trust anyone else. Since they have so many resources, can they afford to let people in?

I have to mention quickly two plot holes that irked me. First, why did the bus driver leave the kids in the grocery store alone?!?! I mean, I know why, but I was yelling at my computer when she did that. I mean, it was freaking hailing and she's all like 'Peace out!' Dude, if I were her, I would wait and try to check the radios or whatever in the store (like the kids were smart enough to do) without going outside. That just felt too much like it happened to move the plot along. The other thing that really annoyed me was that none of the kids mourned for any of their classmates that DIED IN FRONT OF THEM ON THE BUS. Really kids? Josie is in shock for a couple of days over her friend's death, but then never mentions her again. WTF is that?

Also, having read this so far in advance, which is not my usual style, I've had the chance to read some other reviews on Monument 14. What bothered a lot of reviewers was the portrayal of women in the book. Looking back, I definitely agree that the three women of an age to be sexual are not portrayed well at all. They did seem like fairly believable characters, but it would be nice to see a more positive attitude towards females in the next book. I think the reason I wasn't up in arms about this was that the guys don't really come off so well, either. Most of the characters are varying degrees of not awesome people.

Despite those issues, I freaking ate up all of the drama and disaster in here. Monument 14 is a fast, action-packed ride, and I will most definitely be reading more. Then ending suggests more crazy drama is in store, although I'm not really sure how I feel about where it's going. Most people loved the ending, but one of my least favorite plot points happened. Haha. It IS intense, though.
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
2.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0

Definite Issues, But Still Had Me on the Edge of My Seat

One occasional perk (or onus) of being behind on my NetGalley reads is that I see people's reviews come out about particular titles on my pile. Although I don't read reviews for books in my tbr pile in full, I do glance at the rating and the intro and conclusion to the review. Having seen some meh reviews of Monument 14 from some bloggers I love, I was afraid this was going to be a tough read for me. Thankfully, I really enjoyed reading it all the way through.

The opening scene of Monument 14 is seriously intense. It opens with Dean and Alex running for their respective buses. Normal morning of avoiding notice on the bus (yeah, I remember doing that). Then, BAM, hail the size of like cats and dogs is slamming down, and their bus is crashing. Then death and explosions and a bus driving through the glass doors of a grocery store. In a post-apocalyptic (even more than a dystopia), you need to be prepared for MASSIVE amounts of death. You definitely get it here.

What went wrong in the world to cause all these crazies? Just about everything. A super volcano explodes and sets off a tsunami that takes out the east coast. All of this craziness means the environment has gone totally WHACK, so enter hailstorms and other craziness all over the country. In case that wasn't enough, the weather loosed chemicals the government probably shouldn't have created that do seriously creepy (and varying) shit to people who encounter them. Youch. I thought that was maybe a BIT much. Anyway, very The Day After Tomorrow.

I really liked Dean as a narrator. Laybourne did a great job with him I thought. He definitely felt like a male character to me. He is smart, although not brilliant, and desperate to fit in. Being stuck in the Greenway with the kind of guys who pick on him and the popular senior he's been crushing on is a combination nightmare and dream.

There's a sense of unreality to the kids in a store plot line. There's something vaguely romantic about it, right? Freed of adults and able to eat candy for dinner or ice cream for breakfast. The reason it happens over and over again in books is that it makes a really good setting. It's an isolated little universe, and the characters put there have to redefine themselves in the context of this new group, as seen in The Breakfast Club.

Although they have their issues (drugs, overly-flirtatious thirteen year old girls, fistfights, lack of personal space, a couple bratty kids, etc.), these kids are remarkably resourceful, and do an amazing job setting up their own little community within the story. Most of their decisions were wise. They worked most things out, and I loved that they did so without coercion. They ran a better government than the real world. It was amazing that they did so well with so many little ones to take care of.

The kids also have to struggle with trusting one another. Only a couple of them were actually real life friends. Now, the fourteen of them have to learn to at least tolerate one another. They also have to decide whether they can trust anyone else. Since they have so many resources, can they afford to let people in?

I have to mention quickly two plot holes that irked me. First, why did the bus driver leave the kids in the grocery store alone?!?! I mean, I know why, but I was yelling at my computer when she did that. I mean, it was freaking hailing and she's all like 'Peace out!' Dude, if I were her, I would wait and try to check the radios or whatever in the store (like the kids were smart enough to do) without going outside. That just felt too much like it happened to move the plot along. The other thing that really annoyed me was that none of the kids mourned for any of their classmates that DIED IN FRONT OF THEM ON THE BUS. Really kids? Josie is in shock for a couple of days over her friend's death, but then never mentions her again. WTF is that?

Also, having read this so far in advance, which is not my usual style, I've had the chance to read some other reviews on Monument 14. What bothered a lot of reviewers was the portrayal of women in the book. Looking back, I definitely agree that the three women of an age to be sexual are not portrayed well at all. They did seem like fairly believable characters, but it would be nice to see a more positive attitude towards females in the next book. I think the reason I wasn't up in arms about this was that the guys don't really come off so well, either. Most of the characters are varying degrees of not awesome people.

Despite those issues, I freaking ate up all of the drama and disaster in here. Monument 14 is a fast, action-packed ride, and I will most definitely be reading more. Then ending suggests more crazy drama is in store, although I'm not really sure how I feel about where it's going. Most people loved the ending, but one of my least favorite plot points happened. Haha. It IS intense, though.

Was this review helpful to you? 
I’d been waiting to read this book for a while and I’m glad it didn’t disappoint me. What I liked most of this book was the Dean’s sincerity. Just because the world seems to be ending people don’t need to start acting like saints (I guess I’m evil). His feelings and desires kept on going Ah! Yes, in case you’re wonder who this Dean is, he is the main character.

Fourteen kids are trapped in a superstore (think Walmart, or Target) and they have to learn to trust and deal with each other in order to survive. They are mean and they don’t hold their tongues back. They are tired of taking care of the little ones and the bigger ones are not exactly fan of each other.
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Lectus Reviewed by Lectus August 11, 2012
Last updated: August 11, 2012
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (9)

Good!

I’d been waiting to read this book for a while and I’m glad it didn’t disappoint me. What I liked most of this book was the Dean’s sincerity. Just because the world seems to be ending people don’t need to start acting like saints (I guess I’m evil). His feelings and desires kept on going Ah! Yes, in case you’re wonder who this Dean is, he is the main character.

Fourteen kids are trapped in a superstore (think Walmart, or Target) and they have to learn to trust and deal with each other in order to survive. They are mean and they don’t hold their tongues back. They are tired of taking care of the little ones and the bigger ones are not exactly fan of each other.

Was this review helpful to you? 
 
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