Books Young Adult Fiction The Fault In Our Stars

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4.5 (2)
 
4.8 (44)
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Author(s)
Age Range
14+
Release Date
January 10, 2012
ISBN
0525478817
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Diagnosed with Stage IV thyroid cancer at 12, Hazel was prepared to die until, at 14, a medical miracle shrunk the tumours in her lungs... for now.

Two years post-miracle, sixteen-year-old Hazel is post-everything else, too; post-high school, post-friends and post-normalcy. And even though she could live for a long time (whatever that means), Hazel lives tethered to an oxygen tank, the tumours tenuously kept at bay with a constant chemical assault.

Enter Augustus Waters. A match made at cancer kid support group, Augustus is gorgeous, in remission, and shockingly to her, interested in Hazel. Being with Augustus is both an unexpected destination and a long-needed journey, pushing Hazel to re-examine how sickness and health, life and death, will define her and the legacy that everyone leaves behind.

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Average editor rating from: 2 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
4.5
Plot 
 
4.5  (2)
Characters 
 
4.5  (2)
Writing Style 
 
4.5  (2)

I spent an entire year mentally preparing myself for The Fault in Our Stars. I read some terrible books, awesome books and your classic "meh" books. And whenever I'd go to decide which book I wanted to read next, I'd glance at The Fault in Our Stars' spine and simply turn my head away. To be completely honest, I don't think I have ever truly went out of my way to avoid a book like this and it's unlike me to do so. I usually tackle things head on, showing no fear, but with this book I had to approach things differently due to its subject matter. But then Jenn from The Bawdy Book Blog threw this in as a review suggestion, because obviously I needed some John Green edumacation. And I'm so happy someone finally pushed me to read this book because it did not disappoint. Well, not exactly...

It's easy to see why John Green has the following he does. There is just something magical in the way he strings his sentences together that I can't help but admire it. It's simple, deep and humorous all at the same time. And the biggest thing I worried about when diving into this book was the sadness. You go into the book knowing the characters are terminal and I didn't know how I would fair connecting with a character, loving a character, to ultimately have them suffer and die. I'm a really easy crier and I don't like seeing people (fictional or real) suffer. But somehow John Green manages to take a cancer book and fill it with the sweetest memories.

For a good portion of The Fault in Our Stars, I found myself chuckling at Hazel and Augustus' dry humor. The first half was generally light-hearted despite the grim situation the characters were in. Even when things got more serious, the humor was subtly there as a convenient ice-breaker of sorts. If I could describe it, I'd liken it to a grandparent making a joke about their impending death. It's awkward and uncomfortable, but oddly reassuring that it's possible to joke about something so morbid. Life goes on.

The plot was simply "ok" for me, never wowing me or keeping me on the edge of my seat. It, at times, seemed to just float by with occasional things happening. There weren't many plot twists or "ah ha!" moments because you could tell from the beginning how it would end. You knew from the subject matter that it would be sad, and yet... I did not really cry. I did shed The Lonely Tear, but it wasn't for the characters. It was because of the situation they were in. It was because cancer sucks. Don't get me wrong, this is a beautifully written book, but the problem I ran into was the questionable authenticity of the protagonists. They never felt like teenagers. I get that they were intelligent and spent a lot more time contemplating life than your average teen, but they never felt real to me. Now, I'm not exactly a stranger to John Green himself. I religiously watch his history webshow on Youtube and I'm often amazed at this guy. But it was like he sat down and created mini-Despicable-Me-minon-like John Greens for this novel. They are all witty, super intelligent and too pretentious for their own good.

Further, it was almost like Green relied on the severity of the ending and the character's intelligence to jar emotion from the reader. Clearly, this worked since two weeks after finishing, I cried while making pancakes just from thinking about Augustus' letter to Hazel. But again, this was not for the characters. It wasn't remotely similar or as powerful of an emotion that I'd felt after I read A Walk to Remember where I cried in my 8th grade English class under my desk. I'm talking about complete and utter sorrow for Landon and everyone else. DON'T JUDGE ME. :P

Anyway, while I remain conflicted on how I feel about the characters, it doesn't negate the fact that this is a fabulous, smart read that I'd recommend to others.
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0

Beautifully Written

I spent an entire year mentally preparing myself for The Fault in Our Stars. I read some terrible books, awesome books and your classic "meh" books. And whenever I'd go to decide which book I wanted to read next, I'd glance at The Fault in Our Stars' spine and simply turn my head away. To be completely honest, I don't think I have ever truly went out of my way to avoid a book like this and it's unlike me to do so. I usually tackle things head on, showing no fear, but with this book I had to approach things differently due to its subject matter. But then Jenn from The Bawdy Book Blog threw this in as a review suggestion, because obviously I needed some John Green edumacation. And I'm so happy someone finally pushed me to read this book because it did not disappoint. Well, not exactly...

It's easy to see why John Green has the following he does. There is just something magical in the way he strings his sentences together that I can't help but admire it. It's simple, deep and humorous all at the same time. And the biggest thing I worried about when diving into this book was the sadness. You go into the book knowing the characters are terminal and I didn't know how I would fair connecting with a character, loving a character, to ultimately have them suffer and die. I'm a really easy crier and I don't like seeing people (fictional or real) suffer. But somehow John Green manages to take a cancer book and fill it with the sweetest memories.

For a good portion of The Fault in Our Stars, I found myself chuckling at Hazel and Augustus' dry humor. The first half was generally light-hearted despite the grim situation the characters were in. Even when things got more serious, the humor was subtly there as a convenient ice-breaker of sorts. If I could describe it, I'd liken it to a grandparent making a joke about their impending death. It's awkward and uncomfortable, but oddly reassuring that it's possible to joke about something so morbid. Life goes on.

The plot was simply "ok" for me, never wowing me or keeping me on the edge of my seat. It, at times, seemed to just float by with occasional things happening. There weren't many plot twists or "ah ha!" moments because you could tell from the beginning how it would end. You knew from the subject matter that it would be sad, and yet... I did not really cry. I did shed The Lonely Tear, but it wasn't for the characters. It was because of the situation they were in. It was because cancer sucks. Don't get me wrong, this is a beautifully written book, but the problem I ran into was the questionable authenticity of the protagonists. They never felt like teenagers. I get that they were intelligent and spent a lot more time contemplating life than your average teen, but they never felt real to me. Now, I'm not exactly a stranger to John Green himself. I religiously watch his history webshow on Youtube and I'm often amazed at this guy. But it was like he sat down and created mini-Despicable-Me-minon-like John Greens for this novel. They are all witty, super intelligent and too pretentious for their own good.

Further, it was almost like Green relied on the severity of the ending and the character's intelligence to jar emotion from the reader. Clearly, this worked since two weeks after finishing, I cried while making pancakes just from thinking about Augustus' letter to Hazel. But again, this was not for the characters. It wasn't remotely similar or as powerful of an emotion that I'd felt after I read A Walk to Remember where I cried in my 8th grade English class under my desk. I'm talking about complete and utter sorrow for Landon and everyone else. DON'T JUDGE ME. :P

Anyway, while I remain conflicted on how I feel about the characters, it doesn't negate the fact that this is a fabulous, smart read that I'd recommend to others.

Was this review helpful to you? 
You guys. This book.

I have to share the original moment I lived while reading this book. I was on the bus, riding home from our field trip to a science museum, sharing a seat with a 6th grade girl who used JUSTIN BIEBER twice as her word in our morning games of Hangman. I was a bawling mess over the book, so these sweeties were trying to comfort me, while also asking me to try on the mustache-shaped mood ring they bought at the gift shop so they could see what color "sad" is. I love being a teacher.

Anyway, back to John Green's masterpiece. If you read young adult literature, you've probably already heard tons about this novel about two star-crossed teenagers who have cancer. I really don't want to give any of the plot away, so I will share how much I loved the main characters, Hazel and Augustus.

Hazel is the type of sixteen year old we all wish we were (without the cancer, obviously). She is wise and funny, beautiful and confident, plus she gets along well with her parents. The novel is almost overwhelmingly sad, but it is Hazel's narration that prevents it from going over the edge. Her sarcastic and honest voice had me laughing through my tears.

Augustus Waters is probably the best YA boyfriend to ever be written. He says gorgeous things like, "You are so busy being you that you have no idea how utterly unprecedented you are." His clever, generous heart is what you wish everyone experiences in a lifetime, even if it is far shorter than it should be.

I am the endearing combination of broke and cheap, but this is a hardcover book I was happy to pay for, if only because it makes it easier for me to lend it to everyone I know.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0

My New Favorite Book

You guys. This book.

I have to share the original moment I lived while reading this book. I was on the bus, riding home from our field trip to a science museum, sharing a seat with a 6th grade girl who used JUSTIN BIEBER twice as her word in our morning games of Hangman. I was a bawling mess over the book, so these sweeties were trying to comfort me, while also asking me to try on the mustache-shaped mood ring they bought at the gift shop so they could see what color "sad" is. I love being a teacher.

Anyway, back to John Green's masterpiece. If you read young adult literature, you've probably already heard tons about this novel about two star-crossed teenagers who have cancer. I really don't want to give any of the plot away, so I will share how much I loved the main characters, Hazel and Augustus.

Hazel is the type of sixteen year old we all wish we were (without the cancer, obviously). She is wise and funny, beautiful and confident, plus she gets along well with her parents. The novel is almost overwhelmingly sad, but it is Hazel's narration that prevents it from going over the edge. Her sarcastic and honest voice had me laughing through my tears.

Augustus Waters is probably the best YA boyfriend to ever be written. He says gorgeous things like, "You are so busy being you that you have no idea how utterly unprecedented you are." His clever, generous heart is what you wish everyone experiences in a lifetime, even if it is far shorter than it should be.

I am the endearing combination of broke and cheap, but this is a hardcover book I was happy to pay for, if only because it makes it easier for me to lend it to everyone I know.

Was this review helpful to you? 
 

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Overall rating 
 
4.8
Plot 
 
4.7  (44)
Characters 
 
4.8  (44)
Writing Style 
 
4.9  (44)
This was an absolutely beautiful book. It was actually the first, and one of the only, books to make me sob. It was heartbreaking, and I've read it three times since I got it last November. The characters are beautifully written, and absolutely lovable. I can't say much, as I don't want to give away anything, but if you've not read it, you must do so.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Oswin Holmes Reviewed by Oswin Holmes July 26, 2014
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Beautiful

This was an absolutely beautiful book. It was actually the first, and one of the only, books to make me sob. It was heartbreaking, and I've read it three times since I got it last November. The characters are beautifully written, and absolutely lovable. I can't say much, as I don't want to give away anything, but if you've not read it, you must do so.

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This book.......What can I say this book was amazing. I love the way John Green writes, he is witty, humorous, and he tells it how it is. That's one of the things I like in this book is that he doesn't sugar coat it. I've read many books with the "and they lived happily ever after" and this book is the complete opposite of that. You don't always have the perfect relationship or a perfect life, this book deals with real problems that people go through. I loved the characters and I think they where well written compared to some other books I've read. This book just overwhelms you with so many emotions. Yes it was sad but John Green makes it feel okay and that its not the end. Leaving you more that satisfied by the end of the book. I also really love the chemistry all the characters had with each other and ohh my goodness Augustus Waters!! Augustus he just has this attitude about him that you just cant help but fall for and Hazel, she is just so honest, confident, and strong. Honestly Hazel is like a role model, to have the strength she has and who she is just made this book so much more amazing. I loved this book and have recommended it to all of my friends and I believe it is truly a book worth reading.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Brianna Laseman Reviewed by Brianna Laseman July 01, 2014
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Truly Astonishing

This book.......What can I say this book was amazing. I love the way John Green writes, he is witty, humorous, and he tells it how it is. That's one of the things I like in this book is that he doesn't sugar coat it. I've read many books with the "and they lived happily ever after" and this book is the complete opposite of that. You don't always have the perfect relationship or a perfect life, this book deals with real problems that people go through. I loved the characters and I think they where well written compared to some other books I've read. This book just overwhelms you with so many emotions. Yes it was sad but John Green makes it feel okay and that its not the end. Leaving you more that satisfied by the end of the book. I also really love the chemistry all the characters had with each other and ohh my goodness Augustus Waters!! Augustus he just has this attitude about him that you just cant help but fall for and Hazel, she is just so honest, confident, and strong. Honestly Hazel is like a role model, to have the strength she has and who she is just made this book so much more amazing. I loved this book and have recommended it to all of my friends and I believe it is truly a book worth reading.

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what to say about a book that deals with things that amny people wouldn't write about.
Hazle ia a young girl which we sould all look up to. i dont have much to say but (fangirling here) FEELS!!!!
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
leigh-ann Reviewed by leigh-ann June 19, 2014
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amazing

what to say about a book that deals with things that amny people wouldn't write about.
Hazle ia a young girl which we sould all look up to. i dont have much to say but (fangirling here) FEELS!!!!

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“Pain demands to be felt.”

Hazel Grace Lancaster, a terminal cancer patient (“thyroid originally but with an impressive and long-settled satellite colony in (her) lungs”), who uses an oxygen tank wherever she goes, thinks the only think someone should expect of life is dying. But, after a twist ,named Augustus Walters, whose leg was claimed by a bone tumor , appears on her boring routine , her life with take an unpredictable turn. Hazel (she is the narrator of the story) and Augustus meet at a cancer support group. Thou they are “very different and disagreed about a lot of things,” they always find a way to make their relationship interesting.

John Green create such well crafted characters, and an amazing, never boring plot, it’s inevitable not to love this book.
Loved how Gus (Augustus) loves Hazel even thou he know it’s gong to hurt him sooner or later.

“Hazel Grace…it would be a privilege to have my heart broken by you.”

But not only Gus is suffering (but may not show it) with Hazel’s condition, her parents have to deal with the idea that their only daughter is going to died sooner than they thought. It broke my heart how Hazel’s mom thought she “won’t be a mom any more,” after Hazel dies, which is inevitable. Hazel is “the alpha and omega of (their) suffering.”

The Fault in Our Stars is the best love story written , yet. Romeo and Juliet. Who?
John Green made us fall in love with his characters and the story itself.

“It’s easy enough to win over people you meet. But getting strangers to love you…now that’s the trick.”

And in the process (of falling in love with the characters) “we (the readers) were all wounded in (their) battle.” A courageous battle.
Like Hazel says, “the world is not a wish-granting factory.” but (in my opinion) for Gus and her, it made an exception to give their love a “a little infinity.”

“Some infinities are bigger than other infinities.”

Their love was a piece of “forever within the numbered days.” They enjoyed their time together “on a roller coaster that only goes up.’

Thou the book deals with cancer (tragic and sad), it mixes humor without being cruel.

“He’s not that smart,” I said to Julie.
“She’s right. It’s just the most really good-looking people are stupid, so I exceed expectations.”
“Right, it’s primarily his hotness,” I said.
“It can be sort of blinding,” he said.
“It actually did blind our friend Isaac,” I said.
“Terrible tragedy, that. But can I help my own deadly beauty?”
“You cannot.”
“It is my burden, this beautiful face.”
“Not to mention your body.”
“seriously, don’t even get me started on my hot bod. You don’t want to see me naked, Dave. Seeing me naked actually took Hazel Grace’s breath away,” he said, nodding toward the oxygen tank.

This book teach us “the most important lesson of all: No matter how hard you kick, no matter how high you get, you can’t go all the way around.”
I’m thankful for the “little infinity” Green gave me with this lovely story. Still, “my thoughts (about this book) are stars I can’t fathom into constellations.”
Loved this heart-growing book. My heart feels like it’s full and in any minute is going to explode like a grenade. Or it could be all the crying I went through will reading it and after finishing it. 5 (okay maybe 6 or more) Stars
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Viviana Ortiz Reviewed by Viviana Ortiz June 18, 2014
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (38)

Genius

“Pain demands to be felt.”

Hazel Grace Lancaster, a terminal cancer patient (“thyroid originally but with an impressive and long-settled satellite colony in (her) lungs”), who uses an oxygen tank wherever she goes, thinks the only think someone should expect of life is dying. But, after a twist ,named Augustus Walters, whose leg was claimed by a bone tumor , appears on her boring routine , her life with take an unpredictable turn. Hazel (she is the narrator of the story) and Augustus meet at a cancer support group. Thou they are “very different and disagreed about a lot of things,” they always find a way to make their relationship interesting.

John Green create such well crafted characters, and an amazing, never boring plot, it’s inevitable not to love this book.
Loved how Gus (Augustus) loves Hazel even thou he know it’s gong to hurt him sooner or later.

“Hazel Grace…it would be a privilege to have my heart broken by you.”

But not only Gus is suffering (but may not show it) with Hazel’s condition, her parents have to deal with the idea that their only daughter is going to died sooner than they thought. It broke my heart how Hazel’s mom thought she “won’t be a mom any more,” after Hazel dies, which is inevitable. Hazel is “the alpha and omega of (their) suffering.”

The Fault in Our Stars is the best love story written , yet. Romeo and Juliet. Who?
John Green made us fall in love with his characters and the story itself.

“It’s easy enough to win over people you meet. But getting strangers to love you…now that’s the trick.”

And in the process (of falling in love with the characters) “we (the readers) were all wounded in (their) battle.” A courageous battle.
Like Hazel says, “the world is not a wish-granting factory.” but (in my opinion) for Gus and her, it made an exception to give their love a “a little infinity.”

“Some infinities are bigger than other infinities.”

Their love was a piece of “forever within the numbered days.” They enjoyed their time together “on a roller coaster that only goes up.’

Thou the book deals with cancer (tragic and sad), it mixes humor without being cruel.

“He’s not that smart,” I said to Julie.
“She’s right. It’s just the most really good-looking people are stupid, so I exceed expectations.”
“Right, it’s primarily his hotness,” I said.
“It can be sort of blinding,” he said.
“It actually did blind our friend Isaac,” I said.
“Terrible tragedy, that. But can I help my own deadly beauty?”
“You cannot.”
“It is my burden, this beautiful face.”
“Not to mention your body.”
“seriously, don’t even get me started on my hot bod. You don’t want to see me naked, Dave. Seeing me naked actually took Hazel Grace’s breath away,” he said, nodding toward the oxygen tank.

This book teach us “the most important lesson of all: No matter how hard you kick, no matter how high you get, you can’t go all the way around.”
I’m thankful for the “little infinity” Green gave me with this lovely story. Still, “my thoughts (about this book) are stars I can’t fathom into constellations.”
Loved this heart-growing book. My heart feels like it’s full and in any minute is going to explode like a grenade. Or it could be all the crying I went through will reading it and after finishing it. 5 (okay maybe 6 or more) Stars

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The fault really is in our self. It was this book whom showed us in such a small amount of time we can live a meaningful life. Thank you John Green, Hazel Grace Lancaster, Augustus Waters,Isaac, and everything/everyone else in that entire book.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Sherifa Alabi Reviewed by Sherifa Alabi June 03, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (5)

The Fault In Our selfs

The fault really is in our self. It was this book whom showed us in such a small amount of time we can live a meaningful life. Thank you John Green, Hazel Grace Lancaster, Augustus Waters,Isaac, and everything/everyone else in that entire book.

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I've been liking most of his stuff actually
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Luna Kay Reviewed by Luna Kay May 26, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (3)

another good book by john green

I've been liking most of his stuff actually

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The Fault In Our Stars by John Green is a beautiful, heart warming book which should be read by every teen out there.

The Characters in the book, you can't help but love them. The fantastic humour between Augustus and Hazel is just a joy to read, and you love being able to be with these two people and be able to see them grow as a couple. The fact they both are victims of cancer, makes the whole thing more special and the way they se life and death is an inspiration. The ideas that you should enjoy the moment and not look at how and when you will cease to be and enjoy the moment when it lasts.

The plot isn't a ground breaking plot, but it is fine to show the special connection between Hazel and Augustus. The way this book has also ben written is a joy to read and the whole read was effortless and it's a book that can be read many times.

Overall, this is a very deep and brilliant book which fantastically explores the boundaries between living and dying and is a joy to read.
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
3.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Joshua Pyne Reviewed by Joshua Pyne February 28, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (5)

The Fault In Our Stars

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green is a beautiful, heart warming book which should be read by every teen out there.

The Characters in the book, you can't help but love them. The fantastic humour between Augustus and Hazel is just a joy to read, and you love being able to be with these two people and be able to see them grow as a couple. The fact they both are victims of cancer, makes the whole thing more special and the way they se life and death is an inspiration. The ideas that you should enjoy the moment and not look at how and when you will cease to be and enjoy the moment when it lasts.

The plot isn't a ground breaking plot, but it is fine to show the special connection between Hazel and Augustus. The way this book has also ben written is a joy to read and the whole read was effortless and it's a book that can be read many times.

Overall, this is a very deep and brilliant book which fantastically explores the boundaries between living and dying and is a joy to read.

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If I told you what this book was about and the genre you would think I was out of my mind to give it 5 stars. But seriously, I couldn't put it down, it is sarcastic and funny and I think everyone should read it.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Louise Cosgrave Reviewed by Louise Cosgrave February 20, 2014
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (25)

Brilliant

If I told you what this book was about and the genre you would think I was out of my mind to give it 5 stars. But seriously, I couldn't put it down, it is sarcastic and funny and I think everyone should read it.

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The Fault in Our Stars tells the story of Hazel a sixteen year old who survived lung cancer but still is affected by it physically - she has breathing difficulties. Hazel separates herself from the things she did before she had cancer and thus leaving her isolated from the world apart from her (useless) friend. Her mother pushes/forces her to go to a cancer support group (because she spends her time rereading the same book over and over again and because she maybe depressed) and that is where she meets Gus.

I knew from the interactions and the dialogue between Hazel and Gus that their romance was going to be awesome. Even though a lot of people are saying that they speak like 60 year old's or whatever but the way they spoke (I think personally) is like they thought about every word and the impact of it. There was something unique about them, it was like there was meanings to even the simplest words. Even though Hazel tries to push Gus away because she's afraid for herself and for him Gus still breaks through Hazel's walls and they have the shortest and sweetest relationship.

Gus is so sweet, like personally I would never share my wish with anybody and he gives his away to a girl he barely knows. Must be love. What he does to get Hazel to meet her favourite author is just like - flying all the way to Amsterdam - he even writes letters to the author's assistant and his charm made him the only one to get a reply. He took the risk of falling in love even though he knew he would get his heart broken following his past experiences with his ex and his cancer. And when he broke down he called Hazel first, he trusted her.

Okay. What a romantic word. It's like one of the simplest words ever with multiple meanings to it. Using Okay shows that even the most simple things can hold the deepest memories.

Like 99% of the reader I did cry like I promised myself I wouldn't.
I cried when Gus told Hazel and Isaac to read their eulogies. How Gus got through that I have no clue.
I cried when Gus's cancer came back and how it affected him.
I cried when Gus died and Hazel was an emotional wreck.

But - I did smile when Isaac threw eggs at his ex's car with Hazel and Gus cheering him on.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Aisha Ali Reviewed by Aisha Ali February 16, 2014
  -   View all my reviews (1)

The Fault in Our Stars

The Fault in Our Stars tells the story of Hazel a sixteen year old who survived lung cancer but still is affected by it physically - she has breathing difficulties. Hazel separates herself from the things she did before she had cancer and thus leaving her isolated from the world apart from her (useless) friend. Her mother pushes/forces her to go to a cancer support group (because she spends her time rereading the same book over and over again and because she maybe depressed) and that is where she meets Gus.

I knew from the interactions and the dialogue between Hazel and Gus that their romance was going to be awesome. Even though a lot of people are saying that they speak like 60 year old's or whatever but the way they spoke (I think personally) is like they thought about every word and the impact of it. There was something unique about them, it was like there was meanings to even the simplest words. Even though Hazel tries to push Gus away because she's afraid for herself and for him Gus still breaks through Hazel's walls and they have the shortest and sweetest relationship.

Gus is so sweet, like personally I would never share my wish with anybody and he gives his away to a girl he barely knows. Must be love. What he does to get Hazel to meet her favourite author is just like - flying all the way to Amsterdam - he even writes letters to the author's assistant and his charm made him the only one to get a reply. He took the risk of falling in love even though he knew he would get his heart broken following his past experiences with his ex and his cancer. And when he broke down he called Hazel first, he trusted her.

Okay. What a romantic word. It's like one of the simplest words ever with multiple meanings to it. Using Okay shows that even the most simple things can hold the deepest memories.

Like 99% of the reader I did cry like I promised myself I wouldn't.
I cried when Gus told Hazel and Isaac to read their eulogies. How Gus got through that I have no clue.
I cried when Gus's cancer came back and how it affected him.
I cried when Gus died and Hazel was an emotional wreck.

But - I did smile when Isaac threw eggs at his ex's car with Hazel and Gus cheering him on.

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The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is an impelling novel narrated by a sixteen year-old lung cancer patient, Hazel Grace Lancaster. The book is about the misfortunes she will be facing while on a trip to Amsterdam with her boyfriend Augustus Waters, who has amputated his right leg due to bone cancer, and is in remission. Hazel and Augustus then travel to Amsterdam to search for Peter Van Houten, the author of their favorite book, An Imperial Affliction. While returning from the trip Augustus reveals some bitter news to Hazel, which drives the story plot to a turning point.
I genuinely liked the sassy narration of this story. Unfortunately as the strength of the book, it also was a weakness: there were times when Hazel and Augustus sounded smarter and savvier than any sixteen-year-old I’ve ever met; even the other characters sometimes shared this abnormal cleverness. As much as I liked Hazel and Augustus, and found them ravishing, I also felt that I could see the author’s shadow in these characters. “It does not taste like God himself cooked heaven into a series of five dishes which were served to you accompanied by several luminous balls fermented, bubbly plasma while actual and literal flower petals floated down all around your canal-side dinner table.” It was constantly in a metaphorically significant action and words, to the extent of being pretentious. There was a certain ingenuity within this narrative, its ironies and references to other cancer books, as well as its sarcastic puns.
Despite its humor and cheekiness, The Fault in Our Stars is definitely a tale of star-crossed lovers, and will surely bring you to a wailing end.
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Plot 
 
3.0
Characters 
 
3.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Areta Reviewed by Areta December 26, 2013
  -   View all my reviews (1)

Achingly Beautiful

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is an impelling novel narrated by a sixteen year-old lung cancer patient, Hazel Grace Lancaster. The book is about the misfortunes she will be facing while on a trip to Amsterdam with her boyfriend Augustus Waters, who has amputated his right leg due to bone cancer, and is in remission. Hazel and Augustus then travel to Amsterdam to search for Peter Van Houten, the author of their favorite book, An Imperial Affliction. While returning from the trip Augustus reveals some bitter news to Hazel, which drives the story plot to a turning point.
I genuinely liked the sassy narration of this story. Unfortunately as the strength of the book, it also was a weakness: there were times when Hazel and Augustus sounded smarter and savvier than any sixteen-year-old I’ve ever met; even the other characters sometimes shared this abnormal cleverness. As much as I liked Hazel and Augustus, and found them ravishing, I also felt that I could see the author’s shadow in these characters. “It does not taste like God himself cooked heaven into a series of five dishes which were served to you accompanied by several luminous balls fermented, bubbly plasma while actual and literal flower petals floated down all around your canal-side dinner table.” It was constantly in a metaphorically significant action and words, to the extent of being pretentious. There was a certain ingenuity within this narrative, its ironies and references to other cancer books, as well as its sarcastic puns.
Despite its humor and cheekiness, The Fault in Our Stars is definitely a tale of star-crossed lovers, and will surely bring you to a wailing end.

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