Books Young Adult Fiction The Fault In Our Stars

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4.5 (2)
 
4.7 (47)
9643   26
Author(s)
Age Range
14+
Release Date
January 10, 2012
ISBN
0525478817
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Diagnosed with Stage IV thyroid cancer at 12, Hazel was prepared to die until, at 14, a medical miracle shrunk the tumours in her lungs... for now.

Two years post-miracle, sixteen-year-old Hazel is post-everything else, too; post-high school, post-friends and post-normalcy. And even though she could live for a long time (whatever that means), Hazel lives tethered to an oxygen tank, the tumours tenuously kept at bay with a constant chemical assault.

Enter Augustus Waters. A match made at cancer kid support group, Augustus is gorgeous, in remission, and shockingly to her, interested in Hazel. Being with Augustus is both an unexpected destination and a long-needed journey, pushing Hazel to re-examine how sickness and health, life and death, will define her and the legacy that everyone leaves behind.

Editor reviews

Average editor rating from: 2 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
4.5
Plot 
 
4.5  (2)
Characters 
 
4.5  (2)
Writing Style 
 
4.5  (2)

I spent an entire year mentally preparing myself for The Fault in Our Stars. I read some terrible books, awesome books and your classic "meh" books. And whenever I'd go to decide which book I wanted to read next, I'd glance at The Fault in Our Stars' spine and simply turn my head away. To be completely honest, I don't think I have ever truly went out of my way to avoid a book like this and it's unlike me to do so. I usually tackle things head on, showing no fear, but with this book I had to approach things differently due to its subject matter. But then Jenn from The Bawdy Book Blog threw this in as a review suggestion, because obviously I needed some John Green edumacation. And I'm so happy someone finally pushed me to read this book because it did not disappoint. Well, not exactly...

It's easy to see why John Green has the following he does. There is just something magical in the way he strings his sentences together that I can't help but admire it. It's simple, deep and humorous all at the same time. And the biggest thing I worried about when diving into this book was the sadness. You go into the book knowing the characters are terminal and I didn't know how I would fair connecting with a character, loving a character, to ultimately have them suffer and die. I'm a really easy crier and I don't like seeing people (fictional or real) suffer. But somehow John Green manages to take a cancer book and fill it with the sweetest memories.

For a good portion of The Fault in Our Stars, I found myself chuckling at Hazel and Augustus' dry humor. The first half was generally light-hearted despite the grim situation the characters were in. Even when things got more serious, the humor was subtly there as a convenient ice-breaker of sorts. If I could describe it, I'd liken it to a grandparent making a joke about their impending death. It's awkward and uncomfortable, but oddly reassuring that it's possible to joke about something so morbid. Life goes on.

The plot was simply "ok" for me, never wowing me or keeping me on the edge of my seat. It, at times, seemed to just float by with occasional things happening. There weren't many plot twists or "ah ha!" moments because you could tell from the beginning how it would end. You knew from the subject matter that it would be sad, and yet... I did not really cry. I did shed The Lonely Tear, but it wasn't for the characters. It was because of the situation they were in. It was because cancer sucks. Don't get me wrong, this is a beautifully written book, but the problem I ran into was the questionable authenticity of the protagonists. They never felt like teenagers. I get that they were intelligent and spent a lot more time contemplating life than your average teen, but they never felt real to me. Now, I'm not exactly a stranger to John Green himself. I religiously watch his history webshow on Youtube and I'm often amazed at this guy. But it was like he sat down and created mini-Despicable-Me-minon-like John Greens for this novel. They are all witty, super intelligent and too pretentious for their own good.

Further, it was almost like Green relied on the severity of the ending and the character's intelligence to jar emotion from the reader. Clearly, this worked since two weeks after finishing, I cried while making pancakes just from thinking about Augustus' letter to Hazel. But again, this was not for the characters. It wasn't remotely similar or as powerful of an emotion that I'd felt after I read A Walk to Remember where I cried in my 8th grade English class under my desk. I'm talking about complete and utter sorrow for Landon and everyone else. DON'T JUDGE ME. :P

Anyway, while I remain conflicted on how I feel about the characters, it doesn't negate the fact that this is a fabulous, smart read that I'd recommend to others.
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0

Beautifully Written

I spent an entire year mentally preparing myself for The Fault in Our Stars. I read some terrible books, awesome books and your classic "meh" books. And whenever I'd go to decide which book I wanted to read next, I'd glance at The Fault in Our Stars' spine and simply turn my head away. To be completely honest, I don't think I have ever truly went out of my way to avoid a book like this and it's unlike me to do so. I usually tackle things head on, showing no fear, but with this book I had to approach things differently due to its subject matter. But then Jenn from The Bawdy Book Blog threw this in as a review suggestion, because obviously I needed some John Green edumacation. And I'm so happy someone finally pushed me to read this book because it did not disappoint. Well, not exactly...

It's easy to see why John Green has the following he does. There is just something magical in the way he strings his sentences together that I can't help but admire it. It's simple, deep and humorous all at the same time. And the biggest thing I worried about when diving into this book was the sadness. You go into the book knowing the characters are terminal and I didn't know how I would fair connecting with a character, loving a character, to ultimately have them suffer and die. I'm a really easy crier and I don't like seeing people (fictional or real) suffer. But somehow John Green manages to take a cancer book and fill it with the sweetest memories.

For a good portion of The Fault in Our Stars, I found myself chuckling at Hazel and Augustus' dry humor. The first half was generally light-hearted despite the grim situation the characters were in. Even when things got more serious, the humor was subtly there as a convenient ice-breaker of sorts. If I could describe it, I'd liken it to a grandparent making a joke about their impending death. It's awkward and uncomfortable, but oddly reassuring that it's possible to joke about something so morbid. Life goes on.

The plot was simply "ok" for me, never wowing me or keeping me on the edge of my seat. It, at times, seemed to just float by with occasional things happening. There weren't many plot twists or "ah ha!" moments because you could tell from the beginning how it would end. You knew from the subject matter that it would be sad, and yet... I did not really cry. I did shed The Lonely Tear, but it wasn't for the characters. It was because of the situation they were in. It was because cancer sucks. Don't get me wrong, this is a beautifully written book, but the problem I ran into was the questionable authenticity of the protagonists. They never felt like teenagers. I get that they were intelligent and spent a lot more time contemplating life than your average teen, but they never felt real to me. Now, I'm not exactly a stranger to John Green himself. I religiously watch his history webshow on Youtube and I'm often amazed at this guy. But it was like he sat down and created mini-Despicable-Me-minon-like John Greens for this novel. They are all witty, super intelligent and too pretentious for their own good.

Further, it was almost like Green relied on the severity of the ending and the character's intelligence to jar emotion from the reader. Clearly, this worked since two weeks after finishing, I cried while making pancakes just from thinking about Augustus' letter to Hazel. But again, this was not for the characters. It wasn't remotely similar or as powerful of an emotion that I'd felt after I read A Walk to Remember where I cried in my 8th grade English class under my desk. I'm talking about complete and utter sorrow for Landon and everyone else. DON'T JUDGE ME. :P

Anyway, while I remain conflicted on how I feel about the characters, it doesn't negate the fact that this is a fabulous, smart read that I'd recommend to others.

Was this review helpful to you? 
You guys. This book.

I have to share the original moment I lived while reading this book. I was on the bus, riding home from our field trip to a science museum, sharing a seat with a 6th grade girl who used JUSTIN BIEBER twice as her word in our morning games of Hangman. I was a bawling mess over the book, so these sweeties were trying to comfort me, while also asking me to try on the mustache-shaped mood ring they bought at the gift shop so they could see what color "sad" is. I love being a teacher.

Anyway, back to John Green's masterpiece. If you read young adult literature, you've probably already heard tons about this novel about two star-crossed teenagers who have cancer. I really don't want to give any of the plot away, so I will share how much I loved the main characters, Hazel and Augustus.

Hazel is the type of sixteen year old we all wish we were (without the cancer, obviously). She is wise and funny, beautiful and confident, plus she gets along well with her parents. The novel is almost overwhelmingly sad, but it is Hazel's narration that prevents it from going over the edge. Her sarcastic and honest voice had me laughing through my tears.

Augustus Waters is probably the best YA boyfriend to ever be written. He says gorgeous things like, "You are so busy being you that you have no idea how utterly unprecedented you are." His clever, generous heart is what you wish everyone experiences in a lifetime, even if it is far shorter than it should be.

I am the endearing combination of broke and cheap, but this is a hardcover book I was happy to pay for, if only because it makes it easier for me to lend it to everyone I know.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0

My New Favorite Book

You guys. This book.

I have to share the original moment I lived while reading this book. I was on the bus, riding home from our field trip to a science museum, sharing a seat with a 6th grade girl who used JUSTIN BIEBER twice as her word in our morning games of Hangman. I was a bawling mess over the book, so these sweeties were trying to comfort me, while also asking me to try on the mustache-shaped mood ring they bought at the gift shop so they could see what color "sad" is. I love being a teacher.

Anyway, back to John Green's masterpiece. If you read young adult literature, you've probably already heard tons about this novel about two star-crossed teenagers who have cancer. I really don't want to give any of the plot away, so I will share how much I loved the main characters, Hazel and Augustus.

Hazel is the type of sixteen year old we all wish we were (without the cancer, obviously). She is wise and funny, beautiful and confident, plus she gets along well with her parents. The novel is almost overwhelmingly sad, but it is Hazel's narration that prevents it from going over the edge. Her sarcastic and honest voice had me laughing through my tears.

Augustus Waters is probably the best YA boyfriend to ever be written. He says gorgeous things like, "You are so busy being you that you have no idea how utterly unprecedented you are." His clever, generous heart is what you wish everyone experiences in a lifetime, even if it is far shorter than it should be.

I am the endearing combination of broke and cheap, but this is a hardcover book I was happy to pay for, if only because it makes it easier for me to lend it to everyone I know.

Was this review helpful to you? 
 

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Average user rating from: 47 user(s)

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Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
4.6  (47)
Characters 
 
4.7  (47)
Writing Style 
 
4.9  (47)
In The Fault In Our Stars by John Green, he builds a story out of darkness and despair. He takes the tragedy of cancer and immerses us in the lives of characters that could very well be real. Many know of the heartaches in dealing with those who fight the fight, and many of those scars last a lifetime. He brings his story in the form of a teen girl, Hazel Lancaster. Stricken with cancer from a young age, she believes she has come to terms with what her life has become. Then she meets a young man, Augustus Waters, a survivor of cancer. He is drawn to her in a way that is initially uncomfortable, and as she tries to push him away in her sarcastic vein, he finds her to be exactly the type of girl he has been looking for. For cancer touches not just the victim but all those who have loved and are in anyway touched by them. One should be prepared for a story of romance, anger, excitement and humor, and friendship and bravery for that is the way we are led as Green develops the personality of a group of teens that have the courage to bring both laughter and tears. Hidden within that strength they also hide the depression and hopelessness as they try hard to protect their family and friends by showing only the smiles and strength whenever possible. The friendships as well as the depths the families go through preparing for the worst while holding out hope is like a beacon of light.
The courage and humor, the energy and sadness all keep you on a roller coaster of emotion. Green takes you on a journey both terrible and beautiful.

Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
WIlly Reviewed by WIlly October 28, 2014
  -   View all my reviews (1)

Amazing book

In The Fault In Our Stars by John Green, he builds a story out of darkness and despair. He takes the tragedy of cancer and immerses us in the lives of characters that could very well be real. Many know of the heartaches in dealing with those who fight the fight, and many of those scars last a lifetime. He brings his story in the form of a teen girl, Hazel Lancaster. Stricken with cancer from a young age, she believes she has come to terms with what her life has become. Then she meets a young man, Augustus Waters, a survivor of cancer. He is drawn to her in a way that is initially uncomfortable, and as she tries to push him away in her sarcastic vein, he finds her to be exactly the type of girl he has been looking for. For cancer touches not just the victim but all those who have loved and are in anyway touched by them. One should be prepared for a story of romance, anger, excitement and humor, and friendship and bravery for that is the way we are led as Green develops the personality of a group of teens that have the courage to bring both laughter and tears. Hidden within that strength they also hide the depression and hopelessness as they try hard to protect their family and friends by showing only the smiles and strength whenever possible. The friendships as well as the depths the families go through preparing for the worst while holding out hope is like a beacon of light.
The courage and humor, the energy and sadness all keep you on a roller coaster of emotion. Green takes you on a journey both terrible and beautiful.

Was this review helpful to you? 
This is one of the best young adult books I've EVER read. "The Fault in Our Stars", by John Green, is such a powerful book, it was like riding a roller coaster, it had a plot, ups and downs, a purpose, i got butterflies, parts were i laughed, cried or screamed.
BEST BOOK EVER.
I also hate the book.
I hate the fact it made me cry so much.
I hate the fact it made me laugh so much.
I hate the fact i loved it so much,
I hate the fact that i can't think like John Green.
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Yasmine Reviewed by Yasmine August 27, 2014
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AMAZBALLS!!

This is one of the best young adult books I've EVER read. "The Fault in Our Stars", by John Green, is such a powerful book, it was like riding a roller coaster, it had a plot, ups and downs, a purpose, i got butterflies, parts were i laughed, cried or screamed.
BEST BOOK EVER.
I also hate the book.
I hate the fact it made me cry so much.
I hate the fact it made me laugh so much.
I hate the fact i loved it so much,
I hate the fact that i can't think like John Green.

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Let me start out by admitting there was no way I could look at this book with the kind of objectivity I normally cling to. Allow me to put my perspective into context:

1.) I'm a registered nurse, and the daughter of registered nurse. I recognize that morbid gallows humor is often an essential coping mechanism for both medical personnel and long-term patients. I'm not squeamish, and I have almost zero gag reflex. I grew up with medical terminology and have no concept of what may or may not be considered appropriate dinner table conversation.

2.) I'm closely familiar with cancer—both in terms of the victors and victims of its various ravaging forms. I've watched it weaken, mutilate, and kill without discrimination for age. And I know how much more intense it can seem when the inflicted is so very young. (Growing up I watched two high school friends and my 32-year-old neighbor battle for their lives.)

3.) My sister has Cystic Fibrosis. She has been living at the hospital for the last 8 months, her life and health in tenuous suspension as she awaits a compatible lung transplant.

So, now that you know a little more about where I'm coming from, I hope you can forgive me for not adoring this book. Not that I went into this expecting to love a Nicholas Sparks-style romantic tragedy with so much medical emphasis. I did hope, though, for the depth of philosophical thought and emotion that so many around me were going on about.

“You'll cry!” they promised. “Oh, the feels!”

I wanted them to be right. But the fact is, I didn't do a lot of feeling. I chuckled now and then, admired a few of the more poetic passages, frowned at nit-picky points of medical description... and in the end, walked away shaking off the mild aftertaste of defeatism.

I'll readily admit my timing might be way off. Or, perhaps, this book wasn't meant for someone like me at all. (As I understand it, it's doing a bang-up job of giving many folks an expanded sense of sympathy for those with cancer. For some, even instilling more awareness of their own mortality. I give it kudos on that front.)

The Fault In Our Stars is well paced, complex, and exceptionally readable. The prose has good flow, the sarcasm is biting, and the wording is clever. While the vocab choices may have slightly overindulged in pulling the cancer-caused profundity card, this reviewer stands firmly in the camp of people who appreciate it when a YA author doesn't talk down to their audience. I also found that John Green's writing style does agree with me enough that I'm now likely to pick up one of his other works.

Yet, at the same time...I never really connected with this particular story. Hazel was a part of my problem, I know. She was dying, and she didn't really seem to have a reason for living (aside from, well, keeping her parents from becoming no-longer-parents.) There was one nagging reason I had trouble finding her believable: her thought processes were such that I would have easily thought she'd ALWAYS been dying, rather than being diagnosed at age 13. In this regard, I found Augustus more multidimensional and, I dare say, likeable. He had the stronger sense of self and purpose. Which I'm sure was by design, but still, it's Hazel's POV we see everything from.

I realize I sound like a horrible, callous person for criticizing the character of a suffering cancer patient—however fictional she may or may not be. (On that note, is there a way of not adoring this book without looking like a complete jerk? >.>)

I presume this is the sort of heavy “issues” book that's supposed to make the reader think. To that end, it succeeded with me. But I spent a great deal of my time thinking on the differences in worldview and mindsets in all the young people I've known who dealt with fatal and potentially fatal illnesses. I also dwelt quite a bit on the differences between those who've been diagnosed with things like cancer and more or less had their futures snatched away from them, and those born with life-long terminal ailments like Cystic Fibrosis who never have a chance to be blissfully ignorant of their own mortality.
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Plot 
 
3.0
Characters 
 
3.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Angela Blount Reviewed by Angela Blount August 26, 2014
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (38)

The Fault Is Probably Mine

Let me start out by admitting there was no way I could look at this book with the kind of objectivity I normally cling to. Allow me to put my perspective into context:

1.) I'm a registered nurse, and the daughter of registered nurse. I recognize that morbid gallows humor is often an essential coping mechanism for both medical personnel and long-term patients. I'm not squeamish, and I have almost zero gag reflex. I grew up with medical terminology and have no concept of what may or may not be considered appropriate dinner table conversation.

2.) I'm closely familiar with cancer—both in terms of the victors and victims of its various ravaging forms. I've watched it weaken, mutilate, and kill without discrimination for age. And I know how much more intense it can seem when the inflicted is so very young. (Growing up I watched two high school friends and my 32-year-old neighbor battle for their lives.)

3.) My sister has Cystic Fibrosis. She has been living at the hospital for the last 8 months, her life and health in tenuous suspension as she awaits a compatible lung transplant.

So, now that you know a little more about where I'm coming from, I hope you can forgive me for not adoring this book. Not that I went into this expecting to love a Nicholas Sparks-style romantic tragedy with so much medical emphasis. I did hope, though, for the depth of philosophical thought and emotion that so many around me were going on about.

“You'll cry!” they promised. “Oh, the feels!”

I wanted them to be right. But the fact is, I didn't do a lot of feeling. I chuckled now and then, admired a few of the more poetic passages, frowned at nit-picky points of medical description... and in the end, walked away shaking off the mild aftertaste of defeatism.

I'll readily admit my timing might be way off. Or, perhaps, this book wasn't meant for someone like me at all. (As I understand it, it's doing a bang-up job of giving many folks an expanded sense of sympathy for those with cancer. For some, even instilling more awareness of their own mortality. I give it kudos on that front.)

The Fault In Our Stars is well paced, complex, and exceptionally readable. The prose has good flow, the sarcasm is biting, and the wording is clever. While the vocab choices may have slightly overindulged in pulling the cancer-caused profundity card, this reviewer stands firmly in the camp of people who appreciate it when a YA author doesn't talk down to their audience. I also found that John Green's writing style does agree with me enough that I'm now likely to pick up one of his other works.

Yet, at the same time...I never really connected with this particular story. Hazel was a part of my problem, I know. She was dying, and she didn't really seem to have a reason for living (aside from, well, keeping her parents from becoming no-longer-parents.) There was one nagging reason I had trouble finding her believable: her thought processes were such that I would have easily thought she'd ALWAYS been dying, rather than being diagnosed at age 13. In this regard, I found Augustus more multidimensional and, I dare say, likeable. He had the stronger sense of self and purpose. Which I'm sure was by design, but still, it's Hazel's POV we see everything from.

I realize I sound like a horrible, callous person for criticizing the character of a suffering cancer patient—however fictional she may or may not be. (On that note, is there a way of not adoring this book without looking like a complete jerk? >.>)

I presume this is the sort of heavy “issues” book that's supposed to make the reader think. To that end, it succeeded with me. But I spent a great deal of my time thinking on the differences in worldview and mindsets in all the young people I've known who dealt with fatal and potentially fatal illnesses. I also dwelt quite a bit on the differences between those who've been diagnosed with things like cancer and more or less had their futures snatched away from them, and those born with life-long terminal ailments like Cystic Fibrosis who never have a chance to be blissfully ignorant of their own mortality.

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This was an absolutely beautiful book. It was actually the first, and one of the only, books to make me sob. It was heartbreaking, and I've read it three times since I got it last November. The characters are beautifully written, and absolutely lovable. I can't say much, as I don't want to give away anything, but if you've not read it, you must do so.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Oswin Holmes Reviewed by Oswin Holmes July 26, 2014
Top 1000 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Beautiful

This was an absolutely beautiful book. It was actually the first, and one of the only, books to make me sob. It was heartbreaking, and I've read it three times since I got it last November. The characters are beautifully written, and absolutely lovable. I can't say much, as I don't want to give away anything, but if you've not read it, you must do so.

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This book.......What can I say this book was amazing. I love the way John Green writes, he is witty, humorous, and he tells it how it is. That's one of the things I like in this book is that he doesn't sugar coat it. I've read many books with the "and they lived happily ever after" and this book is the complete opposite of that. You don't always have the perfect relationship or a perfect life, this book deals with real problems that people go through. I loved the characters and I think they where well written compared to some other books I've read. This book just overwhelms you with so many emotions. Yes it was sad but John Green makes it feel okay and that its not the end. Leaving you more that satisfied by the end of the book. I also really love the chemistry all the characters had with each other and ohh my goodness Augustus Waters!! Augustus he just has this attitude about him that you just cant help but fall for and Hazel, she is just so honest, confident, and strong. Honestly Hazel is like a role model, to have the strength she has and who she is just made this book so much more amazing. I loved this book and have recommended it to all of my friends and I believe it is truly a book worth reading.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Brianna Laseman Reviewed by Brianna Laseman July 01, 2014
  -   View all my reviews (1)

Truly Astonishing

This book.......What can I say this book was amazing. I love the way John Green writes, he is witty, humorous, and he tells it how it is. That's one of the things I like in this book is that he doesn't sugar coat it. I've read many books with the "and they lived happily ever after" and this book is the complete opposite of that. You don't always have the perfect relationship or a perfect life, this book deals with real problems that people go through. I loved the characters and I think they where well written compared to some other books I've read. This book just overwhelms you with so many emotions. Yes it was sad but John Green makes it feel okay and that its not the end. Leaving you more that satisfied by the end of the book. I also really love the chemistry all the characters had with each other and ohh my goodness Augustus Waters!! Augustus he just has this attitude about him that you just cant help but fall for and Hazel, she is just so honest, confident, and strong. Honestly Hazel is like a role model, to have the strength she has and who she is just made this book so much more amazing. I loved this book and have recommended it to all of my friends and I believe it is truly a book worth reading.

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what to say about a book that deals with things that amny people wouldn't write about.
Hazle ia a young girl which we sould all look up to. i dont have much to say but (fangirling here) FEELS!!!!
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
leigh-ann Reviewed by leigh-ann June 19, 2014
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amazing

what to say about a book that deals with things that amny people wouldn't write about.
Hazle ia a young girl which we sould all look up to. i dont have much to say but (fangirling here) FEELS!!!!

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“Pain demands to be felt.”

Hazel Grace Lancaster, a terminal cancer patient (“thyroid originally but with an impressive and long-settled satellite colony in (her) lungs”), who uses an oxygen tank wherever she goes, thinks the only think someone should expect of life is dying. But, after a twist ,named Augustus Walters, whose leg was claimed by a bone tumor , appears on her boring routine , her life with take an unpredictable turn. Hazel (she is the narrator of the story) and Augustus meet at a cancer support group. Thou they are “very different and disagreed about a lot of things,” they always find a way to make their relationship interesting.

John Green create such well crafted characters, and an amazing, never boring plot, it’s inevitable not to love this book.
Loved how Gus (Augustus) loves Hazel even thou he know it’s gong to hurt him sooner or later.

“Hazel Grace…it would be a privilege to have my heart broken by you.”

But not only Gus is suffering (but may not show it) with Hazel’s condition, her parents have to deal with the idea that their only daughter is going to died sooner than they thought. It broke my heart how Hazel’s mom thought she “won’t be a mom any more,” after Hazel dies, which is inevitable. Hazel is “the alpha and omega of (their) suffering.”

The Fault in Our Stars is the best love story written , yet. Romeo and Juliet. Who?
John Green made us fall in love with his characters and the story itself.

“It’s easy enough to win over people you meet. But getting strangers to love you…now that’s the trick.”

And in the process (of falling in love with the characters) “we (the readers) were all wounded in (their) battle.” A courageous battle.
Like Hazel says, “the world is not a wish-granting factory.” but (in my opinion) for Gus and her, it made an exception to give their love a “a little infinity.”

“Some infinities are bigger than other infinities.”

Their love was a piece of “forever within the numbered days.” They enjoyed their time together “on a roller coaster that only goes up.’

Thou the book deals with cancer (tragic and sad), it mixes humor without being cruel.

“He’s not that smart,” I said to Julie.
“She’s right. It’s just the most really good-looking people are stupid, so I exceed expectations.”
“Right, it’s primarily his hotness,” I said.
“It can be sort of blinding,” he said.
“It actually did blind our friend Isaac,” I said.
“Terrible tragedy, that. But can I help my own deadly beauty?”
“You cannot.”
“It is my burden, this beautiful face.”
“Not to mention your body.”
“seriously, don’t even get me started on my hot bod. You don’t want to see me naked, Dave. Seeing me naked actually took Hazel Grace’s breath away,” he said, nodding toward the oxygen tank.

This book teach us “the most important lesson of all: No matter how hard you kick, no matter how high you get, you can’t go all the way around.”
I’m thankful for the “little infinity” Green gave me with this lovely story. Still, “my thoughts (about this book) are stars I can’t fathom into constellations.”
Loved this heart-growing book. My heart feels like it’s full and in any minute is going to explode like a grenade. Or it could be all the crying I went through will reading it and after finishing it. 5 (okay maybe 6 or more) Stars
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Viviana Ortiz Reviewed by Viviana Ortiz June 18, 2014
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (46)

Genius

“Pain demands to be felt.”

Hazel Grace Lancaster, a terminal cancer patient (“thyroid originally but with an impressive and long-settled satellite colony in (her) lungs”), who uses an oxygen tank wherever she goes, thinks the only think someone should expect of life is dying. But, after a twist ,named Augustus Walters, whose leg was claimed by a bone tumor , appears on her boring routine , her life with take an unpredictable turn. Hazel (she is the narrator of the story) and Augustus meet at a cancer support group. Thou they are “very different and disagreed about a lot of things,” they always find a way to make their relationship interesting.

John Green create such well crafted characters, and an amazing, never boring plot, it’s inevitable not to love this book.
Loved how Gus (Augustus) loves Hazel even thou he know it’s gong to hurt him sooner or later.

“Hazel Grace…it would be a privilege to have my heart broken by you.”

But not only Gus is suffering (but may not show it) with Hazel’s condition, her parents have to deal with the idea that their only daughter is going to died sooner than they thought. It broke my heart how Hazel’s mom thought she “won’t be a mom any more,” after Hazel dies, which is inevitable. Hazel is “the alpha and omega of (their) suffering.”

The Fault in Our Stars is the best love story written , yet. Romeo and Juliet. Who?
John Green made us fall in love with his characters and the story itself.

“It’s easy enough to win over people you meet. But getting strangers to love you…now that’s the trick.”

And in the process (of falling in love with the characters) “we (the readers) were all wounded in (their) battle.” A courageous battle.
Like Hazel says, “the world is not a wish-granting factory.” but (in my opinion) for Gus and her, it made an exception to give their love a “a little infinity.”

“Some infinities are bigger than other infinities.”

Their love was a piece of “forever within the numbered days.” They enjoyed their time together “on a roller coaster that only goes up.’

Thou the book deals with cancer (tragic and sad), it mixes humor without being cruel.

“He’s not that smart,” I said to Julie.
“She’s right. It’s just the most really good-looking people are stupid, so I exceed expectations.”
“Right, it’s primarily his hotness,” I said.
“It can be sort of blinding,” he said.
“It actually did blind our friend Isaac,” I said.
“Terrible tragedy, that. But can I help my own deadly beauty?”
“You cannot.”
“It is my burden, this beautiful face.”
“Not to mention your body.”
“seriously, don’t even get me started on my hot bod. You don’t want to see me naked, Dave. Seeing me naked actually took Hazel Grace’s breath away,” he said, nodding toward the oxygen tank.

This book teach us “the most important lesson of all: No matter how hard you kick, no matter how high you get, you can’t go all the way around.”
I’m thankful for the “little infinity” Green gave me with this lovely story. Still, “my thoughts (about this book) are stars I can’t fathom into constellations.”
Loved this heart-growing book. My heart feels like it’s full and in any minute is going to explode like a grenade. Or it could be all the crying I went through will reading it and after finishing it. 5 (okay maybe 6 or more) Stars

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The fault really is in our self. It was this book whom showed us in such a small amount of time we can live a meaningful life. Thank you John Green, Hazel Grace Lancaster, Augustus Waters,Isaac, and everything/everyone else in that entire book.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Sherifa Alabi Reviewed by Sherifa Alabi June 03, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (5)

The Fault In Our selfs

The fault really is in our self. It was this book whom showed us in such a small amount of time we can live a meaningful life. Thank you John Green, Hazel Grace Lancaster, Augustus Waters,Isaac, and everything/everyone else in that entire book.

Was this review helpful to you? 
I've been liking most of his stuff actually
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Luna Kay Reviewed by Luna Kay May 26, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (3)

another good book by john green

I've been liking most of his stuff actually

Was this review helpful to you? 
The Fault In Our Stars by John Green is a beautiful, heart warming book which should be read by every teen out there.

The Characters in the book, you can't help but love them. The fantastic humour between Augustus and Hazel is just a joy to read, and you love being able to be with these two people and be able to see them grow as a couple. The fact they both are victims of cancer, makes the whole thing more special and the way they se life and death is an inspiration. The ideas that you should enjoy the moment and not look at how and when you will cease to be and enjoy the moment when it lasts.

The plot isn't a ground breaking plot, but it is fine to show the special connection between Hazel and Augustus. The way this book has also ben written is a joy to read and the whole read was effortless and it's a book that can be read many times.

Overall, this is a very deep and brilliant book which fantastically explores the boundaries between living and dying and is a joy to read.
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
3.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Joshua Pyne Reviewed by Joshua Pyne February 28, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (6)

The Fault In Our Stars

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green is a beautiful, heart warming book which should be read by every teen out there.

The Characters in the book, you can't help but love them. The fantastic humour between Augustus and Hazel is just a joy to read, and you love being able to be with these two people and be able to see them grow as a couple. The fact they both are victims of cancer, makes the whole thing more special and the way they se life and death is an inspiration. The ideas that you should enjoy the moment and not look at how and when you will cease to be and enjoy the moment when it lasts.

The plot isn't a ground breaking plot, but it is fine to show the special connection between Hazel and Augustus. The way this book has also ben written is a joy to read and the whole read was effortless and it's a book that can be read many times.

Overall, this is a very deep and brilliant book which fantastically explores the boundaries between living and dying and is a joy to read.

Was this review helpful to you? 
 
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