Books Young Adult Fiction The Fault In Our Stars

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4.5 (2)
 
4.8 (38)
4427   18
Author(s)
Age Range
14+
Release Date
January 10, 2012
ISBN
0525478817
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Diagnosed with Stage IV thyroid cancer at 12, Hazel was prepared to die until, at 14, a medical miracle shrunk the tumours in her lungs... for now.

Two years post-miracle, sixteen-year-old Hazel is post-everything else, too; post-high school, post-friends and post-normalcy. And even though she could live for a long time (whatever that means), Hazel lives tethered to an oxygen tank, the tumours tenuously kept at bay with a constant chemical assault.

Enter Augustus Waters. A match made at cancer kid support group, Augustus is gorgeous, in remission, and shockingly to her, interested in Hazel. Being with Augustus is both an unexpected destination and a long-needed journey, pushing Hazel to re-examine how sickness and health, life and death, will define her and the legacy that everyone leaves behind.

Editor reviews

Average editor rating from: 2 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
4.5
Plot 
 
4.5  (2)
Characters 
 
4.5  (2)
Writing Style 
 
4.5  (2)

I spent an entire year mentally preparing myself for The Fault in Our Stars. I read some terrible books, awesome books and your classic "meh" books. And whenever I'd go to decide which book I wanted to read next, I'd glance at The Fault in Our Stars' spine and simply turn my head away. To be completely honest, I don't think I have ever truly went out of my way to avoid a book like this and it's unlike me to do so. I usually tackle things head on, showing no fear, but with this book I had to approach things differently due to its subject matter. But then Jenn from The Bawdy Book Blog threw this in as a review suggestion, because obviously I needed some John Green edumacation. And I'm so happy someone finally pushed me to read this book because it did not disappoint. Well, not exactly...

It's easy to see why John Green has the following he does. There is just something magical in the way he strings his sentences together that I can't help but admire it. It's simple, deep and humorous all at the same time. And the biggest thing I worried about when diving into this book was the sadness. You go into the book knowing the characters are terminal and I didn't know how I would fair connecting with a character, loving a character, to ultimately have them suffer and die. I'm a really easy crier and I don't like seeing people (fictional or real) suffer. But somehow John Green manages to take a cancer book and fill it with the sweetest memories.

For a good portion of The Fault in Our Stars, I found myself chuckling at Hazel and Augustus' dry humor. The first half was generally light-hearted despite the grim situation the characters were in. Even when things got more serious, the humor was subtly there as a convenient ice-breaker of sorts. If I could describe it, I'd liken it to a grandparent making a joke about their impending death. It's awkward and uncomfortable, but oddly reassuring that it's possible to joke about something so morbid. Life goes on.

The plot was simply "ok" for me, never wowing me or keeping me on the edge of my seat. It, at times, seemed to just float by with occasional things happening. There weren't many plot twists or "ah ha!" moments because you could tell from the beginning how it would end. You knew from the subject matter that it would be sad, and yet... I did not really cry. I did shed The Lonely Tear, but it wasn't for the characters. It was because of the situation they were in. It was because cancer sucks. Don't get me wrong, this is a beautifully written book, but the problem I ran into was the questionable authenticity of the protagonists. They never felt like teenagers. I get that they were intelligent and spent a lot more time contemplating life than your average teen, but they never felt real to me. Now, I'm not exactly a stranger to John Green himself. I religiously watch his history webshow on Youtube and I'm often amazed at this guy. But it was like he sat down and created mini-Despicable-Me-minon-like John Greens for this novel. They are all witty, super intelligent and too pretentious for their own good.

Further, it was almost like Green relied on the severity of the ending and the character's intelligence to jar emotion from the reader. Clearly, this worked since two weeks after finishing, I cried while making pancakes just from thinking about Augustus' letter to Hazel. But again, this was not for the characters. It wasn't remotely similar or as powerful of an emotion that I'd felt after I read A Walk to Remember where I cried in my 8th grade English class under my desk. I'm talking about complete and utter sorrow for Landon and everyone else. DON'T JUDGE ME. :P

Anyway, while I remain conflicted on how I feel about the characters, it doesn't negate the fact that this is a fabulous, smart read that I'd recommend to others.
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0

Beautifully Written

I spent an entire year mentally preparing myself for The Fault in Our Stars. I read some terrible books, awesome books and your classic "meh" books. And whenever I'd go to decide which book I wanted to read next, I'd glance at The Fault in Our Stars' spine and simply turn my head away. To be completely honest, I don't think I have ever truly went out of my way to avoid a book like this and it's unlike me to do so. I usually tackle things head on, showing no fear, but with this book I had to approach things differently due to its subject matter. But then Jenn from The Bawdy Book Blog threw this in as a review suggestion, because obviously I needed some John Green edumacation. And I'm so happy someone finally pushed me to read this book because it did not disappoint. Well, not exactly...

It's easy to see why John Green has the following he does. There is just something magical in the way he strings his sentences together that I can't help but admire it. It's simple, deep and humorous all at the same time. And the biggest thing I worried about when diving into this book was the sadness. You go into the book knowing the characters are terminal and I didn't know how I would fair connecting with a character, loving a character, to ultimately have them suffer and die. I'm a really easy crier and I don't like seeing people (fictional or real) suffer. But somehow John Green manages to take a cancer book and fill it with the sweetest memories.

For a good portion of The Fault in Our Stars, I found myself chuckling at Hazel and Augustus' dry humor. The first half was generally light-hearted despite the grim situation the characters were in. Even when things got more serious, the humor was subtly there as a convenient ice-breaker of sorts. If I could describe it, I'd liken it to a grandparent making a joke about their impending death. It's awkward and uncomfortable, but oddly reassuring that it's possible to joke about something so morbid. Life goes on.

The plot was simply "ok" for me, never wowing me or keeping me on the edge of my seat. It, at times, seemed to just float by with occasional things happening. There weren't many plot twists or "ah ha!" moments because you could tell from the beginning how it would end. You knew from the subject matter that it would be sad, and yet... I did not really cry. I did shed The Lonely Tear, but it wasn't for the characters. It was because of the situation they were in. It was because cancer sucks. Don't get me wrong, this is a beautifully written book, but the problem I ran into was the questionable authenticity of the protagonists. They never felt like teenagers. I get that they were intelligent and spent a lot more time contemplating life than your average teen, but they never felt real to me. Now, I'm not exactly a stranger to John Green himself. I religiously watch his history webshow on Youtube and I'm often amazed at this guy. But it was like he sat down and created mini-Despicable-Me-minon-like John Greens for this novel. They are all witty, super intelligent and too pretentious for their own good.

Further, it was almost like Green relied on the severity of the ending and the character's intelligence to jar emotion from the reader. Clearly, this worked since two weeks after finishing, I cried while making pancakes just from thinking about Augustus' letter to Hazel. But again, this was not for the characters. It wasn't remotely similar or as powerful of an emotion that I'd felt after I read A Walk to Remember where I cried in my 8th grade English class under my desk. I'm talking about complete and utter sorrow for Landon and everyone else. DON'T JUDGE ME. :P

Anyway, while I remain conflicted on how I feel about the characters, it doesn't negate the fact that this is a fabulous, smart read that I'd recommend to others.

Was this review helpful to you? 
You guys. This book.

I have to share the original moment I lived while reading this book. I was on the bus, riding home from our field trip to a science museum, sharing a seat with a 6th grade girl who used JUSTIN BIEBER twice as her word in our morning games of Hangman. I was a bawling mess over the book, so these sweeties were trying to comfort me, while also asking me to try on the mustache-shaped mood ring they bought at the gift shop so they could see what color "sad" is. I love being a teacher.

Anyway, back to John Green's masterpiece. If you read young adult literature, you've probably already heard tons about this novel about two star-crossed teenagers who have cancer. I really don't want to give any of the plot away, so I will share how much I loved the main characters, Hazel and Augustus.

Hazel is the type of sixteen year old we all wish we were (without the cancer, obviously). She is wise and funny, beautiful and confident, plus she gets along well with her parents. The novel is almost overwhelmingly sad, but it is Hazel's narration that prevents it from going over the edge. Her sarcastic and honest voice had me laughing through my tears.

Augustus Waters is probably the best YA boyfriend to ever be written. He says gorgeous things like, "You are so busy being you that you have no idea how utterly unprecedented you are." His clever, generous heart is what you wish everyone experiences in a lifetime, even if it is far shorter than it should be.

I am the endearing combination of broke and cheap, but this is a hardcover book I was happy to pay for, if only because it makes it easier for me to lend it to everyone I know.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0

My New Favorite Book

You guys. This book.

I have to share the original moment I lived while reading this book. I was on the bus, riding home from our field trip to a science museum, sharing a seat with a 6th grade girl who used JUSTIN BIEBER twice as her word in our morning games of Hangman. I was a bawling mess over the book, so these sweeties were trying to comfort me, while also asking me to try on the mustache-shaped mood ring they bought at the gift shop so they could see what color "sad" is. I love being a teacher.

Anyway, back to John Green's masterpiece. If you read young adult literature, you've probably already heard tons about this novel about two star-crossed teenagers who have cancer. I really don't want to give any of the plot away, so I will share how much I loved the main characters, Hazel and Augustus.

Hazel is the type of sixteen year old we all wish we were (without the cancer, obviously). She is wise and funny, beautiful and confident, plus she gets along well with her parents. The novel is almost overwhelmingly sad, but it is Hazel's narration that prevents it from going over the edge. Her sarcastic and honest voice had me laughing through my tears.

Augustus Waters is probably the best YA boyfriend to ever be written. He says gorgeous things like, "You are so busy being you that you have no idea how utterly unprecedented you are." His clever, generous heart is what you wish everyone experiences in a lifetime, even if it is far shorter than it should be.

I am the endearing combination of broke and cheap, but this is a hardcover book I was happy to pay for, if only because it makes it easier for me to lend it to everyone I know.

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Average user rating from: 38 user(s)

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Overall rating 
 
4.8
Plot 
 
4.6  (38)
Characters 
 
4.8  (38)
Writing Style 
 
4.9  (38)
The Fault In Our Stars by John Green is a beautiful, heart warming book which should be read by every teen out there.

The Characters in the book, you can't help but love them. The fantastic humour between Augustus and Hazel is just a joy to read, and you love being able to be with these two people and be able to see them grow as a couple. The fact they both are victims of cancer, makes the whole thing more special and the way they se life and death is an inspiration. The ideas that you should enjoy the moment and not look at how and when you will cease to be and enjoy the moment when it lasts.

The plot isn't a ground breaking plot, but it is fine to show the special connection between Hazel and Augustus. The way this book has also ben written is a joy to read and the whole read was effortless and it's a book that can be read many times.

Overall, this is a very deep and brilliant book which fantastically explores the boundaries between living and dying and is a joy to read.
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
3.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Joshua Pyne Reviewed by Joshua Pyne February 28, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (4)

The Fault In Our Stars

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green is a beautiful, heart warming book which should be read by every teen out there.

The Characters in the book, you can't help but love them. The fantastic humour between Augustus and Hazel is just a joy to read, and you love being able to be with these two people and be able to see them grow as a couple. The fact they both are victims of cancer, makes the whole thing more special and the way they se life and death is an inspiration. The ideas that you should enjoy the moment and not look at how and when you will cease to be and enjoy the moment when it lasts.

The plot isn't a ground breaking plot, but it is fine to show the special connection between Hazel and Augustus. The way this book has also ben written is a joy to read and the whole read was effortless and it's a book that can be read many times.

Overall, this is a very deep and brilliant book which fantastically explores the boundaries between living and dying and is a joy to read.

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If I told you what this book was about and the genre you would think I was out of my mind to give it 5 stars. But seriously, I couldn't put it down, it is sarcastic and funny and I think everyone should read it.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Louise Cosgrave Reviewed by Louise Cosgrave February 20, 2014
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (25)

Brilliant

If I told you what this book was about and the genre you would think I was out of my mind to give it 5 stars. But seriously, I couldn't put it down, it is sarcastic and funny and I think everyone should read it.

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The Fault in Our Stars tells the story of Hazel a sixteen year old who survived lung cancer but still is affected by it physically - she has breathing difficulties. Hazel separates herself from the things she did before she had cancer and thus leaving her isolated from the world apart from her (useless) friend. Her mother pushes/forces her to go to a cancer support group (because she spends her time rereading the same book over and over again and because she maybe depressed) and that is where she meets Gus.

I knew from the interactions and the dialogue between Hazel and Gus that their romance was going to be awesome. Even though a lot of people are saying that they speak like 60 year old's or whatever but the way they spoke (I think personally) is like they thought about every word and the impact of it. There was something unique about them, it was like there was meanings to even the simplest words. Even though Hazel tries to push Gus away because she's afraid for herself and for him Gus still breaks through Hazel's walls and they have the shortest and sweetest relationship.

Gus is so sweet, like personally I would never share my wish with anybody and he gives his away to a girl he barely knows. Must be love. What he does to get Hazel to meet her favourite author is just like - flying all the way to Amsterdam - he even writes letters to the author's assistant and his charm made him the only one to get a reply. He took the risk of falling in love even though he knew he would get his heart broken following his past experiences with his ex and his cancer. And when he broke down he called Hazel first, he trusted her.

Okay. What a romantic word. It's like one of the simplest words ever with multiple meanings to it. Using Okay shows that even the most simple things can hold the deepest memories.

Like 99% of the reader I did cry like I promised myself I wouldn't.
I cried when Gus told Hazel and Isaac to read their eulogies. How Gus got through that I have no clue.
I cried when Gus's cancer came back and how it affected him.
I cried when Gus died and Hazel was an emotional wreck.

But - I did smile when Isaac threw eggs at his ex's car with Hazel and Gus cheering him on.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Aisha Ali Reviewed by Aisha Ali February 16, 2014
  -   View all my reviews (1)

The Fault in Our Stars

The Fault in Our Stars tells the story of Hazel a sixteen year old who survived lung cancer but still is affected by it physically - she has breathing difficulties. Hazel separates herself from the things she did before she had cancer and thus leaving her isolated from the world apart from her (useless) friend. Her mother pushes/forces her to go to a cancer support group (because she spends her time rereading the same book over and over again and because she maybe depressed) and that is where she meets Gus.

I knew from the interactions and the dialogue between Hazel and Gus that their romance was going to be awesome. Even though a lot of people are saying that they speak like 60 year old's or whatever but the way they spoke (I think personally) is like they thought about every word and the impact of it. There was something unique about them, it was like there was meanings to even the simplest words. Even though Hazel tries to push Gus away because she's afraid for herself and for him Gus still breaks through Hazel's walls and they have the shortest and sweetest relationship.

Gus is so sweet, like personally I would never share my wish with anybody and he gives his away to a girl he barely knows. Must be love. What he does to get Hazel to meet her favourite author is just like - flying all the way to Amsterdam - he even writes letters to the author's assistant and his charm made him the only one to get a reply. He took the risk of falling in love even though he knew he would get his heart broken following his past experiences with his ex and his cancer. And when he broke down he called Hazel first, he trusted her.

Okay. What a romantic word. It's like one of the simplest words ever with multiple meanings to it. Using Okay shows that even the most simple things can hold the deepest memories.

Like 99% of the reader I did cry like I promised myself I wouldn't.
I cried when Gus told Hazel and Isaac to read their eulogies. How Gus got through that I have no clue.
I cried when Gus's cancer came back and how it affected him.
I cried when Gus died and Hazel was an emotional wreck.

But - I did smile when Isaac threw eggs at his ex's car with Hazel and Gus cheering him on.

Was this review helpful to you? 
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is an impelling novel narrated by a sixteen year-old lung cancer patient, Hazel Grace Lancaster. The book is about the misfortunes she will be facing while on a trip to Amsterdam with her boyfriend Augustus Waters, who has amputated his right leg due to bone cancer, and is in remission. Hazel and Augustus then travel to Amsterdam to search for Peter Van Houten, the author of their favorite book, An Imperial Affliction. While returning from the trip Augustus reveals some bitter news to Hazel, which drives the story plot to a turning point.
I genuinely liked the sassy narration of this story. Unfortunately as the strength of the book, it also was a weakness: there were times when Hazel and Augustus sounded smarter and savvier than any sixteen-year-old I’ve ever met; even the other characters sometimes shared this abnormal cleverness. As much as I liked Hazel and Augustus, and found them ravishing, I also felt that I could see the author’s shadow in these characters. “It does not taste like God himself cooked heaven into a series of five dishes which were served to you accompanied by several luminous balls fermented, bubbly plasma while actual and literal flower petals floated down all around your canal-side dinner table.” It was constantly in a metaphorically significant action and words, to the extent of being pretentious. There was a certain ingenuity within this narrative, its ironies and references to other cancer books, as well as its sarcastic puns.
Despite its humor and cheekiness, The Fault in Our Stars is definitely a tale of star-crossed lovers, and will surely bring you to a wailing end.
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Plot 
 
3.0
Characters 
 
3.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Areta Reviewed by Areta December 26, 2013
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Achingly Beautiful

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is an impelling novel narrated by a sixteen year-old lung cancer patient, Hazel Grace Lancaster. The book is about the misfortunes she will be facing while on a trip to Amsterdam with her boyfriend Augustus Waters, who has amputated his right leg due to bone cancer, and is in remission. Hazel and Augustus then travel to Amsterdam to search for Peter Van Houten, the author of their favorite book, An Imperial Affliction. While returning from the trip Augustus reveals some bitter news to Hazel, which drives the story plot to a turning point.
I genuinely liked the sassy narration of this story. Unfortunately as the strength of the book, it also was a weakness: there were times when Hazel and Augustus sounded smarter and savvier than any sixteen-year-old I’ve ever met; even the other characters sometimes shared this abnormal cleverness. As much as I liked Hazel and Augustus, and found them ravishing, I also felt that I could see the author’s shadow in these characters. “It does not taste like God himself cooked heaven into a series of five dishes which were served to you accompanied by several luminous balls fermented, bubbly plasma while actual and literal flower petals floated down all around your canal-side dinner table.” It was constantly in a metaphorically significant action and words, to the extent of being pretentious. There was a certain ingenuity within this narrative, its ironies and references to other cancer books, as well as its sarcastic puns.
Despite its humor and cheekiness, The Fault in Our Stars is definitely a tale of star-crossed lovers, and will surely bring you to a wailing end.

Was this review helpful to you? 
What a great book.

I am glad that this was picked for a book club as otherwise I would not have read it - sometimes you can't help but judge a book by its cover and this one is awful.

I laughed and cried my way through this book, and came out a different person at the end.

The characters are well developed and so so real. You can feel their pain, picture them perfectly. My heart was breaking throughout this whole book. You get so involved with the characters. You can't help it. There is no way you can read this and keep yourself separate from all that's going on.

Although some part of me expected the ending, it still shattered me. Great big gasping sobs, tears rolling down my face, the lot.

This book left me an emotional wreck.

Even months on, I think of this book. I imagine the petals falling down on Amsterdam, I imagine the basement with the video games. I cannot get this book out of my head.
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Cora Linn Reviewed by Cora Linn December 15, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (2)

Left an Emotional Wreck...

What a great book.

I am glad that this was picked for a book club as otherwise I would not have read it - sometimes you can't help but judge a book by its cover and this one is awful.

I laughed and cried my way through this book, and came out a different person at the end.

The characters are well developed and so so real. You can feel their pain, picture them perfectly. My heart was breaking throughout this whole book. You get so involved with the characters. You can't help it. There is no way you can read this and keep yourself separate from all that's going on.

Although some part of me expected the ending, it still shattered me. Great big gasping sobs, tears rolling down my face, the lot.

This book left me an emotional wreck.

Even months on, I think of this book. I imagine the petals falling down on Amsterdam, I imagine the basement with the video games. I cannot get this book out of my head.

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What can I say.......I have read many book so it's hard for me to say I have a favorite book but The Fault In Our Stars is just amazing. This book is extremely touching and I warn you get your tissues! Augustus and Hazel were such beautifully written characters and they are so deep! John Green truly has a gift and he breaks the stereotype that most people think of when they see young adult literature. I absolutely love this book and will continue to happily read it over and over again!
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
dee Reviewed by dee September 09, 2013
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Words Can't Describe.......

What can I say.......I have read many book so it's hard for me to say I have a favorite book but The Fault In Our Stars is just amazing. This book is extremely touching and I warn you get your tissues! Augustus and Hazel were such beautifully written characters and they are so deep! John Green truly has a gift and he breaks the stereotype that most people think of when they see young adult literature. I absolutely love this book and will continue to happily read it over and over again!

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It's all pretty much summed up in "good points".
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Olivia Mollett Reviewed by Olivia Mollett August 18, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (3)

The Fault In Our Stars

It's all pretty much summed up in "good points".

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I loved this book. I loved the characters and I loved the way they interacted with each other, there was just so much to like about it. I felt like Hazel was a genuine, albeit pretentious, 16 year old girl was trying to live life with terminal lung cancer. However many years that might have been. Things changed when she met Augustus Waters, a cancer survivor, and despite her judgement, decides to get to know him.

Hazel knew that the process of getting emotionally involved with Augustus was an irreversible one and in the end someone would get hurt. This book is sad, but I didn’t cry. The ending was in some way expected and also surprising but I felt like from the start we were being prepared for what was to come. Hazel doesn’t take any sugar-coating from anyone and always demands honesty, not pity. She accepts her condition and wants to die, hurting as few people as possible.

This is easier said than done, of course, and Hazel realises that her efforts are futile and she must live for the day because the next isn’t guaranteed. The Fault in Our Stars wasn’t what I expected it to be. There's love, loss and so much pain but I didn’t feel it was about a girl with cancer. It was a teenage girl who fell in love, read a book and some made friends – she just happened to also have cancer.

- See more at: http://im-booked.blogspot.co.uk/
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Lettora Reviewed by Lettora August 08, 2013
Last updated: August 08, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (2)

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

I loved this book. I loved the characters and I loved the way they interacted with each other, there was just so much to like about it. I felt like Hazel was a genuine, albeit pretentious, 16 year old girl was trying to live life with terminal lung cancer. However many years that might have been. Things changed when she met Augustus Waters, a cancer survivor, and despite her judgement, decides to get to know him.

Hazel knew that the process of getting emotionally involved with Augustus was an irreversible one and in the end someone would get hurt. This book is sad, but I didn’t cry. The ending was in some way expected and also surprising but I felt like from the start we were being prepared for what was to come. Hazel doesn’t take any sugar-coating from anyone and always demands honesty, not pity. She accepts her condition and wants to die, hurting as few people as possible.

This is easier said than done, of course, and Hazel realises that her efforts are futile and she must live for the day because the next isn’t guaranteed. The Fault in Our Stars wasn’t what I expected it to be. There's love, loss and so much pain but I didn’t feel it was about a girl with cancer. It was a teenage girl who fell in love, read a book and some made friends – she just happened to also have cancer.

- See more at: http://im-booked.blogspot.co.uk/

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Can't help but love this book, not excited about the soon to be adaptation.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Duks Castro Reviewed by Duks Castro August 03, 2013
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My feels...

Can't help but love this book, not excited about the soon to be adaptation.

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There are so many things I want to say and so many feelings bursting in my chest, and yet I have no words. There are so many reviews out there that express my thoughts better than I ever could, so please bear with me.

The Good

This is not a cancer book. It is the story of two people who have cancer, but it is not a book about two kids who have Cancer with a capital "C". Okay, that's confusing. Let me try again. It's about the people (Hazel and Augustus and Isaac, and, to an extent, everyone else in the "Literal Heart of Jesus") and who they are and how they see the world and life and death and themselves and each other. It's not just about the circumstances they are living in.

Author John Green doesn't pity the characters or pussyfoot around the hard topics, of which there are many (dying, afterlife, sex, cancer, etc). He isn't afraid to make it hurt, and he isn't afraid to be a touch insensitive, at least to the sensitivities of those who so often cringe when topics and people are treated with anything other than kid gloves. I think that was what I loved best about Hazel and Augustus—they said what they thought in the way that best suited them. It wasn't that they didn't have a filter; it was simply that they said things as they felt them. Life's too short to censure. It was like Hazel repeatedly argued; they weren't braver or stronger just because they were "cancer kids", they simply were living regardless of the circumstances.

I was completely in awe of John's craft and his unbelievably strong-yet-fiercely-real characters. The way Augustus and Hazel consider their identities and their mortality and the purpose of existence and love was so heartfelt and fresh and unlike anything I'd ever heard before. So many times, I had to stop, completely in awe at the wonder of it; at the knowledge that somewhere out there, someone — John Green — is thinking this profound ideas without the prompting or guiding hand of an author or a tell-them-like-it-is narrator.

The Bad

Did I mention the open weeping in my office? Really, I couldn't find a flaw in this book if I tried. I can't even wish Augustus and Hazel and Isaac health because it would destroy the greatness of this work and diminish the impact it had on me and countless other readers.

The Bold and the Beautiful

I listened to the audiobook of The Fault in Our Stars, so I didn't get to highlight all of my favorite moments, but here are some I managed to jot down:

“As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.”

“Thank you for explaining that my eye cancer isn't going to make me deaf. I feel so fortunate that an intellectual giant like yourself would deign to operate on me.”

“It's hard as hell to hold on to your dignity when the risen sun is too bright in your losing eyes."

“What a slut time is. She screws everybody.”

"You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world, old man, but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices. I hope she likes hers."

The Grade

5.0 / 5.0

I highly recommend that if you have not yet read The Fault in Our Stars, you do so at once. Better yet, listen to the audiobook. I typically read quickly to discover what happens, and listening to the book really made me focus in on the words themselves, and the experience was one of the best literary moments of my life. No exaggeration.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Whitley Abell Reviewed by Whitley Abell August 01, 2013
Last updated: August 01, 2013
Top 1000 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Absolutely breathtaking

There are so many things I want to say and so many feelings bursting in my chest, and yet I have no words. There are so many reviews out there that express my thoughts better than I ever could, so please bear with me.

The Good

This is not a cancer book. It is the story of two people who have cancer, but it is not a book about two kids who have Cancer with a capital "C". Okay, that's confusing. Let me try again. It's about the people (Hazel and Augustus and Isaac, and, to an extent, everyone else in the "Literal Heart of Jesus") and who they are and how they see the world and life and death and themselves and each other. It's not just about the circumstances they are living in.

Author John Green doesn't pity the characters or pussyfoot around the hard topics, of which there are many (dying, afterlife, sex, cancer, etc). He isn't afraid to make it hurt, and he isn't afraid to be a touch insensitive, at least to the sensitivities of those who so often cringe when topics and people are treated with anything other than kid gloves. I think that was what I loved best about Hazel and Augustus—they said what they thought in the way that best suited them. It wasn't that they didn't have a filter; it was simply that they said things as they felt them. Life's too short to censure. It was like Hazel repeatedly argued; they weren't braver or stronger just because they were "cancer kids", they simply were living regardless of the circumstances.

I was completely in awe of John's craft and his unbelievably strong-yet-fiercely-real characters. The way Augustus and Hazel consider their identities and their mortality and the purpose of existence and love was so heartfelt and fresh and unlike anything I'd ever heard before. So many times, I had to stop, completely in awe at the wonder of it; at the knowledge that somewhere out there, someone — John Green — is thinking this profound ideas without the prompting or guiding hand of an author or a tell-them-like-it-is narrator.

The Bad

Did I mention the open weeping in my office? Really, I couldn't find a flaw in this book if I tried. I can't even wish Augustus and Hazel and Isaac health because it would destroy the greatness of this work and diminish the impact it had on me and countless other readers.

The Bold and the Beautiful

I listened to the audiobook of The Fault in Our Stars, so I didn't get to highlight all of my favorite moments, but here are some I managed to jot down:

“As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.”

“Thank you for explaining that my eye cancer isn't going to make me deaf. I feel so fortunate that an intellectual giant like yourself would deign to operate on me.”

“It's hard as hell to hold on to your dignity when the risen sun is too bright in your losing eyes."

“What a slut time is. She screws everybody.”

"You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world, old man, but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices. I hope she likes hers."

The Grade

5.0 / 5.0

I highly recommend that if you have not yet read The Fault in Our Stars, you do so at once. Better yet, listen to the audiobook. I typically read quickly to discover what happens, and listening to the book really made me focus in on the words themselves, and the experience was one of the best literary moments of my life. No exaggeration.

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