Books Young Adult Fiction Cinder (Lunar Chronicles #1)

Cinder (Lunar Chronicles #1)

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4.0 (2)
 
4.6 (34)
1912   11
Author(s)
Genre(s)
Age Range
12+
Release Date
January 03, 2012
ISBN
978-0312641894
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Humans and androids crowd the raucous streets of New Beijing. A deadly plague ravages the population. From space, a ruthless Lunar people watch, waiting to make their move. No one knows that Earth’s fate hinges on one girl. . . .

Cinder, a gifted mechanic, is a cyborg. She’s a second-class citizen with a mysterious past, reviled by her stepmother and blamed for her stepsister’s illness. But when her life becomes intertwined with the handsome Prince Kai’s, she suddenly finds herself at the center of an intergalactic struggle, and a forbidden attraction. Caught between duty and freedom, loyalty and betrayal, she must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect her world’s future. In this thrilling debut young adult novel, the first of a quartet, Marissa Meyer introduces readers to an unforgettable heroine and a masterfully crafted new world that’s enthralling.

Editor reviews

Average editor rating from: 2 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0  (2)
Characters 
 
4.0  (2)
Writing Style 
 
4.0  (2)

First, I just want to say how much I love the idea of this series. Each book in the futuristic sci-fi Lunar Chronicles is a retelling of a classic fairy tale, and I think that combo is magical. Cinder, obviously, is Cinderella. The sequel, Scarlet, is Little Red Riding Hood. And still to come are Cress (Rapunzel) and Winter (Snow White). Each book will continue the tales of the characters from the prior book while introducing us to new re-imaginings of the fairy tale characters, and while I have no idea how Marissa Meyer is going to pull that off, I'm thrilled about the concept.

Now, talking about the book itself, Cinder was a fun protagonist. She was Cinderella meets Kaylee from Firefly, with robot parts. And I liked that although, like the fairy tale, Cinder's romance with the Prince was definitely part of the story, her main motivation was not love, it was independence. Cinder was prepared to pull herself up by her mechanical bootstraps, and I appreciated that about her.

Prince Kai wasn't the most fleshed out of characters, although I liked him well enough. No, I didn't fully understand what made him so very appealing to Cinder, but he wasn't unappealing. I just didn't quite love him. But that's okay, since as I said, the love story was not actually central to the plot. I'm okay warming up to Kai over several books while I stay invested in the rest of the plot. Even Cinder ends the book not entirely sure about how she feels about him, so it's all right for me to feel the same way.

I really enjoyed the way the fairy tale elements were woven into the story. There's still an evil stepmother, and an evil stepsister. There's a prince, and a ball. And there is the classic running-away-down-the-steps scene, although with a twist.

But at the same time, there's an evil queen who rules a race of people who live on the moon, with mind control powers. There's political unrest. There's a mysterious plague. There's androids and hovers and cyborgs. So while it is recognizable as the fairy tale that inspired it, it also brings a lot of freshness and imagination that makes it stand out from the crowd.

I will say it's a bit predictable. I called the big "twist" ending somewhere in the first 50 pages. But it didn't lessen my enjoyment of the book. I still loved to see how everything unfolded. The thing with fairy tale retellings is that we already know all the bones of the story, so I don't think a surprise ending is all that important. What matters is the creativity of how the tale is told, and how it differs from the original. The characters and setting and how they can hold my interest, even if I know (more or less) what's coming. And I think Cinder accomplished that in spades.

If you are looking for a fun, imaginative new series that puts an exciting sci-fi twist on the stories you grew up with, I'd highly recommend Cinder.
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Lauren Thoman, Editor Reviewed by Lauren Thoman, Editor January 07, 2014
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (69)

Fun and imaginative sci-fi Cinderella

First, I just want to say how much I love the idea of this series. Each book in the futuristic sci-fi Lunar Chronicles is a retelling of a classic fairy tale, and I think that combo is magical. Cinder, obviously, is Cinderella. The sequel, Scarlet, is Little Red Riding Hood. And still to come are Cress (Rapunzel) and Winter (Snow White). Each book will continue the tales of the characters from the prior book while introducing us to new re-imaginings of the fairy tale characters, and while I have no idea how Marissa Meyer is going to pull that off, I'm thrilled about the concept.

Now, talking about the book itself, Cinder was a fun protagonist. She was Cinderella meets Kaylee from Firefly, with robot parts. And I liked that although, like the fairy tale, Cinder's romance with the Prince was definitely part of the story, her main motivation was not love, it was independence. Cinder was prepared to pull herself up by her mechanical bootstraps, and I appreciated that about her.

Prince Kai wasn't the most fleshed out of characters, although I liked him well enough. No, I didn't fully understand what made him so very appealing to Cinder, but he wasn't unappealing. I just didn't quite love him. But that's okay, since as I said, the love story was not actually central to the plot. I'm okay warming up to Kai over several books while I stay invested in the rest of the plot. Even Cinder ends the book not entirely sure about how she feels about him, so it's all right for me to feel the same way.

I really enjoyed the way the fairy tale elements were woven into the story. There's still an evil stepmother, and an evil stepsister. There's a prince, and a ball. And there is the classic running-away-down-the-steps scene, although with a twist.

But at the same time, there's an evil queen who rules a race of people who live on the moon, with mind control powers. There's political unrest. There's a mysterious plague. There's androids and hovers and cyborgs. So while it is recognizable as the fairy tale that inspired it, it also brings a lot of freshness and imagination that makes it stand out from the crowd.

I will say it's a bit predictable. I called the big "twist" ending somewhere in the first 50 pages. But it didn't lessen my enjoyment of the book. I still loved to see how everything unfolded. The thing with fairy tale retellings is that we already know all the bones of the story, so I don't think a surprise ending is all that important. What matters is the creativity of how the tale is told, and how it differs from the original. The characters and setting and how they can hold my interest, even if I know (more or less) what's coming. And I think Cinder accomplished that in spades.

If you are looking for a fun, imaginative new series that puts an exciting sci-fi twist on the stories you grew up with, I'd highly recommend Cinder.

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After first hearing about this book from our school media specialists, I was intrigued. I had just finished The Grimm Legacy by Polly Shulman and Tales Dark and Grimm by Adam Gidwitz and was looking for another "Fairy Tale" genre book. Cinder's plot line in parts is predictable,which allows the reader to make connections tonth characters. Cinder, cyborg and master mechanic, is a strong minded Cinderella. She has her evil stepmother, her legal guardian, and stepsisters.

However, Marissa Meyer adds her own twists. There are threats of plague haunting New Bejing and hundreds of people are dying. People are celebrating over a hundred years of peace after World War IV while trying to keep peace negotiations going with the ruler of Luna(the moon).

This book combines the romantic elements of the classic Cinderella tale, with the science fiction of Star Wars, and maybe a little bit of deception. It is a book I would recommend to all my middle school students, male and female alike. There is a little bit for everyone. A great read that keeps you on the edge of your seat.
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Joanne, Editor Reviewed by Joanne, Editor March 19, 2012
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (93)

Superlunary Cinderella

After first hearing about this book from our school media specialists, I was intrigued. I had just finished The Grimm Legacy by Polly Shulman and Tales Dark and Grimm by Adam Gidwitz and was looking for another "Fairy Tale" genre book. Cinder's plot line in parts is predictable,which allows the reader to make connections tonth characters. Cinder, cyborg and master mechanic, is a strong minded Cinderella. She has her evil stepmother, her legal guardian, and stepsisters.

However, Marissa Meyer adds her own twists. There are threats of plague haunting New Bejing and hundreds of people are dying. People are celebrating over a hundred years of peace after World War IV while trying to keep peace negotiations going with the ruler of Luna(the moon).

This book combines the romantic elements of the classic Cinderella tale, with the science fiction of Star Wars, and maybe a little bit of deception. It is a book I would recommend to all my middle school students, male and female alike. There is a little bit for everyone. A great read that keeps you on the edge of your seat.

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Overall rating 
 
4.6
Plot 
 
4.6  (34)
Characters 
 
4.6  (34)
Writing Style 
 
4.6  (34)
Cyborg Cinderella set in a futuristic Asian society dealing with a ravaging plague and freaky moon people with their sociopathic queen. Cinder is mostly cyborg, and in her world, that's not a cool, awesome thing. Cyborgs are heavily discriminated against and considered second class citizens. Or maybe they're even lower than that. Cinder actually belongs to her evil stepmother, and since she's a cyborg, she's in danger of being pulled to be a guinea pig for the cure to the plague. Note: the cure has not been found yet, which means a lot of dead/dying cyborgs. Cinder's skill with machines grants her the title of being one of the best mechanics in the city, which means that when the crown prince's favorite robot malfunctions, he turns to her for help.

With the mystery of a missing moon princess thrown into the mix, Cinder is absolutely one of the most interesting and captivating retellings of the Cinderella story that I have ever gotten my hands on. It's got action, romance (put not really insta-love), clever dialogue and great characters. The plot is solid and deviates from the regular Cinderella story enough to make it extra interesting. Seriously, when I finished it, I was rabid about getting my hands on its sequel, Scarlet.
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Amber McKinney Reviewed by Amber McKinney December 11, 2013
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (51)

Cyborg Cinderella = Awesome

Cyborg Cinderella set in a futuristic Asian society dealing with a ravaging plague and freaky moon people with their sociopathic queen. Cinder is mostly cyborg, and in her world, that's not a cool, awesome thing. Cyborgs are heavily discriminated against and considered second class citizens. Or maybe they're even lower than that. Cinder actually belongs to her evil stepmother, and since she's a cyborg, she's in danger of being pulled to be a guinea pig for the cure to the plague. Note: the cure has not been found yet, which means a lot of dead/dying cyborgs. Cinder's skill with machines grants her the title of being one of the best mechanics in the city, which means that when the crown prince's favorite robot malfunctions, he turns to her for help.

With the mystery of a missing moon princess thrown into the mix, Cinder is absolutely one of the most interesting and captivating retellings of the Cinderella story that I have ever gotten my hands on. It's got action, romance (put not really insta-love), clever dialogue and great characters. The plot is solid and deviates from the regular Cinderella story enough to make it extra interesting. Seriously, when I finished it, I was rabid about getting my hands on its sequel, Scarlet.

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Forgive me, fellow book lovers, for I have judged a book before reading it. I took one look at the summary for Cinder and said something to the effect of “Cool. . . but not my thing.” Then this book started showing up everywhere in people’s favorite books of 2012 list, and my curiosity couldn’t be contained, so I grabbed it from a local bookstore when I saw it had been marked down to a mere $5, and I found that Cinder is indeed my kind of thing.

There’s so much to like in this book. We have Cinder, the cyborg Cinderella who is a mechanic, has a good relationship with one of her stepsisters, and lives in New Beijing where there’s all sorts of intergalactic political tension and a deadly plague, and that’s only the beginning. Cinder is such a great character, fresh and unique, and Kai, the Prince in our tale, is the same way. In fact, I really like the character of Kai. In many Cinderella retellings, the Prince is little more than a plot device, but in Cinder he’s a real, living character who has decisions to make and stress on his shoulders and a million things on his mind. Every interaction between Cinder and Kai seems genuine and believable.

I give props to Meyer for making a retelling of Cinderella fresh, because while in some ways it is a classical retelling, in others it’s extremely different. As I read, I thought I had a vague idea of where the plot was going, and I did, but instead of making me lose interest that little bit of plot I could follow just left me wanting to know exactly how everything happened. Even though the book is around 380 pages, I raced through it and read it all in one sitting. I couldn’t leave Cinder and her world when I didn’t know the ending of the book. The “twist” at the end of this book was pretty obvious early on, in my opinion, but it didn’t dilute the power of the book as much as I thought it would.

This world is just so original, I’m left wanting more. I can’t wait to the sequel, Scarlet, releases in February. You can find Cinder on Amazon.

Final Impression: I loved this book. It’s so unique, filled with characters that I think will soon become favorites, and left me wanting to know more of the world. I highly recommend it. 5/5 stars.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Stormy Reviewed by Stormy June 05, 2013
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (46)

Cyborg Cinderella? Yes, Please

Forgive me, fellow book lovers, for I have judged a book before reading it. I took one look at the summary for Cinder and said something to the effect of “Cool. . . but not my thing.” Then this book started showing up everywhere in people’s favorite books of 2012 list, and my curiosity couldn’t be contained, so I grabbed it from a local bookstore when I saw it had been marked down to a mere $5, and I found that Cinder is indeed my kind of thing.

There’s so much to like in this book. We have Cinder, the cyborg Cinderella who is a mechanic, has a good relationship with one of her stepsisters, and lives in New Beijing where there’s all sorts of intergalactic political tension and a deadly plague, and that’s only the beginning. Cinder is such a great character, fresh and unique, and Kai, the Prince in our tale, is the same way. In fact, I really like the character of Kai. In many Cinderella retellings, the Prince is little more than a plot device, but in Cinder he’s a real, living character who has decisions to make and stress on his shoulders and a million things on his mind. Every interaction between Cinder and Kai seems genuine and believable.

I give props to Meyer for making a retelling of Cinderella fresh, because while in some ways it is a classical retelling, in others it’s extremely different. As I read, I thought I had a vague idea of where the plot was going, and I did, but instead of making me lose interest that little bit of plot I could follow just left me wanting to know exactly how everything happened. Even though the book is around 380 pages, I raced through it and read it all in one sitting. I couldn’t leave Cinder and her world when I didn’t know the ending of the book. The “twist” at the end of this book was pretty obvious early on, in my opinion, but it didn’t dilute the power of the book as much as I thought it would.

This world is just so original, I’m left wanting more. I can’t wait to the sequel, Scarlet, releases in February. You can find Cinder on Amazon.

Final Impression: I loved this book. It’s so unique, filled with characters that I think will soon become favorites, and left me wanting to know more of the world. I highly recommend it. 5/5 stars.

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OMG WOW! I have seen a lot of concepts for the Cinderella story. Although most were really good, some were extremely far fetched. I was on the fence about this book when I first read the synopsis, but Marissa definitely got my attention! This book was amazing. I loved how everything played out and the amount of thought and effort she put behind this book. I was extremely happy I picked this one up and gave it a chance. It was a really great book.

Meyer has turned fairy tale into a whole new meaning. We meet a cyborg named Cinder who faces the many hardships we saw in the Cinderella we grew up on. There is a Prince whom everyone fawns over, an evil stepmother, two stepsisters, and hard manual labor. Yet, Marissa made this story amazingly different.

Cinder has no idea how or why she became a cyborg. All she knows is the injustice she has to face everyday because of what she is. I really liked her character. She seemed so down to earth and just like any normal teenager. She has hopes and dreams and a secret crush on the Prince. Speaking of which, Prince Kai was adorable!

Kai has a lot on his plate. He has the loss of his parents and the imminent threat of war against his kingdom and the rest of the world to deal with, not to mention he has to rule as well. I was devastated reading his hardships. I felt that Kai was never going to get a break from the cruelty of the world. He has to also deal with the suffering how thousands as the “blue fever” plague, better known as Letumosis, sweeps through his kingdom. Will he ever find a cure for a disease that has been around for years now?

My favorite character was Iko. She is an android and Cinder’s best friend. Her honesty and perkiness was to die for. She was just too cute! I kind of imagined her as Wall-E, just a cleaner, whiter version. She was the comical side of this book for me. Not to mention she was also infatuated with the Prince lol.

Cinder and Kai have to each deal with the Lunars in a different but similar way. Queen Levana has become too much to handle, and secrets are unraveling faster than anyone can handle. Although I kind of guessed the bigger secret, it was still a pleasant surprise when push came to shove. I was pissed by Kai reaction to Cinder’s revealed secrets. This added him to my cold shoulder list. I cannot explain further since I do not want to ruin this discovery for you.

The most heart wrenching part of the story for me was when Cinder lost two people quite close to her. I was in shock after it happened. I guess when you think of Cinderella you think happily ever after, and that is definitely not what you get with this story. This is by no means a bad thing. I was quite relieved that it took a different turn. Not everything can turn out picture perfect. There is no happily ever after in real life, and what made this story all the more better; the realistic scenarios in the story. I am really eager to read the next story in this series. I hope Scarlet is just as good as this one!
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Ashley Rogers Reviewed by Ashley Rogers May 15, 2013
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (32)

My Cinder Review

OMG WOW! I have seen a lot of concepts for the Cinderella story. Although most were really good, some were extremely far fetched. I was on the fence about this book when I first read the synopsis, but Marissa definitely got my attention! This book was amazing. I loved how everything played out and the amount of thought and effort she put behind this book. I was extremely happy I picked this one up and gave it a chance. It was a really great book.

Meyer has turned fairy tale into a whole new meaning. We meet a cyborg named Cinder who faces the many hardships we saw in the Cinderella we grew up on. There is a Prince whom everyone fawns over, an evil stepmother, two stepsisters, and hard manual labor. Yet, Marissa made this story amazingly different.

Cinder has no idea how or why she became a cyborg. All she knows is the injustice she has to face everyday because of what she is. I really liked her character. She seemed so down to earth and just like any normal teenager. She has hopes and dreams and a secret crush on the Prince. Speaking of which, Prince Kai was adorable!

Kai has a lot on his plate. He has the loss of his parents and the imminent threat of war against his kingdom and the rest of the world to deal with, not to mention he has to rule as well. I was devastated reading his hardships. I felt that Kai was never going to get a break from the cruelty of the world. He has to also deal with the suffering how thousands as the “blue fever” plague, better known as Letumosis, sweeps through his kingdom. Will he ever find a cure for a disease that has been around for years now?

My favorite character was Iko. She is an android and Cinder’s best friend. Her honesty and perkiness was to die for. She was just too cute! I kind of imagined her as Wall-E, just a cleaner, whiter version. She was the comical side of this book for me. Not to mention she was also infatuated with the Prince lol.

Cinder and Kai have to each deal with the Lunars in a different but similar way. Queen Levana has become too much to handle, and secrets are unraveling faster than anyone can handle. Although I kind of guessed the bigger secret, it was still a pleasant surprise when push came to shove. I was pissed by Kai reaction to Cinder’s revealed secrets. This added him to my cold shoulder list. I cannot explain further since I do not want to ruin this discovery for you.

The most heart wrenching part of the story for me was when Cinder lost two people quite close to her. I was in shock after it happened. I guess when you think of Cinderella you think happily ever after, and that is definitely not what you get with this story. This is by no means a bad thing. I was quite relieved that it took a different turn. Not everything can turn out picture perfect. There is no happily ever after in real life, and what made this story all the more better; the realistic scenarios in the story. I am really eager to read the next story in this series. I hope Scarlet is just as good as this one!

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Steph's Review:
Cinder is a wonderful read that follows retelling pattern of the fairy tale, Cinderella (hence Cinder). We get a robotic twist in this one, where our protagonist, Cinder, is a cyborg. Caught in a terrible fire as a child, Cinder was injured so horribly to the point where surgeons had to replace parts of skin, limbs, and bones with metal parts in order for her to survive. It's great having her life back, but the downside is losing privileges that a "normal human" would have. She's basically treated like dirt, just like the beginning of the tale of Cinderella, and she even lives with two step-sisters and an wicked stepmother. The plus is being a great mechanic--something that's hard not to be good at especially when parts of your body are chunks of metal. Weighed down with the job of being the only source of income for her "family", Cinder really has nothing great to say about her life.

When one of Cinder's sisters contracts the cure-less, ravaging plague "letumosis", the blame is put on Cinder by Adri, none other than Cinder's evil stepmother. Looking for any chance to get rid of a burden, Adri hands Cinder over to the New Beijing government to be a guinea pig for letumosis cure testing, in exchange for money. While being prodded at though, scientists find a special secret about Cinder, one she did not know about herself. She is a double-edged sword. She may be the savior to humankind, but if the Lunars (the enemies in disguise) get their hands on her, it could all be over.

I am a really big fan of the Cinderella story amongst fairytales, so of course I would enjoy any revamp of it. Meyer makes Cinder a witty and sarcastic heroine, and throws her into the most awkward situations (I love reading awkward situations, have you noticed? :D). These situations include our lovely prince, Kai. I didn't feel Kai was a super hot guy, but I liked him, just like in the real Cinderella story. He is a complex character; he is a prince who basically wishes he wasn't one, but must stand strong to his country who lives in fear of the Lunars and the plague. The poor guy can't really catch a break, especially with his father having contracted the plague as well. Cinder automatically grows on him because she's one of the few people who doesn't treat him like a prince, and she actually bothers to joke with him. Some of Cinder's lines really made me LOL during the book, especially this one (No not with Kai unfortunately, with the docs. Probably one of my favorites in the whole book!):

“I don't know. I don't actually remember anything from before the surgery."

His eyebrows rose, his blue eyes sucking in all the light of the room. "The cybernetic opetation?"

"No, the sex change."

The doctor's smile faltered.

"I'm joking.”

Besides the plague, New Beijing has the Lunars to worry about--people of the moon hence their name. With their magic of brainwashing and compulsion, they could bend any human to their will and take over the world. The only thing stopping them is the tense peace treaty signed between Earth and Lunars. It's fragile, and deteriorating. I detest these Lunars with all of my heart, and it was a wonderful twist on top of the normal Cinderella story. I think the conflict with the Lunars is what makes this story stand out, because if it was only the fairy tail it'd be pretty mediocre. Without warning, Cinder is thrown into the heart of the Lunar/Earthen problem, where keeping her secret is the utmost priority.

The only problem with this book is that since it is a retelling, it is very predictable. I could sense the plot twists and the ending from miles away, so I never felt especially giddy at any point in the book. It is a great read, no doubt, but it isn't particularly suspenseful. I love the world and characters though, and they make up for the so-so plot. I am definitely going to be reading Scarlet, book 2 of the Lunar Chronicles, which is the story of Red Riding Hood told Marissa Meyer style!

From Steph @ http://awalkonwords.blogspot.com/
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0

Fantastic Twist onto Cinderella!

Steph's Review:
Cinder is a wonderful read that follows retelling pattern of the fairy tale, Cinderella (hence Cinder). We get a robotic twist in this one, where our protagonist, Cinder, is a cyborg. Caught in a terrible fire as a child, Cinder was injured so horribly to the point where surgeons had to replace parts of skin, limbs, and bones with metal parts in order for her to survive. It's great having her life back, but the downside is losing privileges that a "normal human" would have. She's basically treated like dirt, just like the beginning of the tale of Cinderella, and she even lives with two step-sisters and an wicked stepmother. The plus is being a great mechanic--something that's hard not to be good at especially when parts of your body are chunks of metal. Weighed down with the job of being the only source of income for her "family", Cinder really has nothing great to say about her life.

When one of Cinder's sisters contracts the cure-less, ravaging plague "letumosis", the blame is put on Cinder by Adri, none other than Cinder's evil stepmother. Looking for any chance to get rid of a burden, Adri hands Cinder over to the New Beijing government to be a guinea pig for letumosis cure testing, in exchange for money. While being prodded at though, scientists find a special secret about Cinder, one she did not know about herself. She is a double-edged sword. She may be the savior to humankind, but if the Lunars (the enemies in disguise) get their hands on her, it could all be over.

I am a really big fan of the Cinderella story amongst fairytales, so of course I would enjoy any revamp of it. Meyer makes Cinder a witty and sarcastic heroine, and throws her into the most awkward situations (I love reading awkward situations, have you noticed? :D). These situations include our lovely prince, Kai. I didn't feel Kai was a super hot guy, but I liked him, just like in the real Cinderella story. He is a complex character; he is a prince who basically wishes he wasn't one, but must stand strong to his country who lives in fear of the Lunars and the plague. The poor guy can't really catch a break, especially with his father having contracted the plague as well. Cinder automatically grows on him because she's one of the few people who doesn't treat him like a prince, and she actually bothers to joke with him. Some of Cinder's lines really made me LOL during the book, especially this one (No not with Kai unfortunately, with the docs. Probably one of my favorites in the whole book!):

“I don't know. I don't actually remember anything from before the surgery."

His eyebrows rose, his blue eyes sucking in all the light of the room. "The cybernetic opetation?"

"No, the sex change."

The doctor's smile faltered.

"I'm joking.”

Besides the plague, New Beijing has the Lunars to worry about--people of the moon hence their name. With their magic of brainwashing and compulsion, they could bend any human to their will and take over the world. The only thing stopping them is the tense peace treaty signed between Earth and Lunars. It's fragile, and deteriorating. I detest these Lunars with all of my heart, and it was a wonderful twist on top of the normal Cinderella story. I think the conflict with the Lunars is what makes this story stand out, because if it was only the fairy tail it'd be pretty mediocre. Without warning, Cinder is thrown into the heart of the Lunar/Earthen problem, where keeping her secret is the utmost priority.

The only problem with this book is that since it is a retelling, it is very predictable. I could sense the plot twists and the ending from miles away, so I never felt especially giddy at any point in the book. It is a great read, no doubt, but it isn't particularly suspenseful. I love the world and characters though, and they make up for the so-so plot. I am definitely going to be reading Scarlet, book 2 of the Lunar Chronicles, which is the story of Red Riding Hood told Marissa Meyer style!

From Steph @ http://awalkonwords.blogspot.com/

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I absolutely loved that this was set in futuristic China rather than the US like so many other novels are. The author’s descriptions of New Bejing are wonderful. We get plenty of little details that made it easy to imagine. There’s androids, hover vehicles, littered streets, netscreens, and holographic fires. The Emperor’s palace is an amazing mash-up of sleek futuristic technology and ancient Chinese design. Everything is just super imaginative, but not too out there.

The characters also had a lot more depth than the fairytale. Cinder is not only mistreated by her stepmother, but she’s also looked down upon by those in society who know she is a cyborg. Cinder tries to blend in as much as possible and earns her keep as a mechanic. Her stepsister, Pearl, is cruel towards Cinder, but her younger sister, Peony isn’t. Even though that strays from the original, I loved that Cinder had at least one person who cared for her. Cinder loves her little sister very much, and I felt so awful when her one ally is taken away by med-droids after contracting the plague. At that point Cinder’s life as she knows it changes forever.

Cinder now has to deal with her stepmother’s backlash, since she blames Cinder for her youngest daughter’s illness as well as her husband’s death. It’s no secret that Adri is disgusted by Cinder and wants her gone. Cinder also gets sold off to become a lab rat in order to find a cure for the plague, but her test results reveal a lot of unknown things about her heritage. There’s a bit of a mystery surrounding that, but it was very predictable. However, that didn’t keep me from enjoying it.

In addition to the new technology and the swiftly spreading disease, Cinder also covers some of the politics of the time. The moon is now inhabited by Lunars and a peace treaty is needed between them and Earth. However, the Lunar queen, Levada, is a horrible woman! She wants what she wants, and she wants it now! She’ll stop at nothing to gain power and take control of Earth, but Prince Kai does his best to not allow it. Kai has a huge burden to carry, but he still manages to be incredibly charming. Unfortunately, Cinder makes sure to keep him at a steel arm’s length.

Cinder is a highly imaginative retelling of Cinderella! It keeps just enough of the original premise in tact to make it recognizable, but it also has plenty of unique features to set it apart. It’s also full of characters that you’ll both love and hate, and maybe love to hate! This book is full of twists and turns for our heroine, but she handles them to the best of her ability. The ending has left me wanting more! Damn that cliffhanger!
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Angie F. Reviewed by Angie F. April 08, 2013
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (87)

Cinder

I absolutely loved that this was set in futuristic China rather than the US like so many other novels are. The author’s descriptions of New Bejing are wonderful. We get plenty of little details that made it easy to imagine. There’s androids, hover vehicles, littered streets, netscreens, and holographic fires. The Emperor’s palace is an amazing mash-up of sleek futuristic technology and ancient Chinese design. Everything is just super imaginative, but not too out there.

The characters also had a lot more depth than the fairytale. Cinder is not only mistreated by her stepmother, but she’s also looked down upon by those in society who know she is a cyborg. Cinder tries to blend in as much as possible and earns her keep as a mechanic. Her stepsister, Pearl, is cruel towards Cinder, but her younger sister, Peony isn’t. Even though that strays from the original, I loved that Cinder had at least one person who cared for her. Cinder loves her little sister very much, and I felt so awful when her one ally is taken away by med-droids after contracting the plague. At that point Cinder’s life as she knows it changes forever.

Cinder now has to deal with her stepmother’s backlash, since she blames Cinder for her youngest daughter’s illness as well as her husband’s death. It’s no secret that Adri is disgusted by Cinder and wants her gone. Cinder also gets sold off to become a lab rat in order to find a cure for the plague, but her test results reveal a lot of unknown things about her heritage. There’s a bit of a mystery surrounding that, but it was very predictable. However, that didn’t keep me from enjoying it.

In addition to the new technology and the swiftly spreading disease, Cinder also covers some of the politics of the time. The moon is now inhabited by Lunars and a peace treaty is needed between them and Earth. However, the Lunar queen, Levada, is a horrible woman! She wants what she wants, and she wants it now! She’ll stop at nothing to gain power and take control of Earth, but Prince Kai does his best to not allow it. Kai has a huge burden to carry, but he still manages to be incredibly charming. Unfortunately, Cinder makes sure to keep him at a steel arm’s length.

Cinder is a highly imaginative retelling of Cinderella! It keeps just enough of the original premise in tact to make it recognizable, but it also has plenty of unique features to set it apart. It’s also full of characters that you’ll both love and hate, and maybe love to hate! This book is full of twists and turns for our heroine, but she handles them to the best of her ability. The ending has left me wanting more! Damn that cliffhanger!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Cinder is a wonderful futuristic retelling of the Cinderella story. Even the man character's name plays on the name Cinderella, which is kind of neat.

I really enjoyed watching Cinder fall for the Prince. But, of course, there's a bigger plot than Cinder just getting the Prince, which is something I found slightly surprising. The book deals with disease, aliens, and futuristic technology (of course). These are all interesting elements that aren't usually thrown together in a Cinderella type story. I cannot wait for the next three books in the series. They're going to be amazing.

I'm look forward to anything Marissa Meyer writes. The book was never dull or boring and everything just escalates until it finally breaks apart. I loved Cinder. I'm not sure if she or the Prince is my favorite character. All in all, a wonderful book.
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Stephanie Reviewed by Stephanie March 29, 2013
Last updated: March 29, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (9)

Cinder

Cinder is a wonderful futuristic retelling of the Cinderella story. Even the man character's name plays on the name Cinderella, which is kind of neat.

I really enjoyed watching Cinder fall for the Prince. But, of course, there's a bigger plot than Cinder just getting the Prince, which is something I found slightly surprising. The book deals with disease, aliens, and futuristic technology (of course). These are all interesting elements that aren't usually thrown together in a Cinderella type story. I cannot wait for the next three books in the series. They're going to be amazing.

I'm look forward to anything Marissa Meyer writes. The book was never dull or boring and everything just escalates until it finally breaks apart. I loved Cinder. I'm not sure if she or the Prince is my favorite character. All in all, a wonderful book.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Everybody in Bloglandia loves Cinder. When this book first came out, it was accompanied by so much buzz, hype, and all-around gushing that I just knew, despite my wrinkle-nose reactions to Cinderella retellings, I had to get my hands on Cinder asap.

“Asap” is a relative term, however, since I’m writing this review almost ten months past Cinder’s release date. And this is, honestly, one of the 2012 releases I wish I’d preordered. Cinder is very, very good.

Right off the bat, I was struck by Marissa Meyer’s strong, graceful prose and the way she wrote her scenes and characters. Cyborgs, Lunars, World War IV; they all fit very well together and created a seamless first impression. And even once I got past those initial thoughts, I still found Cinder to be unique and well-written.

Maybe, however, the Cinderella elements weren’t necessary? It felt, to me, that Marissa Meyer had created a really awesome future society, but wanted a quick way to make it marketable. Maybe. The Cinderella bits, while very integral to the plot itself, didn’t feel important. This is a four book series, and Cinder covered all of the Cinderella fairytale—future installments won’t be able to hide behind the fairytale gimmick, and honestly, Marissa Meyer’s writing and story crafting doesn’t need to in the first place. So why do it?

There was also a teensy issue with dramatic irony/predictibility. I’m not a fan of that type of plot. I always see that kind of thing coming a thousand miles away, and it always annoys me more than gets me emotionally invested, which is doubtless the actual intention.

Anyway. Back to characters. I liked Cinder a lot. She didn’t have a standout personality (not super sassy, super beautiful, super intelligent, super anything). That was really nice, since, for once, it really did seem like an author was sticking to the “ordinary girl” archetype and was actually serious about it. Prince Kai, of course, was drop-deadly gorgeous, charming, noble. Typical prince. I wasn’t particularly impressed with him, but both he and Cinder were very realistic, well-crafted people.

Yet while the protagonists were all right, if unremarkable, I was a tad bit annoyed by both of the antagonists, Cinder’s stepmother and the evil Lunar queen. I’m currently going through a stage where “purely evil” characters don’t work for me. I guess, given that this is supposedly based on a fairytale, juvenile black and white characters should be a given. I prefer my shades of gray, personally.

All around, Cinder was unexpectedly good. I really enjoyed the plot and the prose, even if the characters themselves were lackluster. Marissa Meyer is a skilled storyteller, and her writing came across as very smooth and controlled. And while Ella Enchanted will forever have the number one place in my heart (Kai =/= Char), there might be room somewhere in there for Cinder.
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
3.0
Writing Style 
 
4.0
Renae M Reviewed by Renae M March 25, 2013
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (184)

Cinder

Everybody in Bloglandia loves Cinder. When this book first came out, it was accompanied by so much buzz, hype, and all-around gushing that I just knew, despite my wrinkle-nose reactions to Cinderella retellings, I had to get my hands on Cinder asap.

“Asap” is a relative term, however, since I’m writing this review almost ten months past Cinder’s release date. And this is, honestly, one of the 2012 releases I wish I’d preordered. Cinder is very, very good.

Right off the bat, I was struck by Marissa Meyer’s strong, graceful prose and the way she wrote her scenes and characters. Cyborgs, Lunars, World War IV; they all fit very well together and created a seamless first impression. And even once I got past those initial thoughts, I still found Cinder to be unique and well-written.

Maybe, however, the Cinderella elements weren’t necessary? It felt, to me, that Marissa Meyer had created a really awesome future society, but wanted a quick way to make it marketable. Maybe. The Cinderella bits, while very integral to the plot itself, didn’t feel important. This is a four book series, and Cinder covered all of the Cinderella fairytale—future installments won’t be able to hide behind the fairytale gimmick, and honestly, Marissa Meyer’s writing and story crafting doesn’t need to in the first place. So why do it?

There was also a teensy issue with dramatic irony/predictibility. I’m not a fan of that type of plot. I always see that kind of thing coming a thousand miles away, and it always annoys me more than gets me emotionally invested, which is doubtless the actual intention.

Anyway. Back to characters. I liked Cinder a lot. She didn’t have a standout personality (not super sassy, super beautiful, super intelligent, super anything). That was really nice, since, for once, it really did seem like an author was sticking to the “ordinary girl” archetype and was actually serious about it. Prince Kai, of course, was drop-deadly gorgeous, charming, noble. Typical prince. I wasn’t particularly impressed with him, but both he and Cinder were very realistic, well-crafted people.

Yet while the protagonists were all right, if unremarkable, I was a tad bit annoyed by both of the antagonists, Cinder’s stepmother and the evil Lunar queen. I’m currently going through a stage where “purely evil” characters don’t work for me. I guess, given that this is supposedly based on a fairytale, juvenile black and white characters should be a given. I prefer my shades of gray, personally.

All around, Cinder was unexpectedly good. I really enjoyed the plot and the prose, even if the characters themselves were lackluster. Marissa Meyer is a skilled storyteller, and her writing came across as very smooth and controlled. And while Ella Enchanted will forever have the number one place in my heart (Kai =/= Char), there might be room somewhere in there for Cinder.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Why I Loved It: Out of books from 2012, this is one of the most unexpected love-at-first-read experiences I've had. The whole cyborg thing had me off a little, if only because it's not something I have gotten into with a book, even with my love of Star Trek. However my sister read my copy and loved it. That along with raving reviews from people I trust on Goodreads and the blogging community lead me to pick up the book, open it, and give it a chance. And afterwards, I wanted to hit myself in the head with it for waiting for so stinkin' long to read it. It was incredible. INCREDIBLE! Now all I want is more, more, MORE! *Ok I will cool it on the all-caps now*

I will keep this short and sweet for you. This is a futuristic spin on the Cinderella tale. The whole cyborg thing tends to turn people off when I first bring it up, but seriously the cyborg part just adds to the story that is already incredible. It's not weird or strange or a bit distracting from the rest of the setting. It just works. So if cyborg makes you go "ehhh", trust me. Get over it and read the book.

This is one of the most creative spins on Cinderella that I have ever read. In fact, the whole story line is filled with this incredible creative energy. There is so much mystery in Cinder's past, even though I kinda figured out where we were going a bit early, that the story seems to take on a life of it's own, enveloping you, and carrying you along for the ride. Ms. Meyer's character development is phenomenal, and I especially loved what she did with the moon. And Cinder is such a lovable character: honest, loyal, and funny. I laughed a lot during the book.

The summary sounds completely sci-fi. It's really a mix of sci-fi, hint of historical, lots of dystopian, and a fantasy that drives the book.

For those who have read Cinder, remember tomorrow Scarlett comes out, the second in the Lunar Chronicles. I'm so PSYCHED! I shall provide the trailer below.
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Deidra Reviewed by Deidra March 15, 2013
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (36)

More Please!

Why I Loved It: Out of books from 2012, this is one of the most unexpected love-at-first-read experiences I've had. The whole cyborg thing had me off a little, if only because it's not something I have gotten into with a book, even with my love of Star Trek. However my sister read my copy and loved it. That along with raving reviews from people I trust on Goodreads and the blogging community lead me to pick up the book, open it, and give it a chance. And afterwards, I wanted to hit myself in the head with it for waiting for so stinkin' long to read it. It was incredible. INCREDIBLE! Now all I want is more, more, MORE! *Ok I will cool it on the all-caps now*

I will keep this short and sweet for you. This is a futuristic spin on the Cinderella tale. The whole cyborg thing tends to turn people off when I first bring it up, but seriously the cyborg part just adds to the story that is already incredible. It's not weird or strange or a bit distracting from the rest of the setting. It just works. So if cyborg makes you go "ehhh", trust me. Get over it and read the book.

This is one of the most creative spins on Cinderella that I have ever read. In fact, the whole story line is filled with this incredible creative energy. There is so much mystery in Cinder's past, even though I kinda figured out where we were going a bit early, that the story seems to take on a life of it's own, enveloping you, and carrying you along for the ride. Ms. Meyer's character development is phenomenal, and I especially loved what she did with the moon. And Cinder is such a lovable character: honest, loyal, and funny. I laughed a lot during the book.

The summary sounds completely sci-fi. It's really a mix of sci-fi, hint of historical, lots of dystopian, and a fantasy that drives the book.

For those who have read Cinder, remember tomorrow Scarlett comes out, the second in the Lunar Chronicles. I'm so PSYCHED! I shall provide the trailer below.

Was this review helpful to you? 
I had some serious doubts going into this book. Usually when a book is extremely hyped I find myself not liking it as much as everybody else. I am honestly glad to say that this was not the case with Cinder. Everything from the character development and the setting to the plot totally blew me away. I read this book in about 3 days and hated every time I had to put this one down.

When I first heard what this book was about I was a little skeptical, a retelling of Cinderella where she's a cyborg? It turns out that the author has a talent for taking classic fairy tales and reinventing them.

I loved Cinder. She was a fantastic character. She was well developed and had some sense and wasn't afraid to kick butt or stand up for what she believed in. When put with her Android friend Iko I found myself laughing at times and others just had me in tears. Then we have Prince Kai, who becomes the love interest even though it's denied for a while Cinder just can't resist his charms. I absolutely despised Cinder's stepmother Adri and her stepsister Pearl. They were the horrible characters much like the ones in the original tale, the only difference was that the other stepsister, Peony, was kind to Cinder and was her friend.

The setting of this book was fantastic. It's the world we all know but in the future. This takes place in Asia and all of the separate Asian countries have united to create the Eastern Commonwealth. I love how the author took time to describe things from the hovers that are used for transportation all the way to how the buildings are crammed together to house a large population.

This book completely blew me away. If you haven't read it yet I suggest you pick it up you will not regret it. I will be not-so-patiently waiting for the next installment in this series!
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Plot 
 
5.0
Characters 
 
5.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0
Sarah Reviewed by Sarah March 06, 2013
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (47)

Cinder

I had some serious doubts going into this book. Usually when a book is extremely hyped I find myself not liking it as much as everybody else. I am honestly glad to say that this was not the case with Cinder. Everything from the character development and the setting to the plot totally blew me away. I read this book in about 3 days and hated every time I had to put this one down.

When I first heard what this book was about I was a little skeptical, a retelling of Cinderella where she's a cyborg? It turns out that the author has a talent for taking classic fairy tales and reinventing them.

I loved Cinder. She was a fantastic character. She was well developed and had some sense and wasn't afraid to kick butt or stand up for what she believed in. When put with her Android friend Iko I found myself laughing at times and others just had me in tears. Then we have Prince Kai, who becomes the love interest even though it's denied for a while Cinder just can't resist his charms. I absolutely despised Cinder's stepmother Adri and her stepsister Pearl. They were the horrible characters much like the ones in the original tale, the only difference was that the other stepsister, Peony, was kind to Cinder and was her friend.

The setting of this book was fantastic. It's the world we all know but in the future. This takes place in Asia and all of the separate Asian countries have united to create the Eastern Commonwealth. I love how the author took time to describe things from the hovers that are used for transportation all the way to how the buildings are crammed together to house a large population.

This book completely blew me away. If you haven't read it yet I suggest you pick it up you will not regret it. I will be not-so-patiently waiting for the next installment in this series!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
Published by Feiwel and Friends
On Shelves Now
Reviewed by: Middle Sis Jenn
The Sisters Say: Charming (as in Prince….hehehe), Captivating, and Cool

So, I finally broke down and read Cinder because I have an ARC of Scarlet, and I needed to know what all the hoopla was about. I really enjoyed it; however, it had been put on such a high pedestal that I don’t think it could have ever lived up to the hype for me. I was expecting it to just blow me away, and I ended up just getting another good YA book. (Now, Scarlet, on the other hand, did blow me away!)

I am kind of new to fairy-tale retellings, only having read a few, so I really enjoyed that part of this story. I loved how Marissa had taken the classic characters and morphed them into something new and different, yet echoing the sentiments of the originals. I especially loved what she did with Cinder, making her a cyborg in a world where cyborgs are looked upon as little better than scrap metal. She was a pariah, yet she didn’t let that hold her down. Cinder knew exactly what she wanted, and even in the face of adversity, loss, and unimaginable revelations, she kept her focus and her strength. I found myself cheering for Cinder to succeed and win the guy. Cinder herself was by far the best part of this book—so unique, and I really loved her personality as it shined through the pages.

Now, I’m not sure I understand the fandom behind Kai. I remember during our Crush Tourney this past summer that so many people loved him, but I just don’t see it. Yes, he’s this Prince Charming guy, but other than that, there wasn’t anything striking about him. He just seemed to be this normal guy in a not so normal situation and place in society. He seemed weak with the Lunars (although most people are I will admit), and I just wanted him to be more…confident and charismatic. I’m hoping that in the future books he will grow into his position more, and stop worrying about what the world thinks/wants.

I really enjoyed the world that Marissa created—futuristic in some ways, but in other ways, the same as ours. Earth is being ravished by a deadly plague, and as a result, fear and panic are overwhelming. I could feel the tension and the uncertainty in Marissa’s words, and her world seemed to come alive around me. I loved the androids and technology that Marissa described, and I look forward to seeing more of it in the future.

I wish that it would have been a little less predictable. But maybe Marissa wanted us to be able to predict what was going to happen, I don’t know.
However, I like when I am surprised by the ending or a revelation in the book, and unfortunately, I did not get a surprise in this one. I saw everything coming, and that was without knowing anything about the book in the first place. Here’s to hoping that the next books will leave more in the shadows.
Overall, this was a great and fun read. Is it one that I will rush over to my friends and demand they read at once? Not normally, but having read Scarlet and knowing what is coming, I just might do it anyway.
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Plot 
 
4.0
Characters 
 
4.0
Writing Style 
 
5.0

Good, but not up to the hype

Cinder by Marissa Meyer
Published by Feiwel and Friends
On Shelves Now
Reviewed by: Middle Sis Jenn
The Sisters Say: Charming (as in Prince….hehehe), Captivating, and Cool

So, I finally broke down and read Cinder because I have an ARC of Scarlet, and I needed to know what all the hoopla was about. I really enjoyed it; however, it had been put on such a high pedestal that I don’t think it could have ever lived up to the hype for me. I was expecting it to just blow me away, and I ended up just getting another good YA book. (Now, Scarlet, on the other hand, did blow me away!)

I am kind of new to fairy-tale retellings, only having read a few, so I really enjoyed that part of this story. I loved how Marissa had taken the classic characters and morphed them into something new and different, yet echoing the sentiments of the originals. I especially loved what she did with Cinder, making her a cyborg in a world where cyborgs are looked upon as little better than scrap metal. She was a pariah, yet she didn’t let that hold her down. Cinder knew exactly what she wanted, and even in the face of adversity, loss, and unimaginable revelations, she kept her focus and her strength. I found myself cheering for Cinder to succeed and win the guy. Cinder herself was by far the best part of this book—so unique, and I really loved her personality as it shined through the pages.

Now, I’m not sure I understand the fandom behind Kai. I remember during our Crush Tourney this past summer that so many people loved him, but I just don’t see it. Yes, he’s this Prince Charming guy, but other than that, there wasn’t anything striking about him. He just seemed to be this normal guy in a not so normal situation and place in society. He seemed weak with the Lunars (although most people are I will admit), and I just wanted him to be more…confident and charismatic. I’m hoping that in the future books he will grow into his position more, and stop worrying about what the world thinks/wants.

I really enjoyed the world that Marissa created—futuristic in some ways, but in other ways, the same as ours. Earth is being ravished by a deadly plague, and as a result, fear and panic are overwhelming. I could feel the tension and the uncertainty in Marissa’s words, and her world seemed to come alive around me. I loved the androids and technology that Marissa described, and I look forward to seeing more of it in the future.

I wish that it would have been a little less predictable. But maybe Marissa wanted us to be able to predict what was going to happen, I don’t know.
However, I like when I am surprised by the ending or a revelation in the book, and unfortunately, I did not get a surprise in this one. I saw everything coming, and that was without knowing anything about the book in the first place. Here’s to hoping that the next books will leave more in the shadows.
Overall, this was a great and fun read. Is it one that I will rush over to my friends and demand they read at once? Not normally, but having read Scarlet and knowing what is coming, I just might do it anyway.

Was this review helpful to you? 
 
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